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  • Forestry Meets Backcountry Skiing: A New Partnership - New England Forestry Foundation
    Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods Forestry Meets Backcountry Skiing A New Partnership Details Created 16 December 2015 View Comments As I stood at the top of the slope I couldn t help but wonder What have I gotten myself into Below me the February sun illuminated open glades of snow between massive sugar maples and yellow birch The slope would have seemed steep in hiking boots but I would be going down on backcountry skis Fast would be the operative word I was standing in New England Forestry Foundation s Braintree Mountain Forest where a precipitous 1000 foot slope offers adventurers the risk exhilaration and rewards of wilderness backcountry skiing The previous fall Rochester Area Sports Trail Alliance RASTA board member Zac Freeman and 37 volunteers teamed up with NEFF s Director of Forest Stewardship Chris Pryor and forester John McLain to selectively remove saplings from the chosen route that might trip whip or whap a descending skier Their work left intact the species and individual trees most likely to mature into high quality productive forests And it paid off for me as over the next twenty minutes Zac Freeman David Goodman a Vermont based writer and the author of Best Backcountry Skiing in the Northeast and I whooped our way through a few perfect turns and descended safely to the bottom Unlike Zac and David I did bury myself in

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods/201-forestry-meets-backcountry-skiing-a-new-partnership (2016-02-18)
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  • New Opportunities for Forest Conservation - New England Forestry Foundation
    Form Our Initiatives Path to Sustainability Heart of New England Conservation Highlights Pingree Forest Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods New Opportunities for Forest Conservation Details Created 21 December 2015 View Comments Forests form the core of New England Forestry Foundation s work All our activities aim to improve forest health and ensure that New England remains forested forever NEFF currently owns 26 726 acres where we demonstrate the benefits of sustainable forestry including recreational opportunity improved water and air quality and wildlife habitat This year we re working to secure two new additions to NEFF s network of community forests one in the Squam Lake Watershed and the other in Coastal Connecticut The property in the Squam Lake Watershed offers spectacular views of Squam Lake and the surrounding mountains NEFF is partnering with Squam Lakes Conservation Society and Squam Lakes Association to secure the land by the end of the year ensuring permanent protection and public access On the Connecticut coast of Long Island Sound NEFF is working with the Town of East Lyme and the State of Connecticut to protect 166 acres that encompasses the headwaters of the Niantic River Keeping this land forested will help protect water quality in the Niantic and nearby Long Island sound and it will

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods/207-new-opportunities-for-forest-conservation (2016-02-18)
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  • Many Thanks! - New England Forestry Foundation
    Path to Sustainability Heart of New England Conservation Highlights Pingree Forest Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods Many Thanks Details Created 16 December 2015 View Comments With your generous support New England Forestry Foundation has become a leader in its field We own 144 forests comprising more than 26 600 acres and hold 158 conservation easements including the largest forestland conservation easement in the United States Collectively we have protected more than 1 172 132 acres Together with our supporters our efforts have conserved more New England forestland than any other non profit organization all while enhancing forest health wildlife habitat and clean air and water creating carbon offsets providing jobs and

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods/205-many-thanks (2016-02-18)
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  • Conservation Success Stories: 2015 Highlights - New England Forestry Foundation
    Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods Conservation Success Stories 2015 Highlights Details Created 16 December 2015 View Comments Kieve Wavus Education Inc Jefferson Maine conservation easement on 48 acres Thanks to the vision and persistence of two generations of Camp Kieve directors Punk Point a small promontory located across a narrow cove from the camp is under permanent protection After eight years of negotiations the camp purchased the land in 2012 to head off development threats NEFF now holds a conservation easement on 48 of the property s 52 acres with Kieve retaining the right to maintain and replace the existing structures on four acres for use in its education programs The land under easement includes two small islands and 8 840 feet of shore frontage on Damariscotta Lake It also connects to a working farm and woodland owned by the Maine Farmland Trust Sudbury Valley Trustees Boylston Massachusetts conservation restriction on 46 acres In 2014 Sudbury Valley Trustees SVT a regional land trust that has been protecting land in the Concord River watershed since the 1950s received a Massachusetts Landscape Partnership Grant Program award to protect 504 acres of farm and forest land in the towns of Boylston Northborough and Berlin As part of the larger assemblage SVT purchased the 46 acre Brissette family woodlot and subsequently donated a permanent conservation restriction to NEFF The new SVT land lies close to NEFF s 206 acre Rocky Pond Community Forest at the southern end of the Tri Town Project area The woodlot also abuts conservation land owned by the town of Berlin Donaldson Family

