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  • 08
    web server reads the served pages from you need a TCP IP stack to communicate with the clients and you need a network interface driver to be able to send and receive packets Furthermore you need the often overlooked yet very surprisingly complicated system call handlers For example opening a socket is not really very complicated to handle Neither is reading and writing data However when you start piling things like fcntl O NONBLOCK and poll on top things get trickier By a rough estimate if you run an httpd on NetBSD approximately 100k lines of code from kernel are used just to service the requests that the httpd makes If you do the math and bc did there are 86400 seconds in a week The OS we are discussing is able to run an off the shelf httpd but definitely I did not write 1 line of code per second 24 7 during the past week Smoke and Mirrors CGI Edition The key to happiness is not to write 100k lines of code from scratch nor to port it from another OS as both are time consuming and error prone techniques and error proneness leads to even more consumption of time Rump kernels come into the picture as the key to happiness and provide the necessary drivers As the old saying goes rump kernels do not an OS make and we need the rest of the bits that make up the OS side of the software stack from somewhere These bits need to make it seem like the drivers in a rump kernel are running inside the NetBSD kernel hence smoke and mirrors What is surprising is how little code needs to exist between the drivers and the hardware just some hundreds of lines of code More specifically in the bare metal scenario we need support for low level machine dependent code thread support and a scheduler rump kernel hypercall layer additionally bundling the application into a bootable image The figure below illustrates the rump kernel software stack The arrows correspond to the above list in reverse order We go over the list starting from the top of the list bottom of the figure Low level machine dependent code is what the OS uses to get the CPU and devices to talking terms with the rest of OS Before we can do anything useful we need to bootstrap Bootstrapping x86 32 is less work than one would expect which incidentally is also why the OS runs only in 32bit mode adding 64bit support would not likely be many hours of work and patches are welcome Thanks to the Multiboot specification the bootstrap code is more or less just a question of setting the stack pointer and jumping to C code In C code we need to parse the amount of physical memory available and initialize the console Since NetBSD device drivers mainly use interrupts we also need interrupt support for the drivers to function correctly On x86 interrupt support

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2014/08/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 09
    interested users in Sofia on Friday September 26 2014 Bernd Ernesti veego took this photo In the back row from left to right Masao Uebayashi uebayasi Thomas Klausner wiz Yann Sionneau Marc Balmer mbalmer Justin Cormack justin Jaap Boender jaapb Adrian Steinmann ast Martin Husemann martin Taylor R Campbell riastradh Michael van Elst mlelstv Sevan Janiyan Alexander Nasonov alnsn In the front row from left to right Julian Coleman jdc Joerg Sonnenberger joerg Valeriy E Ushakov uwe Christoph Badura bad S P Zeidler spz Pierre Pronchery khorben Stephen Borrill sborrill Some Developers made it to the conference only after the summit so Emmanuel Dreyfus manu Luke Mewburn lukem and Lourival Neto lneto are unfortunately missing on that picture Marc Balmer presented some slides prepared by Masanobu SAITOH about ongoing work at IIJ Marc also proposed some extensions to the in tree httpd aka bozohttpd to allow creation of simple dynamic content via Lua templates The question whether it would be possible to serve www netbsd org by bozohttpd was discussed and only administrative reasons seem to prevent it which was overall considered good enough Pierre Pronchery presented his work on EdgeBSD and why he does not consider it a fork

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2014/09/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 10
    History Emulators Packages Browse packages Release engineering Wiki Home Edit Comment Source History New RecentChanges NetBSD Wiki archives 2014 10 Oct 2014 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NetBSD 6 1 5 and 6 0 6 released 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 snj NetBSD Blog NetBSD 6 1 5 and 6 0 6 released The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 6 1 5 the fifth security bugfix update of the NetBSD 6 1 release branch and NetBSD 6 0 6 the sixth security bugfix update of the NetBSD 6 0 release branch They represent a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons and if you are running a prior release of either branch we strongly suggest that you update to one of these releases For more details please see the NetBSD 6 1 5 release notes or NetBSD 6 0 6 release notes Complete source and binaries for NetBSD are available for download at many sites around the world A list of download sites providing FTP AnonCVS

