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  • Retirement Savings
    Benefits At A Glance Optional Benefits Business Resources Experts Education Personal Home Member Badges Your Business Grants and Scholarships Growth Grant Recipients Dependents Scholarship Recipients Partners And Sponsors Affiliate Application Refer A Friend NASE in Action NASE Advocacy Efforts Legislative Priorities NASE In The News Washington Watch NASE Research Current NASE Survey NASE Member Survey NASE Issue Reports Self Employed Statistics Get Involved Tell your story Become a Media Contact Legislative Action Center Business Help Ask the Experts Taxes Business Strategy Business Law Marketing 101 Finance Accounting Health Care Reform Marketing Advertising Real Estate Information Technology NASE Minute Get Help Tax Healthcare Reform Health Marketing 101 Business Management Marketing Advertising Real Estate Calculators Business Breakeven Analysis Calculator Cash Flow Calculator Equipment Buy vs Lease Investment Annual Rate of Return Calculator Mortgage Mortgage Loan Calculator Retirement Savings and Planning 401 k Calculator How long will my retirement savings last Tax 1040 Tax Calculator Payroll Deductions Calculator Self Employment Tax Calculator Helpful Links ASBDC Member Directory Search My NASE About Me Account Benefits Optional Benefits Payment Details Expert Questions Email Subscriptions Membership Directory Tax Videos Your resource for small business tax advice View all NASE news Retirement Savings Tuesday March 29 2011

    Original URL path: http://selfemployed.nase.org/business-help/get-help/tax/tax-videos/2011/03/29/Retirement_Savings (2016-02-14)
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  • Independent Contractor
    Benefits At A Glance Optional Benefits Business Resources Experts Education Personal Home Member Badges Your Business Grants and Scholarships Growth Grant Recipients Dependents Scholarship Recipients Partners And Sponsors Affiliate Application Refer A Friend NASE in Action NASE Advocacy Efforts Legislative Priorities NASE In The News Washington Watch NASE Research Current NASE Survey NASE Member Survey NASE Issue Reports Self Employed Statistics Get Involved Tell your story Become a Media Contact Legislative Action Center Business Help Ask the Experts Taxes Business Strategy Business Law Marketing 101 Finance Accounting Health Care Reform Marketing Advertising Real Estate Information Technology NASE Minute Get Help Tax Healthcare Reform Health Marketing 101 Business Management Marketing Advertising Real Estate Calculators Business Breakeven Analysis Calculator Cash Flow Calculator Equipment Buy vs Lease Investment Annual Rate of Return Calculator Mortgage Mortgage Loan Calculator Retirement Savings and Planning 401 k Calculator How long will my retirement savings last Tax 1040 Tax Calculator Payroll Deductions Calculator Self Employment Tax Calculator Helpful Links ASBDC Member Directory Search My NASE About Me Account Benefits Optional Benefits Payment Details Expert Questions Email Subscriptions Membership Directory Tax Videos Your resource for small business tax advice View all NASE news Independent Contractor Tuesday March 29 2011

    Original URL path: http://selfemployed.nase.org/business-help/get-help/tax/tax-videos/2011/03/29/Independent_Contractor (2016-02-14)
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  • Small Business Jobs Act Of 2010 Vs. HRA 105 [Ask The Experts Q&A]
    Advice and information on small business health insurance coverage Small Business Jobs Act Of 2010 Vs HRA 105 Ask The Experts Q A Thursday October 20 2011 Q Today I read NASE President Kristie Arslan s testimony to the Senate Committee on Small Business Entrepreneurship regarding extending the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 I am curious to know what the difference is between the Small Jobs Act of 2010 and the HRA 105 benefit I do not fully understand the Act but I do have a pretty good grasp on the HRA 105 and to me they sound very similar A The Small Business Job Act of 2010 was a comprehensive act that affected many more areas than just health care costs but I assume you are interested in how the bill s provisions affect the use of an HRA 105 One key provision of the bill was the expansion of the Self Employed Health Insurance Deduction Before this bill the Self Employed Health Insurance Deduction was only available on page one of your form 1040 so that the premiums were only useful in reducing taxable income for federal income tax but did nothing to reduce taxable earnings for Self Employment Tax The Small Business Jobs Act extended the deduction to Self Employment Tax as well but only for the 2010 tax year One of the benefits of an HRA plan does something similar to that particular part of the Small Business Job Act in that having an HRA 105 plan in effect makes those premiums deductible for SE tax purposes by moving that deduction from page one of your 1040 over to your Schedule C But the HRA 105 plan is not limited to just the health insurance premiums With and HRA 105 not only premiums can be

