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  • Museum of Making Music - Free Reed Organs
    reed design into their own instruments The first recognizable free reed organs were developed more or less simultaneously in the early 19th century within Germany France and the United States Many makers followed the examples of these early builders but it was Alexandre Debain in Paris who in 1842 patented a single reed organ under the name Harmonium The Harmonium became widely popular as a domestic instrument and an alternative to pipe organs in Europe The beginning of reed organ in the U S is associated with James A Bazin and Ebenezer Goodrich In 1778 Bazin of Massachusetts who was also responsible for an earlier design of harmonica in the U S invented the rocking melodeon or lap organ a miniature portable instrument that was played with a button keyboard like the accordion This design was popularized by the New Hampshire instrument maker Abraham Prescott who began manufacturing this organ in 1836 with a normal keyboard Although the sources of inspiration for Bazin s work are not known it is documented that Goodrich made his first reed organ in Boston for the artist Gilbert Stuart after he encountered sheng owned by Stuart and other imported free reeds in the Maezel

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/organs (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Single Fixed Reeds
    MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy The Evolution of Single Fixed Reeds Saxophones and clarinets are two familiar examples of modern single fixed reed instruments They are defined by a reed that is attached to a hardened surface a mouthpiece with an opening through which air can pass into a wind chamber The reed beats against the flat surface beneath activating the sound column that gives the voice to the instrument Ancient texts suggest single reed instruments originated in North Africa then migrated throughout the Middle East to Asia The instruments then moved northwest to Europe to become the hornpipe family that eventually resulted in the clarinet family and other modern reed instruments The technique of circular breathing was employed on folk clarinets to create a continuous flow of air however its difficulty led to the development of gourd windchambers on instruments such as the snake charmer or bags on bagpipes to make producing a continuous channel of air easier Medieval hornpipes and most bagpipe drones contain single reeds that are identical to those of the Indian pungi snake charmer and the Egyptian arghul folk clarinet Most folk clarinets were personal instruments

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/fixed-reeds (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Double Reeds
    zurna a conical double reed instrument There are two branches of double reeds the Oboe family also referred to as the conical double reed family which spread to Europe from Africa and to Asia from the Middle East and the tubular double reed family which spread from the Baltics to East Asia As their name would suggest most double reed instruments incorporate two reeds that vibrate against one another to produce sound although quadruple and sextuple reeds are also in use In both single and double reeds the pitch of the reed generated column of air is determined by open fingerholes or similar mechanisms Conical instruments have a small double or multiple reed that is usually placed on a tapered tube that attaches to a cone shaped body ending in a flare or bell These instruments are believed to have originated in Persia or North Africa then spread to India Africa Tibet and further outward to East Asia and Europe In Europe they became the medieval shawm family a direct predecessor of the modern oboe and the melody pipes of bagpipes Tubular instruments utilize a large double reed placed in the end of a tube shaped body without a flare

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/double-reeds (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - What is a Stompbox?
    Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy What is a Stompbox A stompbox is a device that musicians use to change the sound of their instrument and ultimately to find their own signature sound Also known as effects pedals stompboxes probably get their name because musicians use their feet to control them They are often though certainly not exclusively used with electric guitars and they can alter sound in many different ways Although today there is a multitude of sound processing devices as a result of the digital technology boom stompboxes remain one of the most favored tools to manipulate sound A typical effects pedal features an input and output jack a pedal switch or button that activates and deactivates the effect and any number of knobs buttons sliders and switches that control specific aspects of the effect Effects pedals usually draw power from an external AC cord or from an internal 9V battery About the Exhibit What is a Stompbox The Birth of

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/stompbox-what (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - The Birth of Stompboxes
    of Stompboxes The birth of stompboxes and other similar effects units is closely linked to the 1947 invention of the transistor Bell Labs It replaced the vacuum tube and was much more compact in size and offered more stability First applied in military business and medical technology by the early 1960s the transistor was being utilized in music to produce the first transistorized guitar effect known as the Maestro Fuzz Tone pedal Fuzz effect boxes quickly became very popular among musicians They were used as an expressive tool by garage bands and helped define the sound of the musical genres associated with the anti establishment culture of the era The successful launch of the fuzz pedal was followed in the late 1960s by an emergence of manufacturers specializing in effects pedals The development of stompboxes is part of a longstanding tradition to manipulate sound in music However before the relatively recent application of electricity to music the means for manipulating sound to achieve expressiveness was strictly mechanical in nature For example a string player could use a bow pluck the strings or slide between notes wind instrument players could use breath vibrato techniques or devices such as mutes keyboard and

