archive-org.com » ORG » N » NEWENGLANDFORESTRY.ORG

Total: 127

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • For Land Trusts - New England Forestry Foundation
    Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Hawley FAQs For Land Trusts Land trusts represent the bedrock of land conservation across the United States The 2010 National Land Trust Census Report states that total acres conserved by state local and national land trusts grew to 47 million as of year end 2010 an increase of about 10 million acres since 2005 and 23 million since 2000 New England Forestry Foundation working with its many partners and as part of its new Heart of New England Initiative is dedicated to working with land trusts throughout the region in an effort to promote and advance multiple large scale collaborative projects that will significantly accelerate the pace of conservation To further this work New England Forestry Foundation has developed a series of tools and templates

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/resources/for-land-trusts (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Land Trust Toolkit 1.0 - New England Forestry Foundation
    and wildlands where natural processes are dominant but may be adapted to conserve other types of resources such as farmland wildlife habitat watersheds riparian or recreational corridors This Tool Kit provides the user with a wide array of resources to help forge strong collaborations identify critical resources in a region secure funding to support an ambitious conservation strategy develop systems for managing a high volume of transactions reach and engage landowners in sustained partnerships and ensure effective stewardship in perpetuity Development of the Tool Kit is an evolutionary process and we welcome your feedback for future editions If you have any questions comments or suggestions please contact Annette Ermini at So what s in the Tool Kit 1 Strategies and Tools for Forming Effective Land Trust Collaborations To encourage partnerships among conservation organizations and agencies across a defined landscape to engage in Land Trust Collaboration the Tool Kit provides Strategies and work plans for convening organizations of different missions and sizes to create a shared vision and case statement for Land Trust Collaboration Methods for defining a Region creating a Vision and a Case Statement for a unified project from several organization s individual conservation plans and lists of landowner prospects ensuring that the project has significant conservation value where the Land Trust Collaboration is more valuable than the sum of the parts Model Memoranda of Understanding MOU to spell out the roles and responsibilities of the different participating organizations 2 Strategies and Tools to Support Planning and Conducting Joint Fundraising To facilitate coordinated action to jointly raise acquisition funds the Tool Kit provides Guidelines and methods for conducting a shared feasibility study to assess the prospects for collaborative fundraising to support a Land Trust Collaboration project Model MOU for raising and administering Land Trust Collaboration funds Principles of capital

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/resources/for-land-trusts/land-trust-toolkit-1-0 (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hawley FAQs - New England Forestry Foundation
    community forests open to the public for many activities dawn to dusk NEFF often partners with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts on conservation For example our Hawley property is bounded on two sides by a State forest Our protection and management of properties provides a similar level of protection and public access as state ownership and the state often relies on private charitable organizations to fill in these kinds of gaps in state owned conservation land saving the taxpayers money And the burdens of government relieved by our work are not limited to providing public recreation Conservation lands protect sensitive habitats support songbirds trout bear otter and other wildlife reduce floods downstream by storing and gradually releasing water sustain stream flows during droughts extract climate altering excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere provide a sustainable source of wood products to the region help us supply more of our energy needs from local sources such as biomass heating sustain pollinators that enable successful crops attract billions of dollars of tourism business to the state during leaf peeping season and provide the beauty and backdrop of our cities and towns Even though all of NEFF s properties are open for public access and enjoyment the test of access is not and should not be the only litmus test for NEFF or other conservation organizations Massachusetts law clearly states the test should be whether a conservation organization is fulfilling its stated mission on any particular property in question Our Hawley property and all our properties are clearly used or occupied in accordance with NEFF s mission There can be legitimate conservation interests of the public and charitable organizations that require limits on public access Fragile ecosystems habitat for endangered species drinking water supplies seasonal breeding habitat for shorebirds forestlands undergoing harvest and farmland all call for some access restrictions at times In addition some land locked parcels are owned and protected by conservation organization in service of a valid conservation goal but access may be temporarily or permanently unavailable because of other private ownerships that block access to a public way But even without public access almost all of those properties provide public benefits such as clean water clean air wildlife habitat aesthetic beauty or a timber supply for future generations Since NEFF s focus is on forestland suitable for timber production fewer of our properties require limitations on public access compared with sister organizations that may specialize in protecting rare wildlife habitat That is why we generally are able to keep our community forests open to the public While NEFF wants to win this case to resolve and secure its own tax exempt status issues we also want to support our sister conservation organizations who hold these special habitats in trust as a core part of their work We believe the assessors should leave the judgment of access limits to the conservationists who are charged with maintaining these assets How big a deal is the tax bill in Hawley The actual tax bill

