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  • Second Half of 2012
    ichthyologist see the AC Vol 38 No 1 September was a month of education and presentations First we returned to Atlanta s South River with a seining demonstration streamside tank and science history talk to a large group of paddlers Later we returned to the Chattahoochee drainage this time to Ivy Creek to lead a group of teachers at the Environmental Education Alliance of Georgia 2013 Outdoor Learning Symposium where

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/ga/GA2012H2.html (2016-02-01)
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  • CHECKLIST OF GEORGIA FW FISHES
    vigilax Popeye shiner Notropis ariommus GA threatened Burrhead shiner Notropis asperifrons Emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides Ironcolor shiner Notropis chalybaeus Rainbow shiner Notropis chrosomus Dusky shiner Notropis cummingsae Redeye chub Notropis harperi GA rare Spottail shiner Notropis hudsonius Highscale shiner Notropis hypsilepsis GA threatened Tennessee shiner Notropis leuciodus Longnose shiner Notropis longirostris Yellowfin shiner Notropis lutipinnis Taillight shiner Notropis maculatus Coastal shiner Notropis petersoni Silver shiner Notropis photogenis GA endangered Sandbar shiner Notropis scepticus GA rare Mirror shiner Notropis spectrunculus Silverstripe shiner Notropis stilbius Telescope shiner Notropis telescopus Weed shiner Notropis texanus Mimic shiner Notropis volucellus Coosa shiner Notropis xaenocephalus Spotfin chub Erimonax monacha Bigeye chub Hybopsis amblops GA rare Lined chub Hybopsis lineapunctata Rosyface chub Hybopsis rubrifrons Coastal chub Hybopsis sp cf winchelli Etowah Chub Hybopsis sp cf winchelli Silverjaw minnow Ericymba buccata Smallmouth buffalo Ictiobus bubalus River carpsucker Carpiodes carpio Quillback Carpiodes cyprinus Highfin carpsucker Carpiodes velifer White sucker Catostomus commersoni Spotted sucker Minytrema melanops Creek chubsucker Erimyzon oblongus Lake chubsucker Erimyzon sucetta Alabama hog sucker Hypentelium etowanum Northern hog sucker Hypentelium nigricans Silver redhorse Moxostoma anisurum River redhorse Moxostoma carinatum GA rare Notchlip redhorse Moxostoma collapsum Black redhorse Moxostoma duquesnei Golden redhorse Moxostoma erythrurum Harelip sucker Moxostoma lacerum extinct Smallmouth redhorse Moxostoma breviceps Blacktail redhorse Moxostoma poecilurum Robust redhorse Moxostoma robustum GA endangered Apalachicola redhorse Moxostoma sp Sicklefin redhorse Moxostoma sp Striped jumprock Scartomyzon rupiscartes Greater jumprock Scartomyzon lachneri Brassy jumprock Scartomyzon sp Blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Snail bullhead Ameiurus brunneus White catfish Ameiurus catus Black bullhead Ameiurus melas Yellow bullhead Ameiurus natalis Brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus Flat bullhead Ameiurus platycephalus Spotted bullhead Ameiurus serracanthus GA rare Flathead catfish Pylodictis olivaris Mountain madtom Noturus eleutherus GA threatened Yellowfin madtom Noturus flavipinnis Black madtom Noturus funebris GA rare Tadpole madtom Noturus gyrinus Margined madtom Noturus insignis Speckled madtom Noturus leptacanthus Freckled madtom Noturus nocturnus GA endangered Coosa madtom Noturus sp cf munitus GA endangered Pirate perch Aphredoderus sayanus Swampfish Chologaster cornuta Southern cavefish Typhlichthys subterraneus GA rare Stippled studfish Fundulus bifax GA endangered Northern studfish Fundulus catenatus GA threatened Golden topminnow Fundulus chrysotus Banded topminnow Fundulus cingulatus GA rare Eastern starhead topminnow Fundulus escambiae Lined topminnow Fundulus lineolatus Blackspotted topminnow Fundulus olivaceus Bayou killifish Fundulus pulvereus Southern studfish Fundulus stellifer Sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus Bluefin killifish Lucania goodei GA unusual Rainwater killifish Lucania parva Pygmy killifish Leptolucania ommata Sailfin molly Poecilia latipinna Western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis Eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki Mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola Striped mullet Mugil cephalus Least killifish Heterandria formosa Brook silverside Labidesthes sicculus Inland silverside Menidia beryllina Atlantic needlefish Stronglyura marina Banded sculpin Cottus carolinae Smoky sculpin Cottus sp cf bairdi Coosa banded sculpin Cottus sp cf carolinae Tallapoosa sculpin Cottus sp Chattahoochee sculpin Cottus sp Striped bass Morone saxatilis Everglades pygmy sunfish Elassoma evergladei Bluebarred pygmy sunfish Elassoma okatie Okefenokee pygmy sunfish Elassoma okefenokee Banded pygmy sunfish Elassoma zonatum Flier Centrarchus macropterus White crappie Poxomis annularis Black crappie Poxomis nigromaculatus Shadow bass Ambloplites ariommus Mud sunfish Acantharchus pomotis Rock bass Ambloplites