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods/206-conservation-success-stories-2015-highlights (2016-02-18)
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  • Into the Woods - New England Forestry Foundation
    useful to understand how successful interactions between forest landowners foresters and loggers can lead to exemplary management of a valuable and important ecological resource the forests of New England Private individuals own 70 of New England s forested landscape Therefore the health and productivity of this resource depends on the choices made by over 170 000 different landowners Understanding the role of foresters and loggers will help landowners make good business decisions improve their forests and maximize the income and ecological values of the forests for them their families and the public Unfortunately only about 20 of the harvests conducted are actually carried out under the supervision of a forester For over 70 years NEFF has advocated that landowners should use experienced educated trained and licensed foresters to help them manage their woodlands A forester is a professional who has received a degree in forestry and has the requisite experience and training In most states a forester must obtain a license to practice A forester s job is to create the management plan for a forest deciding which trees should be harvested and which trees should be left to grow These decisions balance the economic value of the trees with the health of the forest and are based on silvicultural principles or forest science Landowners hire foresters who are professionally contractually and ethically bound to work for the best interests of the landowner The forester writes the management plan to meet the landowner s goals If a harvest is called for the forester marks the trees to meet the objectives in the management plan The forester then may put the marked trees out to bid to loggers Ultimately loggers will eventually sell the timber to a log buyer or sawmill The landowner and forester review the offers and decide on the winning bidder The forester then develops a contract between the logger and the landowner for the timber sale The harvest is limited to the trees that the forester selected and marked and the forester oversees the project to ensure that only the marked trees are harvested Skilled loggers are able to remove the selected trees while minimizing the impact of the harvest to the forest ecosystem A landowner that contracts with a logger to select the trees to harvest and carry out the harvest is entering an arrangement that has an inherent conflict of interest In such an arrangement the logger because he is not a trained forester may select the wrong trees for harvest or may be inclined to select more trees than should be harvested In addition the logger could decide to harvest trees outside of the harvest plan in an effort to achieve a higher economic gain In Bob and the Trees Bob decides to harvest more trees in the middle of the job without consulting the landowner and he lies to the landowner about how the job is progressing Hiring a forester to create a management plan and oversee timber harvests are ways landowners can

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods?limitstart=0 (2016-02-18)
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  • Remembering Harris Reynolds - New England Forestry Foundation
    Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods Remembering Harris Reynolds Details Created 16 December 2015 View Comments Over seventy years ago a visionary group of foresters and land conservationists established New England Forestry Foundation to protect and manage New England s forests One of the founders Harris Reynolds left behind a legacy of sustainable forest management and conservation Described as a self starter Reynolds helped ensure the passage of the Weeks Act of 1917 establishing nearly 900 000 acres of National Forest land Along with his work conserving public lands Reynolds transplanted the European idea of community forests to the United States earning the title Father of Town Forests In July Harris s

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods/204-remembering-harris-reynolds (2016-02-18)
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  • Forest Steward of the Year: Art Lazarus - New England Forestry Foundation
    Initiatives Path to Sustainability Heart of New England Conservation Highlights Pingree Forest Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods Forest Steward of the Year Art Lazarus Details Created 16 December 2015 View Comments New England Forestry Foundation is grateful to the many forest stewards who volunteer as local ambassadors at our forests throughout the region The stewards lend their eyes and ears to the community forests and assist with local activities For 12 years Art Lazarus has demonstrated exceptional service to New England Forestry Foundation as a volunteer Forest Steward at Prouty Woods Community Forest in Littleton MA Art has led educational tours on the trails created a handbook detailing edible and medicinal

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods/203-forest-steward-of-the-year-art-lazarus (2016-02-18)
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  • Forest Champion Award: Sharon Rives and Paul Kendall - New England Forestry Foundation
    Highlights Pingree Forest Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods Forest Champion Award Sharon Rives and Paul Kendall Details Created 16 December 2015 View Comments Each year New England Forestry Foundation recognizes individuals who exemplify excellence in their dedication to forest conservation and sustainable forest management At our annual meeting in June the board and staff were pleased to present Sharon Rives and Paul Kendall with our annual Forest Champion Award In the 1970s Paul and Sharon began assembling forestland in Braintree Vermont with the vision of protecting the headwaters of the Riford Brook watershed from development and to maintain the traditional mixture of forest products and non motorized public recreational uses They

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods/202-forest-champion-award-sharon-rives-and-paul-kendall (2016-02-18)
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