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/resources/hawley-faqs (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Blog - New England Forestry Foundation
    Form Our Initiatives Path to Sustainability Heart of New England Conservation Highlights Pingree Forest Partnership Downeast Lakes Forestry Partnership Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership Special Programs Explore our Woods Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods Into the Woods The Deep Woods New England Forestry Foundation blogs Welcome to New England Forestry Foundation s two blogs newly initiated in February 2014 Into the Woods is a look at current events news and research connected to the New England woods and a bit of the lighter side of our work If you care about New England s trees and forests then come Into the Woods with us The Deep Woods includes deeper dives on topics where New England Forestry Foundation brings unique expertise and offers a level of detail that will be useful to professionals

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Into the Woods - New England Forestry Foundation
    useful to understand how successful interactions between forest landowners foresters and loggers can lead to exemplary management of a valuable and important ecological resource the forests of New England Private individuals own 70 of New England s forested landscape Therefore the health and productivity of this resource depends on the choices made by over 170 000 different landowners Understanding the role of foresters and loggers will help landowners make good business decisions improve their forests and maximize the income and ecological values of the forests for them their families and the public Unfortunately only about 20 of the harvests conducted are actually carried out under the supervision of a forester For over 70 years NEFF has advocated that landowners should use experienced educated trained and licensed foresters to help them manage their woodlands A forester is a professional who has received a degree in forestry and has the requisite experience and training In most states a forester must obtain a license to practice A forester s job is to create the management plan for a forest deciding which trees should be harvested and which trees should be left to grow These decisions balance the economic value of the trees with the health of the forest and are based on silvicultural principles or forest science Landowners hire foresters who are professionally contractually and ethically bound to work for the best interests of the landowner The forester writes the management plan to meet the landowner s goals If a harvest is called for the forester marks the trees to meet the objectives in the management plan The forester then may put the marked trees out to bid to loggers Ultimately loggers will eventually sell the timber to a log buyer or sawmill The landowner and forester review the offers and decide on the winning bidder The forester then develops a contract between the logger and the landowner for the timber sale The harvest is limited to the trees that the forester selected and marked and the forester oversees the project to ensure that only the marked trees are harvested Skilled loggers are able to remove the selected trees while minimizing the impact of the harvest to the forest ecosystem A landowner that contracts with a logger to select the trees to harvest and carry out the harvest is entering an arrangement that has an inherent conflict of interest In such an arrangement the logger because he is not a trained forester may select the wrong trees for harvest or may be inclined to select more trees than should be harvested In addition the logger could decide to harvest trees outside of the harvest plan in an effort to achieve a higher economic gain In Bob and the Trees Bob decides to harvest more trees in the middle of the job without consulting the landowner and he lies to the landowner about how the job is progressing Hiring a forester to create a management plan and oversee timber harvests are ways landowners can