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/stompbox-birth (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Categories of Effects
    singers or an orchestra The sound has been described as thick lush and wide REVERSE DELAY The reverse delay plays samples of music backwards imitating the practice of flipping the tape over during recording sessions in the 1960s REVERB The reverb effect from the word reverberation is the result of many echoes with differing delay times that feed back upon each other as if the sound were reverberating in an acoustically reflective space LOOPING This pedal allows the musician to record several layers of musical phrases which are then played back over and over i e looped Thus the musician can create a rich musical texture over which they can solo in essence creating a one man band Looping is a significant element in sampling hip hop and ambient music Cellist Zoe Keating is known for her innovative use of looping to create sonic atmospheres with her amplified instrument Tone Fuzz distortion and overdrive are perhaps some of the better known and most popular effects associated with the musical styles of the 1960s They were often a result of accidents in which the guitar amplifier or its vacuum tube was damaged Some musicians decided they liked the accidental sound and recorded music that way DISTORTION OVERDRIVE This effect adds sustain additional harmonics and overtones to the signal creating a richer sound sometimes referred to as thick walls of sound There are many levels of distortion and overdrive On one end of the spectrum this effect adds a sort of warmth to the original tone A good example is Chuck Berry s 1955 hit Maybellene In the 1960s this effect permeated the sound of garage bands and psychedelic music At the other extreme distortion and overdrive can create the screaming bite grit and crunch heard in the late 1980s and in genres such as punk industrial grunge and metal FUZZ This pedal creates an even more distorted sound than a standard distortion pedal or overdrive The Rolling Stones I Can t Get No Satisfaction released in 1965 made the fuzz pedal one of the most sought after effects boxes The fuzz effect is also heard in the era famous tunes 2 000 Pound Bee The Ventures 1962 and In A Gadda Da Vida Iron Butterfly 1968 As is often the case this sound was an accidental discovery and the result of faulty recording equipment Nashville session musician Grady Martin discovered the sound while recording Marty Robbins hit Don t Worry Filter Filters in general are circuits that alter the frequency content of signals passing through them Lowpass filters allow frequency below their designed cutoff to pass through and thus reduce the level of higher frequencies highpass filters allow only higher frequencies to pass through The development of filtering effects is closely linked with radio technology and military applications The major concern of these applications was the transmission of the sound content of a person s voice without losing intelligibility and recognisability Eventually this technology was creatively adopted for electronic music experiments

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/stompbox-effects (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Exhibit Gallery
    S T E A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Gallery flickr set 72157628086122891 limit 100 About the Exhibit What is a Stompbox The Birth of Stompboxes Categories of Effects Exhibit

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/stompbox-gallery (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Z.Vex Effects
    in Minneapolis in 2000 Lisa has worked at Z Vex Effects since 2007 and continues to study off and on at the Minnesota School of Botanical Art which both provide a unique blend of art and science She takes inspiration from forests farms and her own backyard the places where she spends most of her free time Hannah Haugberg I am a 25 year old artist born and raised in South Minneapolis Shortly after graduating from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in May 2007 BFA in Graphic Design I joined the Zvex team as a full time pedal painter and in house graphic designer Together with Lisa McGrath I help maintain the art department at Z Vex Effects While studying design at MCAD I envisioned pursuing a higher degree in typographic studies from a university in the Netherlands I was anti band poster inspired by stylized design but rarely a participant It s funny to see how far I ve come I still have a strong passion for mapping and informational graphic systems however it is more of an art form I admire from afar as the music industry is my current area of expertise This flip flop on my life path was unexpected but I couldn t be happier with the result Since early 2008 I ve been fortunate to spend a majority of my time focusing on custom pedal designs A lot of my early pedals were patterns I d been sketching for years but lately I ve started to refine by illustration style and enjoy watching it evolve and take shape I work primarily in lettering enamel and fine grades of glitter Most of these applications are pretty permanent and is difficult to remove once applied to the surface of the enclosure This detail sets artistic limitations however it has taught me to embrace mistakes and proven to reveal some interesting results I love experimenting to achieve different surface textures that later inspire the lettering and overall aesthetic of the pedals I create Since starting college in 2003 my freelance design work revolved around non profits and small businesses while my leisure projects in college normally focused on hand made objects Combining these two into a full time career never entered my mind until the situation presented itself Working for Z Vex is one of the best things that has happened to me Zack essentially allows 100 creative freedom from myself and coworker Any artist will tell you this is the ultimate goal one strives to achieve in a creative position within the workforce I am allowed to push my artistic limitations completely uninhibited and I am grateful for this everyday I enter the office I never thought I d be fortunate to find a job that fully suits my creative needs and desires Jason Myrold During his lunch break between classes in the Spring of 1997 an art student attending the Minneapolis College of Art and Design made a phone call in response to

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/stompbox-zvex (2016-02-18)
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