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  • Midwest PARC - Chesterton, Indiana (2007) Meeting
    raccoons and turtle conservation Building a Better Ditch a Ravenswood Media documentary Natural Areas Association newsletter article about prescribed fire and herps Midwest PARC Products Blanding s Turtle Field Herpetology Etiquette Fire and Herps Habitat Management Guidelines Raccoons and Herps Research Literature Research Needs Turtle Regulations Midwest PARC Essentials About Midwest PARC Join Midwest PARC Contact Midwest PARC Midwest PARC on Google Groups Midwest PARC on Facebook Midwest PARC Ecoregions

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/meetings/2007/ (2016-02-01)
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  • Midwest PARC - Carbondale, Illinois (2006) Meeting
    raccoons and turtle conservation Building a Better Ditch a Ravenswood Media documentary Natural Areas Association newsletter article about prescribed fire and herps Midwest PARC Products Blanding s Turtle Field Herpetology Etiquette Fire and Herps Habitat Management Guidelines Raccoons and Herps Research Literature Research Needs Turtle Regulations Midwest PARC Essentials About Midwest PARC Join Midwest PARC Contact Midwest PARC Midwest PARC on Google Groups Midwest PARC on Facebook Midwest PARC Ecoregions

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/meetings/2006/ (2016-02-01)
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  • Midwest PARC Information
    Newsletter Blanding s Turtle Conservation Assessment Released Illinois Meeting Highlights Spring 2010 Newsletter Toledo Blade article on raccoons and turtle conservation Building a Better Ditch a Ravenswood Media documentary Natural Areas Association newsletter article about prescribed fire and herps Midwest PARC Products Blanding s Turtle Field Herpetology Etiquette Fire and Herps Habitat Management Guidelines Raccoons and Herps Research Literature Research Needs Turtle Regulations Midwest PARC Essentials About Midwest PARC Join

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/species/info/?species (2016-02-01)
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  • Midwest PARC Information
    Conservation Assessment Released Illinois Meeting Highlights Spring 2010 Newsletter Toledo Blade article on raccoons and turtle conservation Building a Better Ditch a Ravenswood Media documentary Natural Areas Association newsletter article about prescribed fire and herps Midwest PARC Products Blanding s Turtle Field Herpetology Etiquette Fire and Herps Habitat Management Guidelines Raccoons and Herps Research Literature Research Needs Turtle Regulations Midwest PARC Essentials About Midwest PARC Join Midwest PARC Contact Midwest

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/species/info/?listing (2016-02-01)
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  • Midwest PARC Information
    all female morphs and their offspring are triploid and based on observations of lampbrush chromosomes it was proposed that pre meiotic chromosomal duplication and gynogenesis was a mechanism explaining the perpetuation of the all female triploid lineages Under this hypothesis sperm from spermatophores deposited by males activate the unreduced eggs but normally do not fertilize them Several exceptions to this scenario have been reported including unisexual tetraploid and pentaploids that result from fertilization rather than simple activation of unreduced triploid ova Diploid unisexual salamanders also occur In the United States unisexual hybrids are distributed sporadically throughout east central Illinois Indiana most of Ohio northern Kentucky Wisconsin southern Michigan Connecticut Massachusetts New York northern New Jersey northern Minnesota Maine Vermont and New Hampshire Unisexual hybrids will breed in fishless ponds in a variety of wooded and semi wooded habitats including ponds wetlands ditches and sloughs Unisexual hybrid adults are found in upland forests as well as bottomland forests often associated with sandy soils They may remain near the surface most of the year until late autumn Because of their genetic complexity these animals are not accommodated under either biological or evolutionary species concepts However as of 2002 unisexual hybrids continue to be recognized as animals Of Special Concern in Connecticut and as Endangered in Illinois and New Jersey Habitat in Focus Next Midwest PARC Meeting Read about the 2015 MWPARC annual meeting Midwest PARC News Annual Meeting Summary Summer 2012 Newsletter Habitat Management Guidelines Winter 2011 Newsletter Fall 2010 Newsletter Blanding s Turtle Conservation Assessment Released Illinois Meeting Highlights Spring 2010 Newsletter Toledo Blade article on raccoons and turtle conservation Building a Better Ditch a Ravenswood Media documentary Natural Areas Association newsletter article about prescribed fire and herps Midwest PARC Products Blanding s Turtle Field Herpetology Etiquette Fire and Herps Habitat