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2014/10/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 11
    for mine Image by myself under creative commons license This machine is used to run regular tests for big endian arm the results are gathered here Running it big endian is just a way to trigger more bugs The last test run logged on the page is already done with an SMP kernel No regressions were found so far and the other bugs sligtly more than 30 failures in the test run is way too much will be addressed one by one Now happy multi ARM ing everyone and I am looking forward to a great NetBSD 7 0 release Posted at lunch time on Thursday November 6th 2014 Tags blog snj NetBSD Blog NetBSD 5 1 5 and 5 2 3 available for download The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 5 1 5 the fifth security bugfix update of the NetBSD 5 1 release branch and NetBSD 5 2 3 the third security bugfix update of the NetBSD 5 2 release branch They represent a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons and if you are running a prior release of either branch we strongly suggest that you update to one of these releases For more details please see the NetBSD 5 1 5 release notes or NetBSD 5 2 3 release notes Complete source and binaries for NetBSD are available for download at many sites around the world A list of download sites providing FTP AnonCVS SUP and other services may be found at http www NetBSD org mirrors Posted Friday evening November 21st 2014 Tags blog macallan NetBSD Blog So they sent me a CI20 When I found out that Ingenic is giving away some of their MIPS Creator CI20 boards I applied and to my surprise they sent me one Of course the point was to make NetBSD work on it I just finished the first step That is make it load a kernel identify setup the CPU attach a serial console This is what it looks like U Boot SPL 2013 10 rc3 g9329ab16a204 Jun 26 2014 09 43 22 SDRAM H5TQ2G83CFR initialization done U Boot 2013 10 rc3 g9329ab16a204 Jun 26 2014 09 43 22 Board ci20 Ingenic XBurst JZ4780 SoC DRAM 1 GiB NAND 8192 MiB MMC jz mmc msc1 0 In eserial3 Out eserial3 Err eserial3 Net dm9000 ci20 dhcp ERROR resetting DM9000 not responding dm9000 i o 0xb6000000 id 0x90000a46 DM9000 running in 8 bit mode MAC d0 31 10 ff 7e 89 operating at 100M full duplex mode BOOTP broadcast 1 DHCP client bound to address 192 168 0 47 Warning no boot file name using C0A8002F img Using dm9000 device TFTP from server 192 168 0 44 our IP address is 192 168 0 47 Filename C0A8002F img Load address 0x88000000 Loading 284 2 KiB s done Bytes transferred 1146945 118041 hex ci20 bootm Booting kernel from Legacy Image at 88000000 Image Name evbmips 7 99 1 CI20 Image Type MIPS NetBSD Kernel

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2014/11/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 12
    database Security Community Blogs Mailing lists List archives Developers Browse source Cross reference Release engineering Projects list Ports History Emulators Packages Browse packages Release engineering Wiki Home Edit Comment Source History New RecentChanges NetBSD Wiki archives 2014 12 Dec 2014 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2014/12/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 01
    any kind of acceleration yet The console runs in 8 bit X will support 24 bit Sun BW2 has kernel support should work with the wsfb driver in X The board doesn t support a hardware cursor or any kind of acceleration Hardware is monochrome only Weitek P9100 found in Tadpole SPARCbook 3 series laptops supported with acceleration in both the kernel and X with the pnozz driver Hardware cursor is supported The console runs in 8 bit X can run in 8 16 or 24 bit colour Sun S24 TCX supported with acceleration in both the kernel and X with the suntcx driver A hardware cursor is supported only on S24 the 8bit TCX s DAC doesn t support it The console runs in 8 bit X in 8 or 24 bit Sun CG14 supported with acceleration using the new sx driver and hardware cursor in both the kernel and X The console runs in 8 bit X in 24 bit The X driver supports some xrender acceleration as well Fujitsu AG 10e supported with acceleration in both the kernel and X a hardware cursor is supported The console runs in 8 bit X in 24 bit IGS 1682 found in JavaStation 10 Krups supported but the chip lacks any acceleration features It does support a hardware cursor though which the wsfb driver can use Currently X is limited to 8 bit colour alhough the hardware supports up to 24bit Sun CG12 Matrox SG3 supported without acceleration in both the kernel and X The console runs in monochrome or 8 bit X in 24 bit Southland Media Systems now Quantum 3D MGX supported with acceleration as console X is currently limited to wsfb in 8 bit No hardware cursor support in the driver yet All boards with dedicated drivers will work as primary or secondary heads in X boards which use wsfb will only work in X when they are the system console For example you can run an SS20 with a cg14 as console an AG 10e and two CG6 with four heads There is also a generic kernel driver genfb at sbus which may or may not work with graphics hardware not listed here depending on the board s firmware If it provides standard properties for width height colour depth stride and framebuffer address it should work but not all boards do this For example the ZX doesn t give a framebuffer address and there is no reason to assume it s the only one Also there is no standard way to program palette registers via firmware so even if genfb works colours are likely off X should work with the wsfb driver it will likely look a bit odd though Boards like the CG8 have older pre wscons kernel support and weren t converted due to lack of hardware They seem to be pretty rare though in all the years I ve been using NetBSD sparc I have not seen a single user ask about them

