archive-org.com » ORG » N » NEWENGLANDWILD.ORG

Total: 106

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Pope Francis urges us to “‘till and keep’ the garden of the world” — New England Wild Flower Society
    of resources across the world should read the document The Pope has added his voice to the chorus of religious leaders who have for quite some time been urging both the faithful and the powerful to fully commit to restoration and stewardship of the earth s resources Although characterized by the media as a document on climate change timed to influence a new round of global climate talks in Paris later this year the 246 paragraph encyclical is a wide ranging call to action to save the planet and the world s poor from the excesses of human consumption Pope Francis argues that the earth herself burdened and laid waste is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor and he repeatedly urges both personal and political action Throughout the text he reminds us all that stewardship of the earth is both a moral issue and one of self preservation as it is quoting Saint Francis of Assisi Mother Earth who sustains us and governs us and who produces various fruit with coloured flowers and herbs The first chapter of the encyclical opens with the common good of climate and the Pope s conviction that a very solid scientific consensus indicates that we are presently witnessing a disturbing warming of the climatic system In the four paragraphs on climate he asserts that climate change is a global problem with grave implications environmental social economic political and for the distribution of goods It represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day He then calls on humanity to recognize the need for changes of lifestyle production and consumption in order to combat this warming or at least the human causes which produce or aggravate it And that last is the real point Whether he is addressing climate change

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/pope-francis-urges-us-to-201c2019till-and-keep2019-the-garden-of-the-world201d.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Poisoned Plants — New England Wild Flower Society
    pesticides can remain in soil for years and travel into water bodies so their toxic effects become more widespread According to research conducted by scientists at the U S Geological Survey and published in the journal Environmental Pollution in 2014 neonics were found in up to 75 percent of surface streams and waterways in an area of high corn and soybean production in the Midwest A study by Dutch scientists published in the esteemed journal Nature in 2014 links high concentrations of a common neonic in surface water to a decline in bird populations that averaged 3 5 percent annually A 2013 study published by the American Bird Conservancy indicates that a single corn kernel or tiny grain of wheat treated with some of the neonics can kill a songbird The advocacy group Friends of the Earth ramped up its campaign to get neonics out of nursery plants after discovering that 51 percent of the bee friendly plants it tested from garden centers across the U S and Canada contained neonics Gardeners are therefore creating pollinator gardens with plants that are killing the very insects they intend to support Other studies indicate that using neonics might be counterproductive for instance treating eastern hemlocks on your property with one of the most common neonics imidacloprid to control the invasive insect hemlock woolly adelgid can lead to secondary pest outbreaks of mites The warning issued last year by Dr Jean Marc Bonmatin a lead author of a study by the Task Force on Systemic Pesticides published in the journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research bears repeating The evidence is very clear We are witnessing a threat to the productivity of our natural and farmed environment equivalent to that posed by organophosphates or DDT Furthermore far from protecting food production the use of

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/poisoned-plants.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Watercolor in the Garden with Carol Govan — New England Wild Flower Society
    your experiences in the field Carol Govan Watercolor Carol Govan a professional artist botanical illustrator and teacher will be leading the course Govan is a graduate of New England Wild Flower Society s Certificate in Native Plant Studies program which has helped her gain insight into the connection between art and nature Her work seen below has been featured by the New England Society of Botanical Artists Duxbury Art Complex

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/watercolor-in-the-garden-with-carol-govan.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Plants and Pollinators: When One is in Trouble, So is the Other — New England Wild Flower Society
    to decline than others What do we mean by vulnerable These are species that have lost many populations over time and or their New England range distributions have disproportionately shrunk relative to their historically documented range Information on their historical population numbers and their ranges come from a wealth of botanical collections amassed in New England herbaria by dozens of botanists since the 1700s We also can compare the number of known plant populations first recorded in the Flora Conservanda in 1996 by Bill Brumback and colleagues to those listed in the Flora Conservanda 2012 update The first study shows that of 71 species we examined that insect pollinated plants have lost significantly more populations and extent of their former range area than plants that can self pollinate or rely on wind to move pollen The latter comparison showed that more than 70 of species showing declines in population numbers between 1996 and 2012 were insect pollinated versus fewer than 20 of wind pollinated species Clearly these are correlative data but they are based on observations of large numbers of species and such signals emerge as quite strong even as plants are affected by a constellation of threats and stressors What does this say about pollinator and plant decline in New England This finding presents a bit of a chicken and egg problem are plants declining because their pollinators are less abundant or are pollinators becoming less abundant in part because their nectar and pollen bearing food plants are becoming less common Only experimental fieldwork can tell us for sure but these patterns point to the urgency of such research and the need to conserve both partners in the pollination dance Plants and their pollinators share a reciprocal relationship mutualism in which each is heavily dependent on the other And

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/plants-and-pollinators-when-one-is-in-trouble-so-is-the-other.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive

