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  • Museum of Making Music - Manufacturing
    North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Manufacturing Making the Best of It Infantrymen around a GI Steinway Steinway Sons was allowed to produce 500 special GI pianos with an olive drab finish to entertain the troops Despite a ban on production a few manufacturers were given contracts to produce musical instruments for the military The instrument manufacturers who survived the Crash and endured the Great Depression found themselves marching to the music of rationing and regulation during World War II The number of piano makers dropped from 125 in 1928 to 36 by 1932 as hundreds of small companies failed Many merged with rivals in a bid for survival Those who scraped by relied on invention and ingenuity Musical instrument manufacturers mobilized for the war effort by applying their metal and woodworking abilities to the production of everything from precision altimeters to bomb casings and airplane wings They were so successful that nearly half of the major makers received the official Army Navy E for excellence The music industry s wartime experience

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery3/manufacturing (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - NAMM History
    T E A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy NAMM History A Topsy Turvy Twenty Years During the bleakest years of the Depression NAMM suspended operations for lack of dues paying members The office in New York was closed and the furniture sold to pay the back salary of Executive Secretary Delbert Loomis Luckily the industry band played on as the economy eased and by 1936 NAMM was back in business The 1941 trade show in New York broke all previous records with 174 exhibitors Anxious to beat anticipated war shortages dealers deluged manufacturers with orders Travel restrictions during the war cancelled the NAMM conventions and trade shows from 1942 1945 but the association was kept busy interpreting government regulations and promoting music as a morale builder in winning the war NAMM prepared for post war expansion with convention sessions like Training GIs for Music Stores Retailers were also helped by NAMM s Merchandising Music program initiated in 1947 Overview Gallery

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery3/nammhistory (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Gallery Sponsor
    for machine design and blueprint work in high school served the company well He designed several machines some of which are still in use today In 1951 when Jesse Babbitt died of a heart condition Bud became a partner in the business with Jesse s wife and brother In 1959 he purchased the company outright During his 67 years with the company Bud worked every station of the manufacturing process including lathe buffing inspecting shipping sales design and delivery He is a born problem solver who is known for making special accommodations so that everyone can enjoy making music Bud once developed a mouthpiece that would allow a stroke victim to play a saxophone even though a portion of his mouth was paralyzed Bud Reglein retired three years ago but remains active in the business which is also owned and managed by his son Bill The younger Reglein who was a delivery driver while in high school official joined the company in 1971 after a tour of duty in the Air Force Like his father Bill Reglein has worked every operation in the company and problem solves with special mouthpieces for special circumstances Helping people keep playing their instruments is what jj Babbitt is all about Bill emphasized The company moved from its garage location in 1950 and again in 1981 Today jj Babbitt employs 42 people and produces over 300 000 mouthpieces annually using process that for the most part have not changed in 80 years When it comes to quality craftsmanship and value jj Babbitt is legendary The company is the only mouthpiece manufacturer that molds its own hard rubber mouthpieces in house in order to maintain complete control over the quality these products The majority of jj Babbitt s mouthpieces are made of plastic although rubber and

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery3/sponsor (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Popular Music
    Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Popular Music From Placid to Acid The arrival of rock and roll blew the lush orchestrations of the early 1950s popular music off the stage Elvis Presley gyrated on stage to give millions of teenage girls a shot of rhythm and blues mixed with good ole boy delivery Groups like Bill Haley and the Comets the Beach Boys and the Supremes soon followed becoming household names Guitar sales climbed Then came the Beatles in 1964 Their creativity wit and charm generated often hysterical enthusiasm Guitars amps and drums flew out the doors of music stores to outfit thousands of garage bands started by teenagers wanting to create their own piece of British sound At the same time the folk movement pushed acoustic guitar and harmonica sales to new heights By the late 1960s the psychedelic sounds that originated in San Francisco climaxed with Jimi Hendrix s blistering electric guitar rendition of The Star Spangled Banner played to thousands of flower children in the muddy fields of Woodstock New York Rock and roll was here to stay providing the music products industry with a lucrative

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/popularmusic (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Innovations
    1969 The music products industry has produced many technical innovations over the years It has also been influenced by innovations created outside the industry Sample sounds of some key innovations from 1910 to 1929 Fender Telecaster Guitar introduced as the Broadcaster in 1950 Fender Precision Electric Bass introduced in 1951 Gibson Les Paul Guitar introduced in 1952 Wurlizter Electric Piano 1952 Echoplex Echo Effect c 1963 Remo Weather King Drumhead

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/innovations (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Music Retail
    Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Retail Who s Minding the Store The 1950s and 1960s broke all retail sales records Large established music stores opened branches in the suburbs and dozens of young men and women with a background in music opened their own stores They all rode the crest of the baby boom a healthy economy good school music programs and a revolution in popular music In 1956 a typical music store grossed 75 260 annually Television sets replaced appliances as a major stock item and spinet pianos proved popular for new suburban homes High fidelity record players sheet music and records all sold well Band instrument dealers thrived on instrument rentals for school music but the most lucrative of all products was the Hammond easy play chord organ Most stores were full line dealers until the Beatles hit town In the 1960s old line stores such as Grinnell Bros were slow to adapt to new trends or to cater to long haired teenagers looking for electric guitars and amplifiers They lost market share to hundreds of new

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/retail (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Marketing
    had two main refrains every family needs a piano in the home and every child should be enrolled in school music Local newspapers and the radio were the advertising media of choice and dealer sponsored school instrument rental programs were the mechanism for drawing children into music Band clinics sponsored by manufacturers also emerged as an important way to promote school music The Olds Band Instrument Company was the first to use such a program but others soon followed Well known musicians such as Rafael Mendez and Doc Severinsen were often hired by manufacturers to visit their dealers The visiting artist gave demonstrations talked to parents and kids and played with the school band inspiring thousands of children to take up a musical instrument Advertising was aimed at middle class families during this period It emphasized the importance of music to a child s future A Renaissance in Music Education Cary High School Band 1962 Music camps competitions regional clinics and all state band and orchestra programs helped draw millions of students into music Manufacturers and dealers worked together to support music in the schools during the 1950s and 1960s As they perfected the instrument rental program the number of

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/marketing (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Distribution
    Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Distribution The Times They Are A Changin UPS Trucks at West Music Company 1969 The advent of United Parcel Service UPS in the late 1960s meant that dealers no longer depended on large orders to get low freight rates Instead they could place smaller orders more often Large distributors with slow fill rates lost market share to more efficient competitors Dozens of established distributors handled product for American manufacturers in the early 1950s and played a key role in the music industry Distributors carried a wide variety of instruments gave liberal credit terms took small orders and advised young dealers on everything from store layout to promotional ideas Their road reps were generally friendly and helpful Then a booming market and changes in technology thinned the ranks United Postal Service UPS and Wide Area Telephone Service WATS lines accelerated processing and left some distributors in the dust Catalog houses and big volume retailers started buying direct from manufacturers Some manufacturers had grown so large they created their own cost effective distribution systems Many wholesalers were left with only accessories and some European imports The most ambitious such as MIDCO International St

    Original URL path: https://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/distribution (2016-02-18)
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