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  • How to Conserve Your Land \| New England Forestry Foundation - New England Forestry Foundation
    Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Land Conservation Forestry Education How to Conserve Your Land Conservation organizations do not save land landowners do NEFF works to help landowners reach their conservation goals Options include land donations conservation easements and planned giving as well as other innovative methods NEFF owns over 140 forests totaling more than 26 000 acres Most of these are Memorial Forests named to perpetually honor the donor or their family These forests are carefully managed to continue to yield the flow of benefits and products The forest management program on lands held by NEFF fulfill the longstanding goal of teaching private forestland owners the benefits of sustainable forestry To this end they are all demonstration forests Additionally the forests are NEFF s endowment and as such they are an important source of operating revenue This is generated through sustainable timber sales Our forests are currently Forest Stewardship Council certified as well as independently certified by the American Tree Farm System NEFF has been holding Conservation Easements for private landowners since 1976 Currently we hold easements on more than 150 different properties totaling 1 145 000 acres Conservation easements or restrictions are great ways to keep your land in the family in traditional land uses minimize your tax liability and preserve open space and habitat By donating a conservation easement to NEFF you will be able to keep your forest working as a sustainably

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/conservation/how-to-conserve-land (2016-02-18)
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  • Landowner Options for Land Conservation \| New England Forestry Foundation - New England Forestry Foundation
    few land conservation organizations that actively manages its properties to yield the continuous flow of wood products and environmental benefits Most of these properties are Memorial Forests named to perpetually honor the donor or their family NEFF considers its woodlands to be part of its endowment portfolio which provide income from wood products to support its conservation work The straightforward gift of a land parcel is the simplest way to transfer ownership Making a gift is as easy as drafting a deed This technique offers the maximum tax advantages to the donor because the charitable gift deduction is generally based on the full fair market value of the property An appraisal obtained by the donor substantiates this value for IRS deduction purposes Donation of conservation easement A conservation easement is a legal agreement between a landowner the grantor and a conservation organization or public agency the grantee or holder The agreement separates the rights to exercise more intensive uses such as construction subdivision and mining from other rights of ownership These development rights are then transferred to the grantee through the conservation easement deed The grantee agrees to hold but not use the development rights and to ensure that they are not used by anyone else effectively the development rights are extinguished Conservation easements are granted in perpetuity and apply to the land regardless of who may own it in the future Donation of an easement brings a package of benefits that potentially includes a federal income tax deduction reductions in both federal and state estate taxes a state income tax credit and occasionally a property tax savings Provided that the land has natural conservation value there are virtually no geographic constraints on donated easements For more information about conservation easements see our Questions and Answers for Landowners page Planned

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/conservation/land-conservation-options (2016-02-18)
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  • Easement Monitoring Program \| New England Forestry Foundation - New England Forestry Foundation
    our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Land Conservation Forestry Education Easement Monitoring Most conservation easements are forever legal diamonds if you will In order to ensure that the conservation values continue to be protected in perpetuity holders of easements have found it wise to check in on these values regularly This process begins with the Baseline Documentation Report This report serves as a record of the property and the conservation values detailed in the easement at the beginning of the easement It is meant to serve as a reference to which all future monitoring efforts will compare in order to determine if any unacceptable changes have occurred Thereafter regular easement monitoring is paramount to maintaining conservation values and getting ahead of any issues that may arise Because conservation easements are diverse some were written with unclear language others with unclear property descriptions and few foresaw future issues that are now current such as carbon credits or invasive species control Regular easement visits allow organizations like NEFF to maintain a close relationship with the landowner facilitate a dynamic understanding of the conservation easement and these emerging issues and also remain vigilant about any developing encroachments or violations For large easements we use a three tiered approach to monitoring Remote sensing serves to focus our review of aerial imagery which serves to focus our visits on the ground For smaller easements we

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/conservation/easement-monitoring (2016-02-18)
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  • Conservation FAQs \| New England Forestry Foundation - New England Forestry Foundation
    does not dictate specific forest management prescriptions to the landowner but when working with another organization landowners should be sure to ask how the organization handles forest management activities What if I don t want the public to have access to my land can I still put it under easement As a general rule public access is not a requirement Landowners are able to choose whether or not they wish to allow public access to their land when they place it under easement However if public funding is used to conserve a property use of those funds might requirethat public access to the property be allowed Will conserving my land make me unable to sell it or to will it to my heirs No A conservation easement does not affect your ability to sell or will your land in any way though the easement will prevent development of the land and thus could lower its marketable value However the terms of the easement will apply to the land regardless of who may own it in the future III TAXES How does a conservation easement affect the local property tax paid on the property Different states have different rules on the assessment of property encumbered by a conservation easement but as a general rule the assessed value of easement encumbered land will be based on its open space forest and or agricultural value If the property is enrolled in a current use taxation program the easement does not affect program enrollment and the property taxes are likely to stay the same If the property is not enrolled in such a program then the property tax could be lowered significantly once the easement is placed on the property since the property no longer is developable To learn more about current use taxation programs visit our Landowner Resources page and click on your state of interest IV LEGAL CONCERNS APPRAISALS AND MORTGAGES Do I need a lawyer if I want to place a conservation easement on my property Yes We advise that landowners secure qualified legal counsel to assist them in the decision making process and to review legal documents Placing a conservation easement on your property can have significant land use income tax and estate planning consequences and such a decision should be made with the advice of competent legal counsel Do I need a title report for my property Yes An updated title report is a prerequisite to placing an easement on the property and it is important to get a title report early in the process in order to avoid complications and delays later This is an expense borne by the landowner Does a conservation easement on my property affect my borrowing power Not necessarily The property still may have significant value when encumbered by a conservation easement The easement itself does not restrict the ability to use the property as collateral for borrowing Who obtains the appraisal to determine the value of the conservation easement for tax purposes How

