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  • 01
    database Security Community Blogs Mailing lists List archives Developers Browse source Cross reference Release engineering Projects list Ports History Emulators Packages Browse packages Release engineering Wiki Home Edit Comment Source History New RecentChanges NetBSD Wiki archives 2013 01 Jan 2013 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/01/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 02
    Query bug database Security Community Blogs Mailing lists List archives Developers Browse source Cross reference Release engineering Projects list Ports History Emulators Packages Browse packages Release engineering Wiki Home Edit Comment Source History New RecentChanges NetBSD Wiki archives 2013 02 Feb 2013 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/02/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 03
    The second release candidate of NetBSD 6 1 is now available for download at http ftp NetBSD org pub NetBSD NetBSD 6 1 RC2 NetBSD 6 1 will be the first feature update for the NetBSD 6 branch There are many new drivers some new features and many bug fixes Fixes since RC1 include Various terminfo fixes PR 46793 PR 47090 PR 47490 PR 47532 Fixed a segfault in awk 1 PR 47553 Moved boottime50 and its associated sysctl into the compat module PR 47579 Updated tzdata to 2013b with the latest timezone info Fixed a crash when the security curtain sysctl is enabled PR 47598 Fixed some IPF locking issues Fix a crash on statically linked programs for NetBSD alpha A complete list of changes can be found at http ftp NetBSD org pub NetBSD NetBSD 6 1 RC2 CHANGES 6 1 Please help us test this and any upcoming release candidates as much as possible Remember any feedback is good feedback We d love to hear from you whether you ve got a complaint or a compliment Posted Monday evening March 18th 2013 Tags blog Matthew Sporleder NetBSD Blog pointers to rpi docs 2013Q1 We get a lot

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/03/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 04
    thread creation In this case the Linux kernel is the host In principle there are three steps in getting a rump kernel to run in a given environment In reality I prefer a more iterative approach but the development can be divided into three steps all the same implement generic rump kernel hypercalls such as memory allocation thread creation and synchronization figure out how to compile and run the rump kernel plus hypervisor in the target environment implement I O related hypercalls for whatever I O you plan to do Getting basic functionality up and running was a relatively straightforward process The only issue that required some thinking was an application binary interface ABI mismatch I was testing on x86 where Linux kernel ABI uses mregparm 3 which means that function arguments are passed in registers where possible NetBSD always passes arguments on the stack When two ABIs collide the code may run but since function arguments passed between the two ABIs result in garbage eventually an error will be hit perhaps in the form of accessing invalid memory The C code was easy enough to fix by applying the appropriate compiler flags In addition to C code a rump kernel uses a handful of assembly routines from NetBSD mostly pertaining to optimizations e g ffs but also to access the atomic memory operations of the platform After assembly routines had been handled it was possible to load a Linux kernel module which bootstraps a rump kernel in the Linux kernel and does some file system operations on the fictional kernfs file system A screenshot of the resulting dmesg output is shown below It is one thing to execute a computation and an entirely different thing to perform I O To test I O capabilities I ran a rump kernel providing a TCP IP driver inside the Linux kernel For a networking stack to be able to do anything sensible the interface layer needs to be able to shuffle packets The quickest way to implement the hypercalls for packet shuffling was to use the same method as a userspace virtual TCP IP stack might use read write packets using the tap device Some might say that doing this from inside the kernel is cheating but given that the alternative was to copypaste the tuntap driver and edit it slightly I call my approach constructive laziness The demo itself opens a TCP socket to port 80 on vger kernel org IP address 0x43b484d1 if you want to be really precise does a HTTP get for and displays the last 500 bytes of the result TCP IP is handled by the rump kernel not by the Linux kernel Think of it as the Linux kernel having two alternative TCP IP stacks Again a screenshot of the resulting dmesg is shown below Note that unlike in the first screenshot there is no printout for the root file system because the configuration used here does not include any file system support Yes you can