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/species/info/?ambystomatids (2016-02-01)
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  • Midwest PARC Information
    greatest conservation need This results in a regional conservation concern score 75 high 50 74 medium high 25 49 medium low 50 high Rank Codes Category A species High Regional Concern High Regional Responsibility are listed in 75 of the MW State Wildlife Action Plans and 50 of the US range occurs in the MW Category B species High Regional Concern Low Regional Responsibility are listed in 75 of the MW State Wildlife Action Plans and Category C species Medium high Regional Concern High Regional Responsibility are listed in 50 74 of the MW State Wildlife Action Plans and 50 of the US range occurs in the MW Category D species Medium high Regional Concern Low Regional Responsibility are listed in 50 74 of the MW State Wildlife Action Plans and Category E species Medium low Regional Concern High Regional Responsibility are listed in 25 49 of the MW State Wildlife Action Plans and 50 of the US range occurs in the MW Category F species Medium low Regional Concern Low Regional Responsibility are listed in 25 49 of the MW State Wildlife Action Plans and Category G species Low Regional Concern High Regional Responsibility are listed in 50 of the US range occurs in the MW Category H species Low Regional Concern Low Regional Responsibility are listed in Habitat in Focus Next Midwest PARC Meeting Read about the 2015 MWPARC annual meeting Midwest PARC News Annual Meeting Summary Summer 2012 Newsletter Habitat Management Guidelines Winter 2011 Newsletter Fall 2010 Newsletter Blanding s Turtle Conservation Assessment Released Illinois Meeting Highlights Spring 2010 Newsletter Toledo Blade article on raccoons and turtle conservation Building a Better Ditch a Ravenswood Media documentary Natural Areas Association newsletter article about prescribed fire and herps Midwest PARC Products Blanding s Turtle Field Herpetology Etiquette Fire and

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/species/info/?rank_matrix (2016-02-01)
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  • Midwest PARC Photographs
    recover Red Bellied Snake Storeria occipitomaculata The Eastern Milk Snake Lampropeltis triangulum was named for the erroneous belief that it milked cows It is often found around barns where it feeds mainly on rodents Long and slender Ribbon Snakes Thamnophis sauritus are found in shallow water wetlands of the Midwest Populations of the Eastern Massasauga Sistrurus catenatus are declining throughout the Midwest Since 1993 the species has been listed as a candidate for protection under the US Endangered Species Act A female Northern Dusky Salamander Desmognathus fuscus tends to her developing eggs The Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus is a rare species in the Midwest limited mainly to heavily forested habitats Some members of the genus Eurycea like this Southern Two lined Salamander Eurycea cirrigera are being utilized as indicators of stream condition and health Cave Salamander Eurycea lucifuga With a long melodius trill this male American Toad Anaxyrus Bufo americanus announces its readiness to breed Strings of eggs laid by American Toads Anaxyrus Bufo americanus will hatch out as tiny black tadpoles Amphibian larvae are an important link in the food web moving energy from the aquatic to the terrestrial ecosystems Racers Coluber constrictor get their name from the speed at which they can move through their grassland habitats Spending most of their lives in trees Gray Treefrogs Hyla versicolor descend to wetlands for breeding in late spring Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina carolina Spiny Softshell Turtle Apalone spinifera Salamander larvae such as this Blue spotted Salamander Ambystoma laterale play an important role in the ecosystem consuming pests such as mosquito larvae and transfering energy from the aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems An overproduction of melanin produces this black Eastern Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis While this mutation can occur anywhere in the western basin of Lake Erie melanistic individuals may make up 50 of the population The Streamside Salamander Ambystoma barbouri has one of the most restricted ranges of any amphibian species in the Midwest The coloration of the Eastern Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis is highly variable The Cricket Frog Acris crepitans has experienced declines throughout much of the Midwest Eastern Fence Lizard Sceloporus consobrinus What s it called In the Midwest many of the salamander species are a mix of genotypes from two or more species of the genus Ambystoma Over 20 of these different biotypes have been identified so far Fowler s Toads Anaxyrus Bufo fowleri prefer areas of sandy soils and breed in temporary pools of water including flooded farm fields American Toads Anaxyrus Bufo americanus are one of the most commonly encountered amphibians in the Midwest Five Lined Skink Plestiodon Eumeces fasciatus Eastern Hognose Snakes Heterodon platirhinos feeds almost exclusively on toads Eastern Fox Snakes Elaphe gloydi are often mistaken for Copperheads Fox Snakes are found only in the Great Lakes region of the Midwest Harbingers of spring Wood Frogs Lithobates Rana sylvaticus often begin calling in late winter even before the ice has fully melted from forested wetlands The Spotted Turtle Clemmys guttata has

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/photo/ (2016-02-01)
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  • Midwest PARC Photographs
    raccoons and turtle conservation Building a Better Ditch a Ravenswood Media documentary Natural Areas Association newsletter article about prescribed fire and herps Midwest PARC Products Blanding s Turtle Field Herpetology Etiquette Fire and Herps Habitat Management Guidelines Raccoons and Herps Research Literature Research Needs Turtle Regulations Midwest PARC Essentials About Midwest PARC Join Midwest PARC Contact Midwest PARC Midwest PARC on Google Groups Midwest PARC on Facebook Midwest PARC Ecoregions

    Original URL path: http://www.mwparc.org/photo/?48 (2016-02-01)
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