    Original URL path: http://selfemployed.nase.org/business-help/get-help/health/health-blog/self-made/2011/10/20/Small_Business_Jobs_Act_Of_2010_Vs_HRA_105_Ask_The_Experts_Q_A (2016-02-14)
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  • Still Doing 2010 Taxes And Trying To Obtain Health Insurance Deduction [Ask The Experts Q & A]
    Benefits Payment Details Expert Questions Email Subscriptions Membership Directory NASE Health Blog Advice and information on small business health insurance coverage Still Doing 2010 Taxes And Trying To Obtain Health Insurance Deduction Ask The Experts Q A Wednesday August 31 2011 Q I am doing my 2010 taxes and told my tax preparer about the one time business deduction for health insurance premiums for 2010 However she still records it as an adjustment to income How do I convince her that this is okay for 2010 A The IRS accounted for the new deductibility differently than most people expected The deduction for federal income tax is still accounted for in the same way as in previous years by including the qualified premiums on page one of Form 1040 Line 29 This is an adjustment to income as you mentioned and is indeed the same as in previous years so that part of your tax preparer s efforts is most likely correct The new part for 2010 is that the deduction is also eligible for reducing Self Employment Tax The SE tax deduction is the new part and is accounted for separately on Schedule SE Self Employment Tax The amount that is included on Line 29 will also be used in the calculation at Line 3 on the Schedule SE So take a look at the Schedule SE and make sure that you see that the total includes the deduction from page one of the 1040 I know it is kind of weird since the amount isn t listed separately but Line 3 just says Combine lines 1a 1b and 2 Subtract from that total the amount on Form 1040 Line 29 so you have to just make sure that the amount was deducted in computing the amount on line 3

    Original URL path: http://selfemployed.nase.org/business-help/get-help/health/health-blog/self-made/2011/08/31/Still_Doing_2010_Taxes_And_Trying_To_Obtain_Health_Insurance_Deduction_Ask_The_Experts_Q_A (2016-02-14)
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  • A Primer On Health Insurance Exchanges
    are 347 pages and address exchange regulation and risk regulation for these markets The states have flexibility in setting up exchanges as long as the exchanges approve only qualified health plans which contain the required essential benefits Some argue that this makes the exchanges very flexible Others agree if the definition of choice is either expensive or very expensive insurance Getting past the debate what are some things we learn from the proposed regulations The most significant rule deals with when an individual or small group can enroll in a plan A concern of many has been that since a pre existing condition is not a bar to acquiring coverage a highly touted feature of the PPACA people will wait until they are sick to purchase insurance If they don t get sick in a given year they will opt to just pay the penalty which will pale in comparison to the cost of qualified coverage This would create the dreaded adverse selection that drives premium costs up there being few well people paying premiums but large numbers of sick people undergoing expensive treatment and driving premiums higher in what could quickly become an unmanageable cycle The regulations clarify that exchanges will have open enrollment periods once a year between October 15 and December 7 Therefore unless you qualify for a special enrollment period examples include birth marriage losing other qualified coverage gaining citizenship you will not be able to wait until you need coverage and then buy it The PPACA provided that carriers while being forced to cover all pre existing conditions could have open enrollment periods thus implying that there would be times that they did not have to take anyone The rules by defining the open enrollment periods as short times and even more important as specific dates for all companies remove the possibility that some carrier would always be in a required open enrollment period even if others were not In a much more effective manner than any mandate this rule will keep many people from taking the risk of having no health insurance At least there is actual risk now that it appears buying coverage on the way to the hospital will not be an effective strategy at the same time This will be the only time that exchanges will accept new applications for insurance or applications to change insurance unless special circumstances are present such as loss of other coverage marriage birth This is consistent with the statute which allows carriers to restrict to open enrollment periods The proposed rules also offer a glimpse into what the exchanges may really look like An application may be submitted through the internet so a web presence will be required Many view exchanges to be almost totally electronic and the current Utah exchange operates in this manner However the proposed rules also require an exchange to accept phone applications and in person applications Sounds like an office and more than just a small crew will be required

    Original URL path: http://selfemployed.nase.org/business-help/get-help/health/health-blog/self-made/2011/07/18/A_Primer_On_Health_Insurance_Exchanges (2016-02-14)
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  • Login
    Media Contact Legislative Action Center Business Help Ask the Experts Taxes Business Strategy Business Law Marketing 101 Finance Accounting Health Care Reform Marketing Advertising Real Estate Information Technology NASE Minute Get Help Tax Healthcare Reform Health Marketing 101 Business Management Marketing Advertising Real Estate Calculators Business Breakeven Analysis Calculator Cash Flow Calculator Equipment Buy vs Lease Investment Annual Rate of Return Calculator Mortgage Mortgage Loan Calculator Retirement Savings and Planning 401 k Calculator How long will my retirement savings last Tax 1040 Tax Calculator Payroll Deductions Calculator Self Employment Tax Calculator Helpful Links ASBDC Member Directory Search My NASE About Me Account Benefits Optional Benefits Payment Details Expert Questions Email Subscriptions Membership Directory New NASE org Web Account Username Password Remember Me Account Assistance Forgot Username Forgot Password Already a NASE Member but don t have a NASE org Web Account New NASE org Web Account Personal Information First Name First Name Required Last Name Last Name Required Business Company Name Title Contact Information Address City State AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM