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/04/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 05
    be found at http ftp NetBSD org pub NetBSD NetBSD 6 1 RC4 CHANGES 6 1 Please help us test this and any upcoming release candidates as much as possible Remember any feedback is good feedback We d love to hear from you whether you ve got a complaint or a compliment Posted late Thursday afternoon May 2nd 2013 Tags blog Jeff Rizzo NetBSD Blog NetBSD 6 1 and 6 0 2 Released The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 6 1 the first feature update of the NetBSD 6 release branch It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons as well as new features and enhancements Simultaneously the NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 6 0 2 the second security bugfix update of the NetBSD 6 0 release branch It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons without new features For more details please see the 6 1 release notes and the 6 0 2 release notes Complete source and binaries for NetBSD 6 1 and 6 0 2 are available for download at many sites around the world A list of download sites providing FTP AnonCVS SUP and other services may be found at http www NetBSD org mirrors Posted late Saturday evening May 18th 2013 Tags blog Matthew Sporleder NetBSD Blog beaglebone docs pointer needs improvement NetBSD works on the BeagleBone and improvements continue to happen but we could use some help updating the docs If you are using the port or want to make sure you email www with some improvements to the BeagleBone wiki page Posted Saturday afternoon May 25th 2013 Tags blog martin NetBSD Blog Firefox on sparc64 I use a NetBSD sparc64 machine a dual sun blade 2500 silver as desktop Of course this sometimes requires me fixing some of the desktop software I use Luckily as a software developer my requirements are quite simple and most software I need editors gimp xsane just works One of the itching points used to be Firefox Late in the Firefox 4 0 release cycle some changes landed in the mozilla main tree that broke it for sparc64 and for a while no one knew how to fix it When lately I had the need to test a web app with all strange clients available I even booted my macppc into MacOS and tried the ancient safari version I noticed that my sparc64 firefox 3 6 28 was not usable for testing firefox did not have websocket support back then which the app I was testing needed I checked out the mozilla mercurial tree for the firefox alpha version applied all pkgsrc patches we lyhave plenty and modified the configuration to generate a debuggable version and after surprisingly little effort I had it building Of course it did not run So I started to debugging it which is not for the light hearted as you can imagine Thanks to some bank holiday

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/05/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 06
    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 jdf s Summer of Code project 28 29 30 Matthew Sporleder NetBSD Blog jdf s Summer of Code project Julian Djamil Fagir wrote a blog post about his GSoC project As one of five I ve been chosen for participating in Google Summer Of Code GSoC this year for NetBSD My project is to write a

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/06/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 07
    great work but in the end we chose Mingzhe Wang and Matthew Bauer These two grand price winners were given a trip to Mountain View to visit the Google headquarters and meet with other GCi price winners You can see the results on the corresponding wiki page There were 89 finished tasks ranging from research tasks document how other projects manage their documentation creating howtos trying out software on NetBSD writing code ATF tests and Markdown converters and more writing manpages and documentation fixing bugs and converting documentation from the website to the wiki Overall it was a nice experience for NetBSD On the one hand some real work was done for many of them integration is still pending On the other hand it was a stressful time for the NetBSD mentors supervising the students and helping them on their tasks Especially we had to learn many lessons you will find them on the wiki page for GCi 2012 but next time we will do much better We will try to apply again next year but we will need a large bunch of new possible tasks to be chosen again So if you think you have a task which doesn t require great prior knowledge and is solvable within two hours by an experienced developer but also by a 13 18 year old within finite time feel free to contact us with an outline or write it directly to the wiki page for Code In in the NetBSD wiki Posted Tuesday afternoon July 2nd 2013 Tags blog macallan NetBSD Blog SX support added Support for Sun s SX rendering engine found in the SparcStation 20 and 10SX s memory controllers has been added both for the console and X Both drivers support basic acceleration block copy rectangle fill character drawing in the kernel the Xorg driver also supports Xrender acceleration This probably makes SX the oldest supported hardware which can do that SX is more or less a vector processor built into a memory controller The or less part comes from the fact that it can t actually read instructions from memory the CPU has to feed them one by one This isn t quite as bad as it sounds SX has plenty of registers 128 eight of them have special functions the rest is free for all and every instruction takes a count to operate on several subsequent registers or memory locations ALU ops can use up to 16 memory accesses up to 32 SX supports some parallelism too the ALUs can do up to two 16bit multiplications and two other arithmetic or logical ops per clock cycle 32bit multiplications use both ALUs The thing runs at 50MHz not a whole lot by today s standards but it can be a significant help to any CPUs you can put into these machines The kernel part hs been committed a while ago see cgfourteen at obio always runs in 8bit colour with everything scrolling character drawing etc done by SX

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/07/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 08
    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 NetBSD 6 1 1 released 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 snj NetBSD Blog NetBSD 6 1 1 released The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 6 1 1 the first security bugfix update of the NetBSD 6 1 release branch It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2013/08/ (2016-02-01)
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