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  • summer 96 collecting in OR
    prickly sculpin Cottus asper We also collected native noble crayfish Pacifasticus leniusculus and the exotic red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii We didn t find any redbreast sunfish Click thumbnail image to view a larger image Before sampling Cox Ck Dan Logan demonstrated the use of the electroshocker NANFA members Joe Middleton Pat McDonald Norm Edelen Dan Logan and Rachel Lusby along with some friends sampling Cox Creek The green sunfish and bluegills were found in different habitats we found green sunfish in shallower water among bank vegetation and boulders and bluegills were generally in open water The largemouth bass were found with the bluegills Redside shiners were found only in the clearer faster moving water Green sunfish yellow bullhead The Calapooia River at its confluence with Willamette River was the next site we visited We first sampled the river 100 upstream of the Willamette where it was about 40 ft wide and too deep to sample all the way across The substrate was silt sand and gravel We used a ten ft seine in shallow water and threw a cast net into deeper sections collecting the following species white crappie Pomoxis annularis northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis largescale sucker Catostomus macrocheilus largemouth bass bluegill mosquitofish Gambusia affinis redside shiner chislemouth Acrocheilus alutaceus and threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus Sampling the Calapooia River are Dan Logan and some other poor seine puller The rest of the gang are taking it easy Redside shiner chiselmouth and Northern squawfish The Willamette River at the mouth of the Calapooia River was fast and had gravel and cobble substrate In the swift knee deep water we collected northern squawfish largescale sucker redside shiner speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus and longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae Threespine stickleback and mosquitofish were abundant in the calm water along the shore Dan Logan

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/or_wa/95-96/orsumm96.htm (2016-02-01)
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  • Summer 95 collecting
    a fishing pier yielded many Pacific staghorn sculpin shiner surfperch and speckled sanddab the 3 most common estuarine fish we sampled Pacific staghorn sculpin The second site of the day was several miles upstream at C D Dock a private boat dock The water was too deep to sample with seines so Dan used a cast net from the dock and collected two species redside shiner and threespine stickleback Redside shiners were especially abundant at the site Anglers at the dock told us that they had caught chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki and Umpqua squawfish Ptychocheilus umpquae at this site earlier in the day Typically minnows are uncommon in estuarine sites but both the redside shiners and squawfish are commonly collected in the estuary of the Siuslaw River Dan Logan throwing a cast net at the boat dock And the result a netful of redside shiners and threespine sticklebacks Redside shiner The third site Farnham Landing was the last site within significant tidal influence Here the river was about 100 feet wide and shallow enough to seine though the many boulders made seining difficult We collected several American shad Alossa sapidissima Umpqua squawfish redside shiner speckled dace largescale sucker prickly sculpin reticulate sculpin and coastrange sculpin Cottus aleuticus The speckled dace we collected was the blacklined form Rhinichthys osculus nubilus The blacklined speckled dace differs from the typical speckled dace by having a heavy black line on its lateral flank instead of typical overall speckling The water level rose while we were sampling this site making the return trip across the river challenging Nimble footwork was necessary as we balanced on submerged boulders which had been above water only a short time before Upper Siuslaw River Speckled dace sorry rather blurry Reticulate sculpin The last two sites one on the Siuslaw and the final one on a tributary called Lake Creek contained abundant crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and we collected many of the bright red crustaceans in our net Fish species were similar to those from the third site save the American shad When we quit the sun had already dropped below the tops of the trees around Lake Creek It had been a long and rewarding day Net of suckers dace and crayfish from the final site sampled on the Siuslaw River Trip 3 Sauvie Island Sauvie Island is located at the confluence of the Columbia River and the Willamette River about 10 miles north of Portland Sauvie Island is large about 15 miles long and 4 5 miles wide with several shallow lakes and ponds most of which are connected by sloughs Originally the island flooded frequently but flood control dams on the Columbia and Willamette rivers and dikes on the island have reduced flooding One dike closed the upstream facing slough on the island and siltation of the ponds is now a problem The downstream facing sloughs are still open and the water level in the lakes is affected by daily tidal activity The Oregon

