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  • Museum of Making Music
    have entered a wrong verification code Request a Fieldtrip Would you like to book a fieldtrip to the Museum of Making Music Please use this form to request a date for your group Contact Information Your Name Organization Street Address City Zip Code Phone Number E Mail Address Group Information Tell us more about the group you would like to bring to the museum Please enter the number of students and adults you expect to attend The Museum of Making Music allows 1 complimentary chaperone per every 5 students PLEASE NOTE If your group is over 75 students please contact us at 760 438 5996 for special accommodations of Students of Adults Chaperones Type of Group Pre School Ages 3 5 Elementary School Grade K 5 High School Grade 6 12 Home School Group Grade K 12 Title One School Qualified 3rd Grade Classes Only Scout Troop To avoid potential scheduling conflicts we ask that you choose at least two up to three different preferred fieldtrip dates We cannot guarantee that your preferred dates will be available but will do our best to accommodate your request Preferred Date 1 Time Select a time 10 00 AM 11 00 AM 12

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/component/chronoforms/?chronoform=FieldtripRequest&event=submit (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music
    A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy You have entered a wrong verification code Performance Proposal Your Name Phone Number E Mail Address What kind of program are you presenting Program Type Concert Performance Workshop Clinic Film Screening Educational Program for Adults Educational Program for Children Other Name of Program Program Description Artist Fee Please note Our fee structure for artists varies with each program For some programs we pay a flat fee to the artist and others we do a percentage of ticket sales Please keep in mind we are nonprofit organization What marketing channels will you utilize to promote this event check all that apply Traditional Media Press releases to media contacts Advertising print media Postal Mailing List Postcards Flyer Distribution E Mail List Word of Mouth Non Traditional Media Social Media Facebook MySpace Twitter Event Calendar Sites Eventbrite Eventful Meetup Google Music Sites ReverbNation Sonicbids iLike Last fm Video Streaming YouTube Vimeo uStream Stickam Location based Foursquare Gowalla

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/component/chronoforms/?chronoform=PerformanceRequest&event=submit (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - What Music Means to Me
    Music Means to Me Please note All submissions will be reviewed and moderated by the museum staff before being posted Explore Online Explore what visitors to the What Music Means to Me exhibition are sharing as part of this collaborative exhibition Written Submissions Social Media Written Submissions Music means to me freedom The freedom to create what is beautiful The freedom to help others to create The freedom to lift hearts within bodies so that they weigh less And know they ve been created by God to do great things arrow data quotes content Music means to me freedom The freedom to create what is beautiful The freedom to help others to create The freedom to lift hearts within bodies so that they weigh less And know they ve been created by God to do great things Music means to me freedom The freedom to create what is beautiful The freedom to help others to create The freedom to lift hearts within bodies so that they weigh less And know they ve been created by God to do great things Music means to me freedom The freedom to create what is beautiful The freedom to help others to create The freedom to lift hearts within bodies so that they weigh less And know they ve been created by God to do great things My life has been defined by music I met my best friend at music camp went to a college known for music Oberlin was married to a musician and lived in Brazil Germany and England I now have music loving kids and nieces arrow data quotes content My life has been defined by music I met my best friend at music camp went to a college known for music Oberlin was married to a musician and lived in Brazil Germany and England I now have music loving kids and nieces My life has been defined by music I met my best friend at music camp went to a college known for music Oberlin was married to a musician and lived in Brazil Germany and England I now have music loving kids and nieces My life has been defined by music I met my best friend at music camp went to a college known for music Oberlin was married to a musician and lived in Brazil Germany and England I now have music loving kids and nieces Music is fun because we play with them arrow data quotes content Music is fun because we play with them Music is fun because we play with them Music is fun because we play with them Music means to me cultur since I am moving to europe That music is the cultur music helps arrow data quotes content Music means to me cultur since I am moving to europe That music is the cultur music helps Music means to me cultur since I am moving to europe That music is the cultur music helps Music means to me cultur since I

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/musicmeans (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - The Sound of Sax
    MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy The Sound of Sax Jump to The Sound of Sax Adolph Sax Invented or Evolved An Early Love Affair Sax and Jazz A Timeless Cycle Wrapped in Brass Siren of Satan The Cycle Continues Bibliography Page 1 of 10 THE SOUND OF SAX When Adolphe Sax received his patent for the saxophone in 1846 Europe throbbed with the beat of the Industrial Revolution It was a time of invention and innovation That year the first practical sewing machine unleashed a garment industry Publishers praised the first cylinder printing press And Charles Darwin shook the scientific community with his third book about natural selection The Sound of Sax played just as loud A woodwind with a revolutionary conical bore the sax immediately won praise from composers as the most beautiful kind of sound they had ever heard Due to its power the saxophone soon secured favor with military bands in Europe and America But with voice like qualities and unprecedented flexibility it was destined for a much bigger stage The saxophone s popularity exploded in America Vaudeville audiences frolicked to the sax s comical tones Dancers swung

