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  • Plant Conservation Volunteers — New England Wild Flower Society
    basic intent of the PCV Program is to gain a more current assessment of the status of rare plant species in New England The Society staff and state botanists decide which rare plant populations volunteers will monitor PCVs sign up for surveys at the training session conduct site visits during the field season and fill out rare plant survey forms Filling out survey forms involves recording such information as the number of plants if found and their condition Where volunteers note threats or population declines the information is used to help determine the best strategies for protection Courses and field trips Trips and courses are led by professional botanists and land managers providing an opportunity for PCVs to learn more about identification ecology and conservation in the field Habitat management A variety of habitat management projects are offered for volunteers to help protect rare plant populations from threats including natural succession and invasive species Botanical inventory PCVs help the Society staff conduct floristic and plant community inventories for municipal and private property owners to guide appropriate land management decisions Qualifications We are looking for people who have some botanical knowledge who are committed to conservation and who have good observation skills a sense of adventure and a few spare days over the course of the field season roughly from May through October Volunteers need to arrange their own transportation We are ESPECIALLY looking for people outside of Eastern Massachusetts or are willing to travel long distances or out of state for surveys Commitment Flexible depending on the volunteer s schedule Training New volunteers must participate in an annual volunteer training session in March and April The training sessions provide an overview of the volunteer program directions for conducting rare plant monitoring a presentation on the plant species to be surveyed

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/volunteers/plant-conservation.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Bring Native Plants into Your Landscape — New England Wild Flower Society
    Gardening at New England Wild Flower Society What is a Native Plant Native refers to plants growing in New England before European settlement and includes woody plants trees shrubs and vines and non woody or herbaceous plants flowering perennials ferns grasses Why grow native plants Native plants are the most sustainable choice for home gardeners Beautiful hardy and varied they provide essential food and shelter for our region s wildlife and help to maintain New England s unique sense of place When you plant New England native plants you replace crucial habitat bulldozed every day to construct new buildings roads and infrastructure How to choose the right plant for your place Check out these key resources to help identify plants for your home garden Go Botany Learn about native species in New England and check other common garden plants to see which are native Garden Shops When you buy native plants from the Society you support native plant conservation and research See our ample selection of native plants on sale at Garden in the Woods and Nasami Farm Nursery and browse our CSA and Plant Collections Invasive plants brochure Be sure not to plant invasive species one of the chief

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/grow/bring-native-plants-into-your-landscape.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Grow — New England Wild Flower Society
    Our Programs Native New England Shrubs Introduction to Designing with Native Plants Watercolor in the Garden Basic Wetland ID and Delineation Introduction to Native Ferns Introduction to Native Ferns Understanding Scale in the Garden Shady Edibles Pollinators in Peril Understanding and Managing Soils Yankee Garden Tour Natives Pollinators and Your Backyard Niquette Bay State Park North Truro Dunes Walk Schoodic Point Trillium Week May 9 15 New England Plant Diversity Session 2 What Role Do Nativars Play in an Ecological Landscape Arbor Day Celebration and Tree Giveaway Understanding Trilliums Story Time and Musical Play at Garden in the Woods New England Plant Diversity Session 3 Low Maintenance Design with Native Plants Native Plants for Professionals Native Herbaceous Plant Materials Late Season New England Plant Diversity Session 4 New England Plant Diversity Session 5 Wildflowers of New England Introduction to Plant Families Native Herbaceous Plant Materials Early Season Landscape for Life Native New England Shrubs Wildflowers of New England Vernal Pools are Cool Webinar Twenty Great Native Plants for Your Garden New England Plant Diversity Session 1 Wetland Shrubs Survey of Grasses of the Northeast Wildflowers of Maine Wildflowers of New Hampshire Conservation Biology Urban Gardening Series Tough Plants for Tough Places Urban Gardening Series Pruning Fundamentals Urban Gardening Series Planting Basics Watertown Life Friendly Gardens Tour Family Hike Acton Arboretum Bog Chapman Pond Odiorne Point State Park Old Pepper Place Nature Reserve Orono Bog Vossburg Hills Plants 102 Deeper into the Green World Wildflower Walk With Mary The Audubon of Botany Hydric Soils Mushrooms for Beginners Plant Form and Function Designing Gardens for Small Spaces Native Woody Plant Materials Plants and Pints Devil s Den Gifford Woods State Park Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary Waterboro Barrens New England Plant Communities Botanic Inventory Methods Placemakers Lecture Wildflowers of Rhode Island Wildflowers of Vermont