  • What’s a Plant To Do? Threats Facing Rare Plants in New England — New England Wild Flower Society
    by rhizomes or other vegetative means Some species are rare not just in New England but throughout their entire range These so called sparse species first identified by Ecologist Deborah Rabinowitz and colleagues in the 1980s tend to have small populations and low reproductive rates but continue to persist just fine in their native habitats For example purple milkweed Asclepias purpurascens is just as sparse in the heart of its prairie range as it is here in New England Other species are rare because they face external threats to their continued existence How do we identify and rank the threats to these species When the Society s intrepid Plant Conservation Volunteers and Task Force members go out in the field to monitor rare plant populations they are asked to identify and list any threats they see impinging on the site they are observing They record their observations on standardized field forms which are turned in to Natural Heritage Programs This data gathering allows us to categorize the stressors that are affecting literally hundreds of plant occurrences We analyzed 840 populations across 81 species of rare plants in order to rank a suite of 23 threats that had been flagged on field forms The top five threats were Succession to a closed canopy which competitively excluded plants such as field and sandplain species adapted for more open conditions Trampling by foot traffic or all terrain vehicles Competition with invasive plant species Conversion of rare plant habitat to housing and other developments Disturbance related to maintaining roads railroads and other rights of way such as power lines In many ways these data quantify the obvious we all know that pavement is bad for plants for example But being able to identify the most pervasive threats across the region enables the Society and

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/what2019s-a-plant-to-do-threats-facing-rare-plants-in-new-england.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Plant Native Plants: Even in Cities — New England Wild Flower Society
    titled Birders The Central Park Effect have painted a clear picture of the importance for green space even in the midst of some of the most populous cities on earth The researchers recorded the density of thousands of plant and animal species reported in cities expressed as number of species per square kilometer Next they assembled lists of the species expected to occur in nearby non urban areas based on published range maps of these taxa They then explored correlations between bird and plant density and 10 factors characterizing each city including its age the proportion of land cover with green space climate geography and topography Interestingly North America contained a high overall number and density of plants and birds associated with cities second only to Indo Malayan countries Perhaps surprisingly cities harbor significant numbers of bird and plant species Twenty percent of globally known bird species and more than 14 000 plant species representing 5 of the earth s flora and 2 3 of all plant families occur in cities The researchers note that cities with more open space parks conservation areas and greenways support higher proportions of the expected bird and plant species However other findings were more sobering cities only support about 25 of the plant species and only 8 of birds that would be predicted to occur there based on their overall urban and non urban ranges On average about 28 of plant species in cities around the globe are exotic to their locales Could it be that birds and other organisms face a lack of native species in cities and therefore tend to give them a miss What if we attracted them by planting more of the native plants on which they depend Reflecting on these data the authors conclude Efforts directed towards conservation and

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/plant-native-plants-even-in-cities.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Plants Get Around — New England Wild Flower Society
    the right tools for promoting their dispersal and finding appropriate habitats on the other side Small seeds from species such as birch can float around on water currents or melting snow Sticky seeded species such as burdock Arctium spp the inspiration for Velcro incidentally can hitch a ride on any human or animal passerby Milkweed Asclepias species seeds loft on wind currents Ecologists have even recently documented the longest plant dispersal event known in the world 11 000 miles from Hawai i to Reunión Island in the Indian Ocean It turns out that long distance dispersal events though statistically very rare may contribute importantly to the movement of entire species to new ranges For years botanists have been puzzling over the apparently too rapid dispersal of plant species following the Pleistocene Pondering in 1905 British botanist Clement Reid could not figure out how plant species crossed the English Channel at the rate of 100 1000 meters per year and his bafflement was appropriately dubbed Reid s Paradox Finally in 1998 statistical ecologist James Clark solved the Paradox by determining that even very low probability dispersal events can explain the northward expansion of tree species following glaciation This is not to say that all members of our New England flora will simply buy one way tickets and survive climate change Following deglaciation some tree species colonized new areas faster than others Oaks Quercus species with their large heavy acorns did not populate Vermont heavily during warming times for example And today there is the significant barrier posed by what I call the I 95 effect named after the interstate highway that runs from Florida to New England the fact that human produced structures and habitat fragmentation will likely block some species from migrating elsewhere if their preferred habitats no longer exist

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/plants-get-around.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Climate Change and the Future of Plant Life symposium: Andy Finton — New England Wild Flower Society
    identifying climate resilient areas that enable species and communities to move or rearrange as climate change alters their habitats Resilience defines the ability of plants animals and entire ecosystems to moderate the impacts of climate change cope with consequences and take advantage of opportunities in short the capacity to adapt Climate resilient areas will provide natural strongholds to conserve biological diversity into the future These sites include well connected habitats with diverse microhabitats which provide species with options to move to more suitable areas during periods of extreme weather associated with climate change Andy will describe the concepts behind resilience the key components of the analysis and how the results are best applied to help retain plant diversity into the future The Nature Conservancy works collaboratively with government agencies NGOs land trusts businesses and local communities to apply innovative science and expertise to catalyze conservation at scale Andy has been a part of these Conservancy efforts for 17 years now His expertise focuses on forest and landscape ecology spatial analyses and protecting landscapes that provide people and nature with a full suite of benefits Currently Andy is working with scientists across the East Coast to define a network of resilient

    Original URL path: http://backstage.newenglandwild.org/blog/climate-change-and-the-future-of-plant-life-symposium-andy-finton.html/ (2016-04-30)
    Open archived version from archive



  •