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/or_wa/95-96/summer95.htm (2016-02-01)
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  • Second Half of 2012
    Conservation aquaculture is being proposed as an option for increasing numbers of rare species where populations are critically low Additionally fish transfers are being explored as an option to expand the range of rare species within river systems where dams block migrations For my part of the project I am currently culturing Banded Killifish Fundulus diaphanus a state Special Concern species in aquaria Though the information being gleaned from raising

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/wi/WI2012H2.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Reaching Out: Notes from NANFA's Regional Outreach Program - Summer 2005
    found After scouting out a potential native fish reintroduction site we headed to the Virgin River This spring saw a rather large flood event and the river was still significantly higher than normal This was a very angry looking river that was uncrossable with 3 4 foot high standing waves and extremely turbid water Jim Heinrich was hoping the high flow had knocked back the invasive red shiner populations and flushed a few natives downstream from Utah But alas all we found were red shiner with a typical haul producing 50 100 individuals No natives at all were collected I put pictures from the trip online at www peter unmack net trips The next trip will be October 14 15 2005 and will be our 10th annual trip to Ash Meadows home of a number of pupfish subspecies Cyprinodon nevadensis and the most famous of all the Devils Hole pupfish C diabolis This trip provides a chance to visit and see up close the inhabitants of the dozen or so larger springs that comprise this amazing desert oasis We welcome any out of town visitors and will assist anyone with transportation and accommodations should they wish to fly out Please contact Peter Unmack or full details can be found at www pupfish net dsac MS 25 April Tyler Strange LA assisted instructors in an Ecological Resources course for federal employees The field and classroom course was held at Tara Wildlife where Tyler has conducted floodplain pool research for the past two summers Tyler demonstrated different types of sampling gear and helped identify fishes Field sites included a large floodplain pond with abundant larval gar and young of year flier and some small permanent pools with impressive populations of golden topminnow bantam sunfish and young of year bowfin 17 June Joseph

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/reaching_out/2005_summer.shtml (2016-02-01)
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  • Reaching Out: Notes from NANFA's Regional Outreach Program - Spring 2005
    will provide big benefits A few examples A copy of American Currents at a local library nature center or other public facility is an excellent way to introduce the native fish world and the NANFA organization can help you obtain the copies to support such a program If public speaking is of interest slide shows featuring native fishes and habitat information find a ready audience at the local aquarium club as well as 4H and other nature oriented organizations These groups are always looking for interesting speakers Contact us for help in obtaining the necessary materials If it s legal in your region provide a pair or two of aquarium friendly native fishes to the local aquarium club auction Be sure to include a NANFA membership form along with the fish Of course none of these actions will independently have a significant impact but taken together the impact can be surprising and the members of the Desert Fishes Council are busily planning another weekend in the deserts of Nevada to clear exotics from some of our most important and fragile ecosystems Usually occurring in May this notice may not reach you in time to participate in the outing this spring However the annual October trip to Ash Meadows is also being planned and will give you plenty of time to plan your participation in this most important activity Please contact Peter directly for additional information The Hillsboro County Florida Cooperative Extension a University of Florida and Hillsboro County natural history oriented complex serves the greater Tampa area This excellent facility is a central resource combining a natural history museum and educational demonstrations primarily aimed at primary and secondary students The Cooperative installed a pond in their newly constructed commons area and asked NANFA s Central Florida Region for ideas on