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/into-the-woods (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Into the Woods Blog - New England Forestry Foundation
    in complex and powerful symbolism The woods can be forbidding at times dank untamed places where who knows what kind of critters might lurk in the underbrush fisher cats or salamanders or in the tree canopy ready to fly out and spook you owls and bats Of course there is another side to the woods the peaceful cool sun dappled places of reflection where we go to escape our hectic civilized lives These woods in Robert Frost s words are lovely dark and deep This is where many of us find spiritual renewal just by being out in nature Just like in the movies the forest holds solutions for us too In early New England when our states were only colonies most of the continent was covered with vast impenetrable forest While the woods provided valuable resources edible nuts and fruits wood for building and burning the early settlers also viewed the woods as a barrier in the way of agriculture and removed most of them Our woods have re grown over the past century but clearing for development now carves into forests creating more permanent losses Today as conservation organizations like NEFF work toward a sustainable future for our beloved New England woods we too need more than wishful thinking We need well thought out plans and focused action to protect enough forests to provide communities with clean air and water through the inevitable changes that lie ahead We also need to learn how to manage some of our woodlands to produce sustainably harvested wood products to meet local needs and build markets that provide income to people who want to keep their forests standing And we need to remember that our woods are places of refuge for us and for wildlife that depends on them I Wish this holiday that when we re not at the movies we can find time to venture Into the Woods near home I hope that we like Robert Frost can stop by woods on a snowy evening and find sustaining meaning there Lisa Hayden who grew up near the woods in Connecticut is Landowner Outreach Coordinator for the New England Forestry Foundation Add a comment The Coolest Blanket Details Created 03 March 2014 By guest contributor Martine Wong To the ire of commuters and delight of children we awoke today to a familiar scene the land around us blanketed with fresh snow A hallmark of New England as iconic as old stone walls and maple syrup white winters offer numerous opportunities to get outside and revel in the natural world And this year s impressive volume of snow serves another purpose it functions as a protective blanket to the natural world beneath Newly fallen snow contains a high percentage of trapped air which traps heat and helps keep the ground warm just like a down comforter but bigger Snow acts as a powerful insulator preserving perennials for the next season and providing agreeable accommodations for animals to hibernate Voles and mice don

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/blog/the-deep-woods (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • For Landowners - New England Forestry Foundation
    Explore our Forests Recreation Guidelines Harvest Walks Safety in our Woods Volunteer Hunting FAQs Hunting on Our Land Support our Work Donate Leave a Legacy Volunteer Events Resources The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners General Resources Connecticut landowners Maine landowners Massachusetts landowners New Hampshire landowners Vermont landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Land Trust Toolkit 1 0 Hawley FAQs Blog Into the Woods The Deep Woods The Place You Call Home Massachusetts Forest Scenarios Study News Room Publications For Landowners For Foresters For Land Trusts Hawley FAQs For Landowners As a landowner you have many concerns You love your woods and you want to be sure that you protect them for the future Perhaps you have come here because you are considering a timber harvest to offset an unexpected expense Or you may have received an unexpected solicitation about the trees on your land and are not certain what to do Where do you start How can you be sure that your land is protected As fellow landowners we understand the challenges of owning and managing land for natural diversity wildlife habitat beauty and recreation and you are invited to explore these

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/index.php/resources/for-landowners (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heart of New England - New England Forestry Foundation
    comprehensive response to the sweeping conservation vision proposed in the Harvard Forest report Wildlands and Woodlands A Vision for the New England Forest This long range vision proposes that by 2060 at least 70 of the region 30 million acres should be conserved as forestland that remains free from development thereby allowing natural and human communities to flourish New England Forestry Foundation is well positioned to play a major role in helping to meet the goal of conserving 30 million acres by 2060 by focusing on three key program areas targeted at our three central constituencies 1 Forest Landowner Outreach and Education This program is focused on developing and testing a replicable model for engaging educating and supporting family forest landowners who embrace the values of better forest management and large scale land protection With guidance from an expert panel of communication specialists and advice from a group of conservation practitioners we will develop a prototype for implementation in the MassConn Sustainable Forest Partnership area one of the 33 current Regional Conservation Partnerships in New England We will test evaluate and adapt our approach until we have a model ready for implementation in other Regional Conservation Partnerships 2 Land Trust Collaboration Services New England Forestry Foundation offers a team of advisors who are inspiring organizing and supporting the region s 500 land trusts as they identify and complete large scale land conservation projects As of 2013 at least 33 Regional Conservation Partnerships have emerged to promote collaboration among land trusts and their partners The team has developed a series of tools and techniques a Land Trust Collaboration Tool Kit to assist collaborations in reaching their conservation goals This Tool Kit contains items such as sample memoranda of understanding to guide and manage collaborative activities conservation easement templates and tools for

    Original URL path: http://newenglandforestry.org/index.php/our-initiatives/heart-of-new-england (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •