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  • Nature - john-may
    to speak up for nature John May Retired farmer county judge and avid boater Crittenden County Kentucky A 2 500 acre hardwood forest in Kentucky part of the Big Rivers Corridor was protected with money from the federal Forest Legacy program which is now at risk Founded in 1990 the program has saved more than 2 million acres from development More Generations Coming I ve lived in Kentucky all my life notes John May who grew up along the Ohio River in Crittenden County My ancestors came here in 1795 and we have a long history of river lore With more than 200 years of family history on the land John knows the stories of the river even the ones from before he was born They are handed down through the family like how the 1936 summer was so dry there was no corn on the stalks and how the 1937 floods were so bad his father had to put their cows in the barn loft to keep them from drowning The connection between past present and future gives John a long perspective and shapes his values on conservation and development In this area we need development We need industry We need jobs for people But we also need to take care of what we ve got We need conservation I think they can go hand in hand If you abuse the land it s not going to be here for the next generation Sign the Pledge I know that investing in conservation is the only way we can help keep America beautiful strong prosperous and healthy I am proud to join a community of people who speak up for nature to help save the places we love I pledge to use my Outside Voice false false 1 Real People

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/john-may.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Nature - yousuf-netaji
    netaji Take a hike with your friends or family show them what inspires you Yousuf Nejati Restoration enthusiast Boyds Maryland Yousuf Nejati has spent most of his life on farms Growing up in Cleveland Tennessee he fondly remembers running around his grandparents farm playing in the woods chasing rabbits and splashing in streams Today he is embarking on a new career in conservation after interning and working at The Nature Conservancy in Maryland While at The Nature Conservancy Nejati has worked on the prescribed fire crew restoration crew and stewardship crew on the Eastern Shore Outdoor recreation and nature is a huge part of my life I grew up on farms and spend as much time as I can rock climbing hiking kayaking and biking anything that gets me outside You learn so much being out in the woods that you wouldn t learn being in the city says Nejati Nejati plans to continue to be an active voice for the conservation community by inspiring others and organizing and leading volunteer events and field trips I use my outside voice to share my experiences and knowledge of the natural world with the rest of the world So take a hike with your friends or family show them what inspires you Help open their eyes to what you see From inspiration comes passion Sign the Pledge I know that investing in conservation is the only way we can help keep America beautiful strong prosperous and healthy I am proud to join a community of people who speak up for nature to help save the places we love I pledge to use my Outside Voice false false 1 Real People Real Stories Why You Should Speak Up Everyone should use their voices their bodies their minds to take action on behalf of

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/yousuf-netaji.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Nature - songyi-ee
    York She grew up making excursions to the beach city parks state parks mountains and rivers because it reminded my parents of growing up in the countryside in South Korea I grew up with a small patch of grass behind my house lucky to call it a backyard said Ee I spent hours in my backyard playing in the dirt watering plants planting seeds These are some of my greatest moments of sheer jubilance and serenity in my memory Ee entered into the High School for Environmental Studies in New York City and discovered a realm of people who shared similar interests and she continued to look for more opportunities to get involved in environmental efforts In 2008 she joined The Nature Conservancy s Leaders in Environmental Action for the Future LEAF program a paid summer internship program for high school students and worked at the Mashomack Preserve on Long Island I fell deeply in love with nature I was obsessed All I could think about was how to get myself more involved with the cause Ee is now working as an intern for The Nature Conservancy s efforts to broaden conservation efforts in urban environments Ee says My number one priority is to raise awareness to educate people and contribute to a greater effort to restore and protect nature I want to stay on nature s good side by working to reverse the negative impacts we imparted as a society Sometimes conservation awareness can be raised simply by speaking up Sign the Pledge I know that investing in conservation is the only way we can help keep America beautiful strong prosperous and healthy I am proud to join a community of people who speak up for nature to help save the places we love I pledge to use my

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/songyi-ee.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Nature - wildfire-disaster-funding-act
    of the FY1991USFS budget increasing to over 40 percent in recent years USFS and DOI have been forced to borrow money to cover fire suppression shortfalls eight times since 2000 In just the last two years more than 1 billion were transferred from USFS and DOI forest programs to cover fire suppression shortfalls These budget shortfalls and the practice of transferring are crippling the ability of agencies to manage forests effectively for people water and wildlife including projects that help reduce megafire risk and future wildfire suppression costs The Wildfire Disaster Funding Act will resolve this inefficiency and reduce the devastating impacts that transfers have had on people water and wildlife What the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act Will Do For the first time the bipartisan Wildfire Disaster Funding Act WDFA S 1875 and H R 3992 would develop a wildfire emergency funding process for the USFS and DOI that would be similar to those used for other natural disaster emergencies Currently no other entities within the federal system are forced to fund disaster response within their discretionary budgets Under WDFA USFS and DOI wildfire suppression would be funded through a budget cap adjustment similar to that currently used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA for other natural disasters under the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 The regular appropriations process would continue to fund 70 percent of the ten year average for suppression WDFA would require the USFS and DOI to make two wildfire suppression requests for every fiscal year Under the normal annual budget process 70 percent of the 10 year average for predictable wildfire suppression and Through a budget cap adjustment a level of request for extraordinary wildfire suppression beyond the annual budget request not to exceed 2 689 billion WDFA s approach would

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/wildfire-disaster-funding-act.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Nature - LWCF
    Gains Sustained investment in LWCF will stimulate our nation s economy create jobs and shore up our infrastructure LWCF makes a substantial contribution to these critical priorities by strategically securing the economic asset that our federal state and local public lands represent Hunting fishing camping and other outdoor recreation activities contribute a total of 725 5 billion annually to the economy supporting 6 15 million jobs one of every 20 jobs in the United States and stimulating 8 percent of all consumer spending The ripple effect of outdoor recreation activities is even greater with an estimated economic impact of 1 2 trillion and an estimated employment impact of 12 million jobs annually More broadly outdoor recreation nature conservation and historical preservation contribute a total of 1 06 trillion annually to the economy supporting 8 4 million jobs or 1 of every 16 jobs in the United States 1 These jobs are home grown and non exportable Property values of homes near parks and protected areas are repeatedly more than 20 percent higher than similar properties elsewhere Visitor driven business stimulates the economy in local communities surrounding national parks and other public lands Protecting water through watershed forest and wetland conservation is the most cost effective way to ensure clean and adequate water supplies The services provided by natural systems such as flood mitigation water purification carbon sequestration etc in the 48 contiguous United States have a value amounting to 1 6 trillion annually which is greater than 10 percent of U S GDP Overview of the Fund The Land and Water Conservation Fund s goal is to balance the use of one natural resource oil and gas with the conservation of another by using a portion of drilling fees to protect important land and water resources But despite an increase in energy production funding for land and water protection has been low and unpredictable The program is authorized to receive a small percentage of offshore oil and gas fee revenues up to 900 million per year but most of these funds have been diverted elsewhere With America losing one million acres of working lands including ranches farms and forests to development each year it is critical that we fix funding for the LWCF for the next generation of conservation Every State Depends on the Land and Water Conservation Fund From the Grand Canyon National Park to the Appalachian National Scenic Trail the Land and Water Conservation Fund has helped protect some of America s most treasured places conserving national parks and public recreation areas lands by rivers working forests farms and ranches fish and wildlife refuges trails and state and local parks The Nature Conservancy supports full funding and reauthorization of LWCF to fix the program and guarantee oil and gas proceeds are reinvested annually to a true LWCF trust fund Americans Strongly Support Protecting Our Land and Water More than 85 percent of Americans support funding the Land and Water Conservation Fund at its authorized level of 900 million

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/lwcf.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Nature - cflrp
    No 2 ranking Nov 1 2011 Blue Mountain Eagle Oregon Partners Plea Case for Malheur Forest Funding Nov 1 2011 Oregon Public Broadcasting Arizona Four Forest Restoration Initiative The Four Forest Restoration Initiative 4FRI is a collaborative effort to restore forest ecosystems on portions of the Coconino Kaibab Apache Sitgreaves and Tonto National Forests in northern Arizona Our vision is to restore natural fire regimes functioning populations of native plants and animals and reduce the threat of destructive wildfire to thriving forest communities in partnership with sustainable forest industries that strengthen local economies California Dinkey Landscape Restoration Project The Dinkey Landscape Restoration Project covers 154 000 acres in California s southern Sierra Nevada Mountains Controlled burns thinning and watershed restoration will reduce the potential of mega fire threat to more than 5 000 homes improve conditions for sensitive species such as the Pacific fisher and California spotted owl and add jobs to an area with high unemployment Colorado Front Range Landscape Restoration Initiative Colorado s Front Range contains 1 5 million acres of ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests in urgent need of restoration to protect communities and ecosystems from destructive fires The Front Range CFLRP is decreasing fire risk while also creating job opportunities protecting drinking water supply and sustaining critical habitat Colorado Restoring Colorado s Uncompahgre Plateau Over 40 of Colorado s 555 300 acre Uncompahgre plateau is located in the willdand urban interface and fuel reduction work is a community safety priority At the same time restoration treatments will improve wildlife habitat and conditions for native Colorado cutthroat and provide crucial employment opportunities for the last remaining large sawmills in Colorado Florida Accelerating Longleaf Pine Restoration The 567 800 acres in Florida s Osceola National Forest and adjoining lands within the Accelerating Longleaf Pine Restoration CFLRP have substantial timber resources and a history of dangerous mega fires CFLRP activities that reduce fire risk will also support job opportunities bio energy development wildlife habitat and the health of natural water systems Idaho Selway Middle Fork Clearwater The Clearwater Basin Collaborative offers a path away from the timber wars towards a more constructive future by meeting the needs of local communities conservationists timber industry sportsmen and the Nez Perce Tribe CFLRP funds enable the Clearwater Basin Collaborative and U S Forest Service to take a strong step in creating local jobs and restoring healthy forests Montana Southwestern Crown of the Continent The Southwestern Crown of the Continent Collaborative Project is pioneering new forest restoration efforts across 1 5 million acres in Northwest Montana The Project is uniting the goals of forest health and forest jobs that will restore clean water improve wildlife habitat for elk and grizzly bears and create economic opportunities for an existing skilled workforce New Mexico Southwest Jemez The Southwest Jemez Mountains have a history of devastating fires over the 210 000 acres in the Jemez River watershed in north central New Mexico Southwest Jemez CFLRP activities will reduce mega fire risk while providing local jobs