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2015/01/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 02
    zero unexpected failures on multiple architectures For quite some time now regular test results have been hovering in the 20 30 failures range with some variance due to race conditions not always hitting In the last few weeks the numbers have constantly improved and on both the netbsd 7 branch heading hopefully soon to the release of NetBSD 7 0 and current are down to zero unexpected failures for various architectures again This is due to many people spending significant amounts of time fixing bugs submitting problem reports improving tests and not unimportant in the cases at hand improving the in tree toolchain We collect the results of various regular test runs on the releng test results page but this gives no good overview of the failures found by the different runs I proposed a GSoC project to help with this the idea is to collect all test results in a database and have nice query and statistics pages If you are a student and interested in this please check the project description For the time being here is an overview of the top performers 10 failures on this week s tests against current Architecture Failures Tests page alpha 0

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2015/02/ (2016-02-01)
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  • 03
    create machine arch returned 17 timecounter Timecounters tick every 10 000 msec mainbus0 root cpu0 at mainbus0 core 0 600 MHz Cortex A7 r0p5 Cortex V7A core cpu0 DC enabled IC enabled WB disabled EABT branch prediction enabled cpu0 isar 0 0x2101110 1 0x13112111 2 0x21232041 3 0x11112131 4 0x10011142 5 0 cpu0 mmfr 0 0x10101105 1 0x40000000 2 0x1240000 3 0x2102211 cpu0 pfr 0 0x1131 1 0x11011 cpu0 32KB 32B 2 way L1 VIPT Instruction cache cpu0 32KB 64B 4 way write back locking C L1 PIPT Data cache cpu0 512KB 64B 8 way write through L2 PIPT Unified cache vfp0 at cpu0 NEON MPE VFP 3 0 rounding NaN propagation denormals vfp0 mvfr 0 0x10110222 1 0x11111111 cpu1 at mainbus0 core 1 disabled unresponsive cpu2 at mainbus0 core 2 disabled unresponsive cpu3 at mainbus0 core 3 disabled unresponsive obio0 at mainbus0 bcmicu0 at obio0 armgtmr0 at obio0 ARMv7 Generic 64 bit Timer 19200 kHz armgtmr0 interrupting on irq 99 timecounter Timecounter armgtmr0 frequency 19200000 Hz quality 500 bcmmbox0 at obio0 intr 65 VC mailbox vcmbox0 at bcmmbox0 vchiq0 at obio0 intr 66 BCM2835 VCHIQ bcmpm0 at obio0 Power management Reset and Watchdog controller bcmdmac0 at obio0 DMA0 DMA2 DMA4 DMA5 DMA8 DMA9 DMA10 bcmrng0 at obio0 RNG plcom0 at obio0 intr 57 plcom0 txfifo disabled plcom0 console genfb0 at obio0 switching to framebuffer console genfb0 framebuffer at 0x3d6fa000 size 1280x1024 depth 32 stride 5120 wsdisplay0 at genfb0 kbdmux 1 console default vt100 emulation wsmux1 connecting to wsdisplay0 wsdisplay0 screen 1 3 added default vt100 emulation sdhc0 at obio0 intr 62 SDHC controller sdhc0 interrupting on intr 62 dwctwo0 at obio0 intr 9 USB controller bcmspi0 at obio0 intr 54 SPI spi0 at bcmspi0 SPI bus bsciic0 at obio0 intr 53 BSC0 iic0 at bsciic0 I2C bus bsciic1 at obio0 intr 53 BSC1 iic1 at bsciic1 I2C bus bcmgpio0 at obio0 GPIO 0 31 gpio0 at bcmgpio0 32 pins bcmgpio1 at obio0 GPIO 32 53 gpio1 at bcmgpio1 22 pins usb0 at dwctwo0 USB revision 2 0 timecounter Timecounter clockinterrupt frequency 100 Hz quality 0 sdhc0 SD Host Specification 3 0 rev 153 sdhc0 using DMA transfer sdmmc0 at sdhc0 slot 0 uhub0 at usb0 vendor 0000 DWC2 root hub class 9 0 rev 2 