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/ga/ga_fw_fishes.htm (2016-02-01)
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  • NANFA's Regional Chapters by Elmer Guerri
    and some success with hornwort he hopes to pick up some pointers for growing Vallisneria and Sagittaria in the future Input from members like Sutor help identify programs for future Chapter meetings Sutor believes that all NANFA members have an obligation to educate the public and to assist others who are interested in native fishes He is impressed with the City of Chicago s Bank Angling program which teaches youngsters the joys of fishing without the need for expensive boats rods reels and so forth Sutor hopes a similar native fish appreciation program might be developed to teach fish observation and appreciation It s just a lot of fun Not every Regional Chapter has the privilege of having among its members someone like Larry Page of the Illinois Natural History Survey and author of the Peterson Field Guide to Fishes of North America Larry brings much to the Chapter and has enthusiasm for what he himself derives from NANFA Non professionals often spend a lot more time working on behalf of the environment that do professional fish people Larry remarked They have more time and they often have particular interests I spend a lot of time trying to get people interested in native fishes to get them to understand what native fishes require in the way of streams and so on Developing awareness of conservation and of the environment is one of the main reasons I am involved One of Larry s contributions to the Regional Chapter has been his video presentations on native fish spawning behavior in natural streams This allowed Chapter members an opportunity to observe behavior we otherwise would not have been able to see One of Larry s videotapes shows rosefin shiners Lythrurus ardens spawning over abandoned nests of hornyhead chubs Nocomis biguttatus We were fascinated with the detail and the scope of that footage and on a subsequent trip to Lost River we observed that same behavior in person Larry advises people both professionals and non professionals to get involved in NANFA especially in Regional Chapter activities I think understanding the diversity of nature is great fun With any group of organisms it s great fun to discover how many there are going different places doing different things It s just a lot of fun Larry believes in learning and in getting wet as he puts it Anyone attending an Illinois Indiana Regional Chapter field trip will easily recognize Larry He will be the one on the business end of the seine or net kicking and sloshing below snags and logs all the while laughing and along with other members enjoying the experience to its fullest I like to see the diversity in our country Larry routinely involves students from classes at the Illinois Natural History Survey in NANFA and Regional Chapter activities One of his students Ralph Steinberg was most impressed with a presentation to one of Page s university classes by NANFA members Kon Schmidt and Rat Katula Ray talked about his experiences

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/il_in/ind-ill98.htm (2016-02-01)
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  • tn
    species in the Embarass River in southeast Illinois The trip was in conjunction with Dr Larry Page s survey of the two rivers which will provide data for the third edition of The Fishes of Illinois scheduled completion in 2005 Sajjad Lateef IL took a bunch of photos of the trip and posted them on the Web no longer available Right now Elmer s planning a 3 day mini convention

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/il_in/il_in_jun00.html (2016-02-01)
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  • NANFA (IL-IN) Outreach Activities in June 2005
    Park June 19 2005 Meet the Creek During the Springbrook event Chris Oszak of the Salt Creek Watershet Network invited NANFA to participate in the Meet the Creek event in Brookfield IL The event was held on Sunday June 19 from 11 00 am to 2 00 pm at the Brookfield Kiwanis Park NANFA members Scott Davis and Sajjad Lateef sampled Salt Creek section in Brookfield IL south of the Zoo Brookfield Kiwanis Park The fish collected were set up for a native fish display at the Meet the Creek event organized by the Salt Creek Watershed Network and The Village of Brookfield We found lots and lots of Rusty Crayfish dominant species bluntnose fathead minnows some adults with breeding tubercles and YOY blackstripe minnows adults and YOY a silvery shiner with deeply forked tail guess golden shiner and what could have been YOY creek chubs The creek was very cloudy and had deep pockets of mud on either side that released Hydrogen Sulphide gas when disturbed There was debris riprap on the edges of the stream that made it difficult to collect We did not see different habitats where we were Also the hydrogen sulphide pockets deterred us from sampling the edges Most of the fish we collected was in the central part of the stream in about four foot deep channel gravel bottom some current Given that we had a 8ft seine in a 30 foot wide stream I am pretty sure that many fish just laughed and swam around us There were some inverts in the stream dragonfly larvae asian clams and native mussels including Thumbnail clams No emergent aquatic growth or submersed plants Some duckweed floating on the surface along with some small oil slicks We setup a display at the Meet the Creek event and

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/il_in/june2005/june2005.html (2016-02-01)
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  • IL-IN NANFA Activity : April 22, 2006
    good day for collecting In a couple of hours of seining the heavily managed Elk Grove Village section of Salt Creek we managed to collect several species Also seen but not caught was a huge carp that left a wake as it swam away from us The main section of the creek was channelized shallow and straight stream bed with almost no structure to speak of and the edges stablized with concrete structures meshed together The houses lining the creek had neatly trimmed lawn edging all the way up to the creek edge All in all the creek was the epitome of a neat managed creek But to the credit of the homeowners some were making efforts to provide shelter for the fish by submerging woodbranches lashed together We collected most of the fish from the vicinity of these structures and from places where branches had fallen in and created a reef of sorts We also got a lot of young fish from the side creeks which were still relatively untouched We got a chance to chat with several people about native fish A lot of young children stopped by to see us seine fish up including one little boy

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/il_in/apr2006/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Village of Brookfield "Meet The Creek" June 18, 2006
    and Sajjad Lateef along with members of the Green Water Aquarists Society and the Chicago Killifish Association George Fryk and others sampled the section of Salt Creek The fish and invertebrates collected were setup in a native fish display Given that this was the second year that we were participating in the event at around the same time of the year it was instructive to see the changes in the stream and compare them to what we observed last year The water was marginally better at least no more oil slicks were observed It still was murky and showed the classic attributes of an urban stream There were large pockets of Hydrogen Sulphide in the stream substrate which were disturbed when we collected Fewer crayfish mostly Rusty crayfish and also a single specimen of another crayfish and more fish were collected this year which is more indicative of better collecting tools than of stream quality We collected pretty much the same species as last year However this year we were able to take better pictures and several photographs are shown below The only surprises were a single speciment of Orangespot Sunfish juvenile Johnny darters and a White Sucker A complete

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/il_in/june2006/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Bill Yard IL IN NANFA members We found the following fish Stonecat Slenderhead darter Smallmouth bass Rock bass Largemouth bass Longear sunfish Red shiner Spotfin shiner Redfin shiner Carmine shiner Bluntnose minnow Blackstripe topminnow Brook silverside Northern pike Channel catfish

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/il_in/july2006/index.html (2016-02-01)
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