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/grow/sitemap (2016-04-30)
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  • Buy Native Plants — New England Wild Flower Society
    Order in Advance Make sure your garden dreams come true take advantage of New England Wild Flower Society s advance ordering programs Anticipated Plant Availability List For Garden in the Woods and Nasami Farm pdf download New England Native Plant Collections Choose from seven groupings of eight plants each designed to fill a specific garden niche New England Native Plant CSA Purchase a share of our Edible Natives or Woodland

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/grow/store/buy-native-plants (2016-04-30)
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  • Ecoregions of New England — New England Wild Flower Society
    Shops Blog Membership Search Site Advanced Search You are here Home Grow Ecoregions of New England Site Map Buy Native Plants Ecoregions of New England Pollinators Document Actions Ecoregions of New England For a higher resolution version click the map below or download the PDF at the bottom of the page last modified May 14 2014 Related content pdf EcoRegionsMap pdf Contact Us Donate Now Resources Press Subscribe to E

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/grow/ecoregions-of-new-england.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Planting for Pollinators — New England Wild Flower Society
    Month Document Actions Planting for Pollinators Native plants for pollinators In order to reproduce about 80 percent of the world s flowering plants require animal pollinators such as hummingbirds bats butterflies and bees These pollinators sustain ecosystems by stimulating the growth of seeds and fruits on which other animals feed They also make agriculture possible Today some pollinators are experiencing alarming decline due to habitat destruction and pesticide use European honeybees and Monarch butterflies garner most of the headlines but native bees including the native bumblebee are also at risk While stocking your garden with native plants will not entirely solve the problem it does help provide support for these essential creatures Keep in mind that pollinators do not live by nectar alone They need water and shelter as well as food and food requirements differ depending on the life stage of the pollinator Baby hummingbirds eat regurgitated insects caterpillars the larval stage of butterflies and moths eat leaves bee larvae eat a mix of pollen and nectar But providing for pollinators doesn t have to be complicated Most of these plants are readily available and easy to maintain And as this sample of some great pollinator plants suggests they

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/grow/pollinators (2016-04-30)
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  • Resources — New England Wild Flower Society
    Search Site Advanced Search You are here Home Resources Document Actions Resources Click a cover to view the PDF Invasives Brochure Know them don t grow them State of the Plants Brief 10 pgs Technical Report 73 pgs Conservation News These back issues of Conservation News are out of print but not out of date download free copies here last modified January 08 2016 Contact Us Donate Now Resources Press

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/resources/conservation-news.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Invasive Plants — New England Wild Flower Society
    introduced here as horticultural plants About 60 of invasive species introductions result from horticultural activity Conservation activities introduced about 30 of invasive plants mostly for screening windbreak and erosion control but also to supply food and cover for wildlife Accidental introductions make up the remaining 10 For example purple loosestrife was first brought to the U S in the hold of a ship via ballast water then later introduced for horticultural purposes Some species may be native to regions of North America where they are not invasive black locust for example but arrive in new regions through assisted range expansion or transportation to other parts of the country for ornamental purposes where they can become invasive With the increase in world travel and trade aggressive species can spread themselves around the globe As people traverse the continents plants travel as hitchhiking seeds on shoes and in clothing Why are we concerned According to the North Carolina Botanical Gardens Biota of North America study at least 4 000 species of non native plants occur outside cultivation in the United States Most of these species cause few problems but 79 species cost the U S economy more than 97 billion annually in lost crops failed recovery efforts for endangered species and control efforts Invasive species have contributed to the decline of 42 of U S endangered and threatened species for 18 of U S endangered or threatened species invasives are the main cause of decline Invasive species compete directly with native species for moisture sunlight nutrients and space Moreover some studies suggest that the fruit produced by invasives may not be as nutritious for local wildlife requiring them to eat more frequently Fruits and seeds of invasive species are the junk food of the natural world Why are invasive species so successful Most species have predators in their natural range that keep their population numbers in check When new species are introduced however they come without their natural predators Most invasive species produce copious amounts of seed This seed is often bird or wind dispersed allowing it to cover great distances in a short period of time Some invasives have aggressive root systems that can spread long distances from a single plant These root systems often grow so densely that they smother the root systems of surrounding vegetation Some species produce chemicals in their leaves or root systems that inhibit the growth of other plants around them Most invasives cast extremely dense shade beneath which native vegetation can not survive Most invasives thrive on disturbed soil such as that around newly developed land or along highways As our region becomes more fragmented through development local habitats become more vulnerable to invasives What can we do about them Many private organizations and government agencies are beginning to look at this very serious environmental problem seeking solutions It appears that areas with intact highly diverse or complex systems are more resistant to invasion and dominance by exotic species so increased protection of areas of

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/conserve/controlling-invasives/index (2016-04-30)
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