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  • Seed Collection — New England Wild Flower Society
    of NY City Department of Parks and Recreation are undertaking the first large scale coordinated seed banking effort in the eastern United States The Society and its partners will make at least 1 200 seed collections from native locally adapted plants for restoration of sub tidal habitats and dunes wetlands salt marshes near coastal freshwater habitats coastal forests and inland rivers and streams from Virginia to Maine PRESS COVERAGE Learn more about the project at Planning For the Next Big One Effort Aims to Sock Away Seeds New Hampshire Public Radio September 16 Seed Collecting Program Designed To Restore Wetlands Hartford Courant September 14 Part Of Housatonic River In Pittsfield To Get A Makeover New England Public Radio September 8 Replanting Project Focuses on Repairing Sandy Damaged Coast The New York Times September 7 The AP picked up the story and it ran in more than 230 media outlets Notes The project which is funded through the national Seeds of Success program led by the Bureau of Land Management is part of the federal response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy which inundated coastal habitats with salt water smothered them in sand or washed the vegetation out to sea

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/seed-collection-for-coastal-restoration.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Collaborations — New England Wild Flower Society
    Programs Seed Banking Controlling Invasives Flora Conservanda Conservation and Research Plans Conservation Department Services Document Actions Collaborations Up one level NEPCoP A collaboration of professional botanists state agencies and conservation organizations in each New England State Read More Plant Conservation Volunteers A program to recruit and train amateur field botanists to perform much needed conservation work throughout New England Read More CPC Center for Plant Conservation Read More Natural Heritage

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/collaborations (2016-04-30)
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  • Seed Banking — New England Wild Flower Society
    can provide material for research or reintroduction without harming fragile wild populations This strategy is a complement to not a substitute for protecting plants in the wild Priority for accession into the Society s seed bank is given to species that exist at only a few sites are declining rapidly or are not currently protected Society staff and volunteers collect seed from as many individuals as possible without damaging the

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/seed-bank (2016-04-30)
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  • Invasive Plants — New England Wild Flower Society
    introduced here as horticultural plants About 60 of invasive species introductions result from horticultural activity Conservation activities introduced about 30 of invasive plants mostly for screening windbreak and erosion control but also to supply food and cover for wildlife Accidental introductions make up the remaining 10 For example purple loosestrife was first brought to the U S in the hold of a ship via ballast water then later introduced for horticultural purposes Some species may be native to regions of North America where they are not invasive black locust for example but arrive in new regions through assisted range expansion or transportation to other parts of the country for ornamental purposes where they can become invasive With the increase in world travel and trade aggressive species can spread themselves around the globe As people traverse the continents plants travel as hitchhiking seeds on shoes and in clothing Why are we concerned According to the North Carolina Botanical Gardens Biota of North America study at least 4 000 species of non native plants occur outside cultivation in the United States Most of these species cause few problems but 79 species cost the U S economy more than 97 billion annually in lost crops failed recovery efforts for endangered species and control efforts Invasive species have contributed to the decline of 42 of U S endangered and threatened species for 18 of U S endangered or threatened species invasives are the main cause of decline Invasive species compete directly with native species for moisture sunlight nutrients and space Moreover some studies suggest that the fruit produced by invasives may not be as nutritious for local wildlife requiring them to eat more frequently Fruits and seeds of invasive species are the junk food of the natural world Why are invasive species so successful Most species have predators in their natural range that keep their population numbers in check When new species are introduced however they come without their natural predators Most invasive species produce copious amounts of seed This seed is often bird or wind dispersed allowing it to cover great distances in a short period of time Some invasives have aggressive root systems that can spread long distances from a single plant These root systems often grow so densely that they smother the root systems of surrounding vegetation Some species produce chemicals in their leaves or root systems that inhibit the growth of other plants around them Most invasives cast extremely dense shade beneath which native vegetation can not survive Most invasives thrive on disturbed soil such as that around newly developed land or along highways As our region becomes more fragmented through development local habitats become more vulnerable to invasives What can we do about them Many private organizations and government agencies are beginning to look at this very serious environmental problem seeking solutions It appears that areas with intact highly diverse or complex systems are more resistant to invasion and dominance by exotic species so increased protection of areas of

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/controlling-invasives (2016-04-30)
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  • Flora Conservanda — New England Wild Flower Society
    are considered historic to New England though they may exist elsewhere in the U S or the world and plants whose status in the region was undetermined at the time but believed to be rare The 2012 list is a revision of the original document published as the 1996 edition of Rhodora the Journal of the New England Botanical Club We revised the list for 2012 based on research accumulated over the preceding 15 years including taxonomic studies and field research by professionals and volunteers We added species based on their rarity in the wild and we removed others because we learned that they are more common than previously understood or else our taxonomic understanding of the species changed so that it is no longer considered rare in New England We regard the 2012 list as a snapshot of plant rarity in New England at that time Information such as the number of extant populations state rarity ranks and endangerment codes may no longer be current For more recent data please consult the latest state endangerment status and state ranks on Heritage Program websites In 2014 we published an article analyzing the changes revealed between 1996 and 2012 The article

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/flora-conservanda (2016-04-30)
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  • Conservation and Research Plans — New England Wild Flower Society
    the region s most endangered plant species Each plan includes a description of the distribution and range of the subject plant the species biology current and historical status of each New England occurrence goals for the plant s protection and recommended conservation actions The plans provide information that public and private landowners can use to help successfully manage rare species on their properties The utility and importance of these plans is already apparent Both state and federal agencies use the findings and recommendations as the basis for management and funding allocation and the Society s large group of volunteers and interns are performing management tasks recommended by the plans at a variety of sites throughout New England View and Print Following is a list of the published Conservation and Research Plans They are all in Adobe Acrobat pdf format You can save these files to your computer by right clicking the link and selecting Save As Adiantum viridimontanum Agastache nepetoides Agastache scrophulariifolia Ageratina aromatica Amerorchis rotundifolia Aplectrum hyemale Aristolochia serpentaria Asclepias purpurascens Aster concolor Symphyotrichum concolor Botrychium lunaria Bouteloua curtipendula Calystegia spithamaea Carex atherodes Carex barrattii Carex crawei Carex davisii Carex garberi and Triantha glutinosa Carex lupuliformis Carex polymorpha Carex richardsonii Carex wiegandii Castilleja coccinea Chamaelirium luteum Corydalis flavula Cynoglossum virginianum var boreale Cyperus houghtonii Descurainia pinnata Desmodium cuspidatum Diphasiastrum sitchense Doellingeria infirma Draba glabella Draba reptans Echinodorus tenellus Eleocharis microcarpa Eleocharis quadrangulata Eleocharis tricostata Eriocaulon parkeri Eupatorium leucolepis var novae angliae Eupatorium novae angliae Eupatorium novae angliae Floerkea proserpinacoides Goodyera oblongifolia Hackelia deflexa var americana Hasteola suaveolens Hieracium robinsonii Hydrastis canadensis Hydrophyllum canadense Hypericum adpressum Juncus torreyi Juncus vaseyi Liatris borealis Liatris scariosa var novae angliae Liatris scariosa var novae angliae Linum sulcatum Liparis liliifolia Listera auriculata Listera australis Listera convallarioides Listera cordata Ludwigia polycarpa Ludwigia sphaerocarpa Lycopodiella alopecuroides

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/conservation-research-plans.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Conservation Department Services — New England Wild Flower Society
    New England s native flora and offer contract based botanical and ecological services throughout the region With more than 50 years of combined native plant conservation experience we strive to provide services that conserve and promote the region s native plants and diverse landscapes Our staff members are trained field botanists ecologists horticulturalists and educators who hold graduate and undergraduate degrees in related fields Having worked directly with state listed rare plant species in every natural community type throughout the region our team has the expertise and experience to assess the health of natural landscapes understand ecological connections within landscapes identify an area s full range of vascular plants and plan and implement ecological management plans Our services Rare and common terrestrial and upland plants survey inventory and mapping Natural communities survey inventory mapping and long term monitoring Rare plant conservation identification long term monitoring and restoration Habitat assessment management augmentation and restoration Invasive plant identification and management Development of conservation and management plans Training programs Consulting services Our clients F ederal and state agencies municipalities land trusts and other conservation organizations Staff members are trained herbicide applicators and carry Core Applicator s licenses in the State of Massachusetts We

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/conservation-department-services.html (2016-04-30)
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  • NEPCoP — New England Wild Flower Society
    in the protection of New England s endangered plants to form NEPCoP It became the nation s first regional integrated conservation program Today approximately 140 professionals represent 68 different public agencies nonprofit organizations universities land trusts state parks and environmental consulting companies All State Heritage Programs the U S Fish and Wildlife Service The Nature Conservancy National Park Service University of Connecticut Massachusetts Audubon and the New England Botanical Club are represented New England Wild Flower Society provides funding and staff for NEPCoP and administers the program with guidance from a Regional Advisory Council RAC and Task Forces in the six New England states Task Forces made up of experts in each state s flora are the heart of the program They select priority species for survey and seed collection and evaluate results yearly RAC provides input on regional policy and develops the Flora Conservanda a list of regionally endangered plants The program integrates in situ field actions survey habitat management reintroduction with ex situ off site efforts seed banking research propagation By coordinating regional state based plant conservation NEPCoP helps avoid duplication of effort and provides sharing of data thus making the best use of limited conservation resources The

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/collaborations/nepcop.htm (2016-04-30)
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