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/cflrp.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Nature - farm-bill
    enable growers to do what they want to do be good stewards of the land These tools support clean air and water productive soils enhanced wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation opportunities increased flood control stronger local communities and rural economies and of course affordable and healthy food Read more below about the policy priorities we asked Congress to include most of which are in the bill that is now law You can also see recent comments from our President and CEO Mark R Tercek in his statement after the bill passed and in an opinion column he wrote with the National Corn Growers Association Farm Bill Top Three Priorities 1 Conserve and Restore Key Habitats Improve the conservation of wetlands grasslands and private forests by maintaining funding for easements with a special emphasis placed on permanent easements and the Wetlands Reserve Program WRP Grasslands Reserve Program GRP and Farm and Ranchland Protection Program FRPP Easement Programs are critical to the conservation of wetlands grasslands floodplains and private forests 2 Improve Environmental Management Enhance the management of private lands through Working Lands Programs which work by improving stewardship practices and providing technical assistance and cost share programs on working agricultural and private non industrial forest lands 3 Target Key Resource Issues Direct a higher percentage of Farm Bill funding to address resource issues of special significance in priority landscapes and watersheds and structure programs to achieve local and landscape scale environmental benefits Such focused investments of Farm Bill resources will result in greater conservation outcomes increased economic benefits and better returns for American taxpayers Additional Important Issues Discourage Conversion of Grazing Lands to Marginal Cropland A strong Sodsaver program will prevent the conversion of native grasslands to row crops Strengthen Conservation Compliance Linking conservation compliance with crop insurance as it was

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/farm-bill.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Nature - restore-act
    let them know that you support the RESTORE Act and urge them to pass the bill quickly Two official reports on the spill one conducted by Navy Secretary and former Mississippi Governor Ray Mabus the other from the bipartisan National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling recommended that CWA penalties be dedicated to Gulf Coast restoration The RESTORE Act creates an essential framework to manage and finance the Gulf Coast recovery Using 80 percent of the CWA penalties from the Gulf oil disaster the RESTORE Act establishes a trust account to restore both the economic and environmental health of the Gulf Coast A majority portion of these penalties 60 percent will be allocated to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council to be spent in two ways Half of the funds will be used to implement the Council s comprehensive federal environmental plan The other half will be distributed to the five Gulf States based on oil spill impacts and spent according to each individual state s plan which will be consistent with the comprehensive federal plan A smaller portion 35 percent will be available to Gulf Coast states to be used within the impacted region for environmental and economic restoration The remainder 5 percent will be dedicated to science and monitoring of Gulf Coast ecosystem restoration and fisheries Fifty percent of the accrued interest on the Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund funds the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Science Monitoring and Technology Program and Fisheries Endowment The RESTORE Act NOW IS THE TIME The Gulf Region is an Essential Part of the Nation s Economy Recovery of the Gulf Coast is a national economic imperative Many of the nation s key economic resources and the underpinnings of economic production in states far beyond the Gulf Coast depend upon the Gulf s fragile and threatened ecosystems Restoring the Gulf will make the region more resilient lessen the potential damage from future hurricanes and flooding and create tens of thousands of jobs A healthy ecosystem means a healthy economy both regionally and nationally Gulf energy helps power America Roughly a third of all domestic oil comes from the Gulf Ports and other infrastructure supported by the environment are essential to keeping that industry functioning Shipping and exports from across the country rely on a healthy Gulf The Gulf region is home to 10 of our nation s 15 largest ports by tonnage The nation s seafood industry relies on healthy habitats in the Gulf The Gulf produces roughly 40 percent of all commercial seafood in the lower 48 states Tourism depends on the natural wonders of the Gulf Restaurant hotel and other hospitality workers are part of the Gulf s 34 billion per year tourism industry Action by Congress Has Voter Support Nationwide A recent national survey showed that 83 percent of likely voters support a proposal to designate fines paid by the parties responsible for the Gulf oil disaster toward restoration of the Gulf Coast and the Mississippi

    Original URL path: http://voice.nature.org/sitepages/restore-act.aspx (2016-02-01)
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