    Original URL path: https://selfemployed.nase.org/my-nase/login (2016-02-14)
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  • How To Protect Your Employees’ Health And Privacy Rights
    individual is one who can perform a job s essential functions with or without reasonable accommodation At the federal level the law applies if you have 15 or more employees But your state may have stiffer rules In Massachusetts for example businesses with six or more employees must comply with ADA For details contact your state department of labor or one of the 10 government sponsored regional Disability and Business Technical Assistance Centers www adata org 800 949 4232 Reasonable accommodations could include making your worksite accessible to someone who has a disability restructuring a job and buying or modifying equipment needed to perform the work Note that reasonable accommodation does not force an employer to reduce her standards or to make changes that would impose undue hardship on the business What about accommodating customers Unless your company is a private club or religious entity ADA obligates all public businesses to offer customers access to goods and services although the government says the provisions do not require any action causing undue financial burden As an example even though your business is off limits to dogs you must allow access to customers or employees who use service animals Admittedly key ADA phrases such as undue financial burden and reasonable accommodation are fuzzy and open to wide interpretation When questions come up take advantage of these resources Free consultation from your regional Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center www adata org The U S Equal Employment Opportunity Commission www eeoc gov 800 669 4000 TTY 800 669 6820 Free consultation and technical assistance from the Job Accommodation Network www jan wvu edu 800 526 7234 TTY 877 781 9403 Small businesses may qualify for tax credits and deductions that can help offset the cost of accommodations building modifications and barrier removal Ask your tax professional or visit the IRS Web site at www irs gov HIPAA Regulations Passed in 1996 the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA has two aspects Title I has to do with protecting workers health coverage when they change jobs Title II governs among other things the security and privacy of health information Title I obligates all employers who offer a health plan to provide a certificate of creditable coverage when an employee changes jobs or buys individual health insurance When you hire someone ask about his or her certificate if your company s health plan has exclusions for pre existing conditions The certificate assures that credit for such conditions carries over from one health plan to the next As part of Title II HIPAA s privacy rule sets the conditions under which a health plan can share individually identifiable health information with an employer or plan sponsor If you sponsor a group health plan for employees the plan is a covered entity subject to HIPAA regulations The only exception is self insured and self administered plans with fewer than 50 people participating These small plans are not subject to the privacy rule Even when a group

    Original URL path: http://selfemployed.nase.org/business-help/get-help/health/health-news/2011/11/04/How_To_Protect_Your_Employees_Health_And_Privacy_Rights (2016-02-14)
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  • How Much Is Clutter Costing You?
    all NASE news How Much Is Clutter Costing You Thursday March 17 2011 Your workspace is more than just a place It s a symbol of your mental health Imagine you walk into another professional s messy office You may think she seems overworked stressed and even a little out of control You probably feel distracted because there s so much to look at and uncomfortable because all that stuff is oppressive Back in your own office clutter works in the same way You just don t notice because you ve grown accustomed to the mess You work around it physically and mentally Meanwhile the mess is sending you a subliminal message that you re the one who s overworked stressed and out of control Health Costs Clutter is one of the leading causes of stress in the workplace In a survey of office workers in the U S and Europe funded by the Esselte Corporation 43 percent of Americans admitted that they felt overwhelmed by their own disorganization Stress can cause a whole spectrum of health problems including heart disease sleep deprivation obesity and clinical depression Stressed out bodies produce high levels of cortisol the stress hormone and adrenaline When your body makes too much of these substances its regular processes go haywire Your blood pressure rises your immune system weakens and your mental acuity plummets A messy office can actually cause you bodily harm Piles of stuff invite dust to accumulate which is especially hard on people with allergies and asthma Other Costs Office clutter can also cost you time money and your good reputation Consider these sobering statistics The National Association of Professional Organizers estimates that Americans waste almost an hour each day looking for misplaced items The Delphi Group a team of strategic advisors in Boston

    Original URL path: http://selfemployed.nase.org/business-help/get-help/health/health-news/2011/03/17/How_Much_Is_Clutter_Costing_You (2016-02-14)
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