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/conservation/conservation-faqs (2016-02-18)
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  • Sustainable Forestry \| New England Forestry Foundation - New England Forestry Foundation
    Process Current Harvests Wharton Plantation harvest Allen Whitney Memorial Forest Harvest Chamberlain Reynolds Memorial Forest Harvest Nadeau Forest harvest Sortwell Memorial Forest harvest Forestry FAQs Education Volunteer Form Our Initiatives Path to Sustainability Heart of New England Conservation Highlights Pingree Forest Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Land Conservation Forestry Education Forestry Since 1944 the New England Forestry Foundation has been dedicated to promoting the sound and sustainable management of our region s private forestlands Today we hold over 140 forests totaling more than 26 000 acres which demonstrate sustainable forestry for wood wildlife habitat biodiversity and education Our woodlands are certified by the American Tree Farm System and also certified to Forest Stewardship Council standards By passing

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/forestry (2016-02-18)
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  • Our Process - New England Forestry Foundation
    regularly and to keep up with advances in forestry and ecology Harvests To conduct each harvest we collaborate with local consulting foresters who are professionals trained in forestry and licensed by the state They represent our best interests as landowners and develop our management plans work with us to plan activities and oversee the details of each harvest Depending upon our goals harvests are conducted on each property every 10 to 20 years For each harvest our Director of Forest Stewardship collaborates with the appropriate consulting forester on the goals strategy and timing of the harvest In some states an Intent to Cut must be posted at the harvest In other states such as Massachusetts a Forest Cutting Plan must be submitted to and approved by the State prior to any work being started Once these details are in place our forester can complete the details of the harvest and identify a logger to do the work Our foresters individually mark each tree to be harvested or they may outline an area to be harvested if multiple smaller trees are to be taken Typically they make these determinations by gauging the location health size and anticipated longevity of each tree they evaluate There are more complex factors that must be considered but generally speaking those factors help determine which trees are best candidates for removal In addition they also mark the landing anticipated skid trails i e trails that the machinery will use for removal of trees and any potential wetland or stream crossings that will occur on the site If any permitting is required they also handle those details to be sure that the sale is fully operational Once trees are marked and the loggers are hired the loggers are tasked with removing only the trees that the forester

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/forestry/our-process (2016-02-18)
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  • Current Harvests - New England Forestry Foundation
    to Conserve Land Land Conservation Options Easement Monitoring Conservation FAQs Forestry Our Process Current Harvests Wharton Plantation harvest Allen Whitney Memorial Forest Harvest Chamberlain Reynolds Memorial Forest Harvest Nadeau Forest harvest Sortwell Memorial Forest harvest Forestry FAQs Education Volunteer Form Our Initiatives Path to Sustainability Heart of New England Conservation Highlights Pingree Forest Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Land Conservation Forestry Education Recent Harvests New England Forestry Foundation is dedicated to promoting sound forest stewardship in our region We seek to lead by example implementing a number of timber harvests on our woodlands each year Below is a list of our most recent and upcoming harvests We encourage you to learn more about our activities and to

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/forestry/current-harvests (2016-02-18)
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  • Wharton Plantation harvest - New England Forestry Foundation
    Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Land Conservation Forestry Education Wharton Plantation harvest The 2012 2013 timber sale at the Wharton Plantation continues the shelterwood harvesting techniques that were conducted within these 83 acres of white pine and red pine stands in the late 1980 s and early 1990 s The primary goal of the timber harvest was to remove mature sawtimber sized trees for lumber and poor quality hardwood and softwood trees for firewood and wood chips in order to improve the growing conditions of the developing high quality poles and small sawtimber sized trees that will remain in the forest and continue to grow at an accelerated rate Releasing advanced white pine regeneration was also a goal for future production with a desire to establish more white pine regeneration in the understory and maintain an unevenaged forest structure into the future Wildlife habitats have been enhanced

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/what-we-do/forestry/current-harvests/wharton-plantation-harvest (2016-02-18)
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