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/reaching_out/2005_spring.shtml (2016-02-01)
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  • Reaching Out: Notes from NANFA's Regional Outreach Program - Winter 2005
    the details Every year Jenny gives our upper Midwest members a great opportunity to sample the native fauna of Minnesota If interested contact Jenny at Peter Unmack has led yet another Ash Meadows trip to help rid the habitat of exotic fishes He reports The Ash Meadows trip was another great success with our attendees having a great time Attendance was a little smaller this trip but it worked out great with us splitting into three groups and fanning out across Ash Meadows setting traps and pulling cattails The weather was perfect on Friday while it got a little windier on Saturday Friday night Ellen Siegal cooked a delightful meal with some extra goodies provided by Kaz Webster The refuge staff joined us for dinner too Pictures from the trip are available online at http www peter unmack net trips A total of 2837 exotics were removed The break down of that number is 1532 Gambusia 389 mollies 81 convict cichlids 313 crayfish 520 bullfrog tadpoles and two adult bullfrogs All in all exotic populations were down a little bit refuge staff have been working at trapping more regularly Most of the spring pools we have worked on regularly remained free of cattail while Fairbanks Pool needed about a dozen plants pulled We also did some additional clean up of cattails at Kings Pool We look forward to seeing everyone again in the spring on our next trip This ongoing and productive effort demonstrates one of the many ways that NANFA members through their actions promote the essential tenets of our organization Peter s efforts to rid the desert habitat of exotic fishes are worthy of all our support Join the effort and as an extra bonus enjoy the satisfaction that comes from participating in a good cause Members of

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/reaching_out/2005_winter.shtml (2016-02-01)
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  • Reaching Out: Notes from NANFA's Regional Outreach Program - Fall 2004
    to the Chester River area of Queen Anne s County The trip included instruction on collecting techniques seining dipnetting and angling Bob always stresses habitat protection He cautions his group that only the most abundant species like sunfishes or channel catfish should be taken and that less abundant or threatened species simply be observed photographed and released Bob s approach to collecting and promoting conservation is the best advertisement for NANFA and embodies our principals in a real life experience Ray Wolff Wisconsin reports on extensive activities in his region The Central Wisconsin Aquarium Society CWAS held its annual collecting trip in July this year near Stevens Point in the center of the state The outing included canoeing collecting swimming and picnicking The Wisconsin Area Killifish Organization also held its annual collecting picnic event in July this year at the Muckwanago River a shallow crystal clear river that offers light fishing and collecting Ray is scheduled to speak at the WAKO convention in November on the subject of keeping killies mostly North American ones indoors and out The WAKO show and auction features a very good selection of North American killies Todd Crail Ohio reports that NANFA helped lead seining demonstrations at the Rocky River Festival in the Cleveland Participants were taken to the Rocky River site where NANFA members displayed and discussed the fishes caught There were perhaps 100 people half of whom were children Eighteen species were seen among which was one very gentle northern hog sucker that allowed the children to get up close and personal On October 9th and 10th Ohio NANFA ran a Fall Colors sample of one of Ohio s most bio diverse streams the stream of the Central Till Plains flowing into the Scioto River While a good proportion of folks were NANFA

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/reaching_out/2004_fall.shtml (2016-02-01)
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  • Reaching Out: Notes from NANFA's Regional Outreach Program - Summer 2004
    not allowed to sell barter or convert to private use the fishes collected Since the permit is only good for the month of May at least two outings weather permitting are planned It s difficult for Jenny to construct a firm schedule so she contacts likely participants as the collecting time draws near Her invitation letter recommends supplies and gear for the trip expected weather conditions and other relevant information Although the invitation goes out to NANFA members all over Minnesota many live too far away to attend and the members in academia are often loaded with grading finals that month As a result just a few NANFA members typically attend but these are joined by members of the Minnesota Aquarium Society likely recruits for NANFA once they collect their first darter Jenny reports that many aquarium society members have never held a seine net or seen a darter before It must be great fun to introduce them not only to this marvelous activity but also to the beautiful world of native fishes The darters commonly collected include johnny darter Etheostoma nigrum banded darter E zonale fantail darter E flabellare rainbow darter E caeruleum Iowa darter Etheostoma exile slenderhead darter Percina phoxocephala logperch P caprodes and blackside darter P maculata Jenny s work is an example of the Outreach Program at its best Virtually every goal of the program is met in this activity contacts with the professional and environmental communities liaison with local organizations that may provide future members introducing the uninitiated to the joys of collecting and increasing the awareness and appreciation of both our native fish fauna and the NANFA organization We should consider Jenny s region a prototype for the rest of the Outreach Program Great work Jenny And thanks Meanwhile in the desert southwest Peter

    Original URL path: http://nanfa.org/NANFAregions/reaching_out/2004_summer.shtml (2016-02-01)
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