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/exhibits/past/161-saxophone?showall=&limitstart= (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - The Sound of Sax
    a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy The Sound of Sax Jump to The Sound of Sax Adolph Sax Invented or Evolved An Early Love Affair Sax and Jazz A Timeless Cycle Wrapped in Brass Siren of Satan The Cycle Continues Bibliography Page 2 of 10 ADOLPHE SAX At age 20 Adolphe Sax was already a master instrument maker credited with important improvements to the trumpet and clarinet The saxophone was his own Aiming to fill the gap between strings and brass Sax created a woodwind instrument like none other Distinct from cylinder shaped woodwinds liked the clarinet the saxophone s curved bore widened dramatically at the bell Multiple boreholes and keys gave the horn extraordinary flexibility and tonal range Sax won patents in France in 1846 and then spent decades defending them Rival instrument makers repeatedly sued Sax accused him of insanity and produced knockoffs But jealous competitors couldn t muffle the Sound of Sax In 1845 a crowd of 20 000 gathered in Paris to view a competition between two military bands One had a traditional ensemble of musicians the other ensemble included

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/exhibits/past/161-saxophone?showall=&start=1 (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - The Sound of Sax
    The Sound of Sax Adolph Sax Invented or Evolved An Early Love Affair Sax and Jazz A Timeless Cycle Wrapped in Brass Siren of Satan The Cycle Continues Bibliography Page 3 of 10 THE SAXOPHONE INVENTED OR EVOLVED Was the saxophone invented or did it evolve from something else Did Adolphe Sax invent the saxophone like Thomas Edison invented the phonograph This question is worth exploring because it illustrates the saxophone s unique place in music history Comparing Sax s creation with other instruments will help The flute dates to the Tenth Century A simple wooden tube with bore holes it evolved over the centuries to its current intricate design The clarinet s evolution was similar Played for folk music the earliest models date to the Fifteenth Century Unlike early woodwinds that gradually evolved the modern saxophone is strikingly similar to the one Sax forged in his Paris workshop during the 1840s It essentially came out complete It helps to understand Sax s reasoning He wanted an instrument that exhibited the power of brass with the subtleties of woodwinds and the capabilities of strings Such utility required all the features of the modern saxophone Granted few things are truly invented

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/exhibits/past/161-saxophone?showall=&start=2 (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - The Sound of Sax
    Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy The Sound of Sax Jump to The Sound of Sax Adolph Sax Invented or Evolved An Early Love Affair Sax and Jazz A Timeless Cycle Wrapped in Brass Siren of Satan The Cycle Continues Bibliography Page 4 of 10 AMERICA S EARLY LOVE AFFAIR WITH THE SAXOPHONE Saxarella Sax O Phun Saxophobia The saxophone was so popular in America in the 1920s it had its own language America was in love with music especially the saxophone After World War One a rising middle class sought entertainment everywhere They did the foxtrot in boisterous dance halls They flocked to vaudeville They paraded down Main Street to the beat of John Philip Sousa They even combined music with education The highbrow set attended lyceums where large crowds might hear a lecture on Populism before enjoying a lively performance by a saxophone ensemble Improvements to the gramophone and advances in recording and radio technology fueled the madness for music The industry boomed and the saxophone took off By one account there were nearly 20 000 community bands in America and virtually all included a saxophone some with three or four Saxophone ensembles sporting as

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/exhibits/past/161-saxophone?showall=&start=3 (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - The Sound of Sax
    Brass Siren of Satan The Cycle Continues Bibliography Page 5 of 10 THE SAX AND JAZZ THE PERFECT COUPLE The saxophone is often credited with giving birth to jazz but the facts tell a different story Jazz a true American music form born in the nightclubs of New Orleans had been around for three decades before the sax came on the scene in the 1920s and 30s The two were perfect for each other The flexibility range and speed of the sax enabled jazz musicians to do what they do best improvise and experiment The ability of jazz virtuosos to play extended solos took listeners on an emotional roller coaster In a single solo the music alternately hit listeners with the force of a New York traffic jam or swept them away on a cool breeze Coleman Hawkins like many jazz musicians of his day was heavily influenced by the freestyle rhythm of Louis Armstrong s cornet One of the first to play extended saxophone solos Hawkins disregarded a composition s melody playing outside the tune itself Music had never been played that way The fingering speed possible with the sax allowed virtuosos to breach the single note limits of

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/exhibits/past/161-saxophone?showall=&start=4 (2016-02-18)
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