00 1 00 addr 1 uhub0 1 port with 1 removable self powered ld0 at sdmmc0 0x03 0x5344 SL08G 0x80 0x0bcb2d39 0x08a ld0 7580 MB 3850 cyl 64 head 63 sec 512 bytes sect x 15523840 sectors ld0 4 bit width bus clock 50 000 MHz uhub1 at uhub0 port 1 vendor 0424 product 9514 class 9 0 rev 2 00 2 00 addr 2 uhub1 multiple transaction translators uhub1 5 ports with 4 removable self powered usmsc0 at uhub1 port 1 usmsc0 vendor 0424 product ec00 rev 2 00 2 00 addr 3 usmsc0 Ethernet address b8 27 eb 13 82 0f ukphy0 at usmsc0 phy 1 OUI 0x00800f model 0x000c rev 3 ukphy0 10baseT 10baseT FDX 100baseTX 100baseTX FDX auto boot device ld0 root on ld0a dumps on ld0b mountroot trying nfs mountroot trying msdos mountroot trying ext2fs mountroot trying ffs root file system type ffs kern module path stand evbarm 7 99 5 modules vchiq local ver 6 min 3 remote ver 6 vcaudio0 at vchiq0 auds vchiq get state g state remote initialised 1 0 vchiq vchiq initialise videocore initialized after 1 retries WARNING no TOD clock present WARNING using filesystem time WARNING CHECK AND RESET THE DATE Posted at lunch time on Monday March 9th 2015 Tags blog jmcneill NetBSD Blog NetBSD ported to Hardkernel ODROID C1 The Hardkernel ODROID C1 is a quad core ARMv7 development board that features an Amlogic S805 SoC quad core Cortex A5 1 5GHz 1GB RAM and gigabit ethernet for 35 USD The ODROID C1 is the first Cortex A5 board supported by NetBSD Matt Thomas matt added initial Cortex A5 support to the tree and based on his work I added support for the Amlogic S805 SoC NetBSD current and soon 7 0 includes support for this board with the ODROID C1 kernel The following hardware is supported Cortex A5 multiprocessor CPU frequency scaling L2 cache controller Interrupt controller Cortex A5 global timer Cortex A5 watchdog UART console USB OTG controller Gigabit ethernet SD card slot Hardware random number generator More information on the NetBSD evbarm on Hardkernel ODROID C1 wiki page Copyright c 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 The NetBSD Foundation Inc All rights reserved Copyright c 1982 1986 1989 1991 1993 The Regents of the University of California All rights reserved NetBSD 7 99 5 ODROID C1 350 Wed Mar 18 19 45 17 ADT 2015 Jared Jared PC cygdrive d netbsd src sys arch evbarm compile obj ODROID C1 total memory 1024 MB avail memory 1008 MB sysctl createv sysctl create machine arch returned 17 mainbus0 root cpu0 at mainbus0 core 0 1512 MHz Cortex A5 r0p1 Cortex V7A core cpu0 DC enabled IC enabled WB disabled EABT branch prediction enabled cpu0 32KB 32B 2 way L1 VIPT Instruction cache cpu0 32KB 32B 4 way write back locking C L1 PIPT Data cache cpu0 512KB 32B 8 way write back L2 PIPT Unified cache vfp0 at cpu0 NEON MPE VFP 3 0 rounding NaN propagation denormals cpu1 at mainbus0 core 1 cpu2 at mainbus0 core 2 cpu3 at mainbus0 core 3 armperiph0 at mainbus0 armgic0 at armperiph0 Generic Interrupt Controller 256 sources 245 valid armgic0 32 Priorities 224 SPIs 5 PPIs 16 SGIs a9tmr0 at armperiph0 A5 Global 64 bit Timer 378 MHz a9tmr0 interrupting on irq 27 a9wdt0 at armperiph0 A5 Watchdog Timer default period is 12 seconds arml2cc0 at armperiph0 ARM PL310 r3p3 L2 Cache Controller disabled arml2cc0 cache enabled amlogicio0 at mainbus0 amlogiccom0 at amlogicio0 port 0 console amlogiccom0 interrupting at irq 122 amlogicrng0 at amlogicio0 dwctwo0 at amlogicio0 port 0 USB controller dwctwo1 at amlogicio0 port 1 USB controller awge0

    Original URL path: http://wiki.netbsd.org/archives/2015/03/ (2016-02-01)
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