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  • Millennials Want More Public Transportation | NJPIRG
    less driving Changing Lifestyles Millennials are less interested in owning a car want to live in walkable areas more according to the survey one in three Millennials don t plan on ever moving to the suburbs Facing Higher Hurdles for Youth Driving Graduated drivers licenses which require more time and training to get a full license deter some from getting licenses and colleges are taking steps to limit the amount of cars on campus Adopting New Technologies and Transportation Options New technology has allowed the development of new transportation options like ride share and bike shares among others made it easier to use existing forms of transportation and makes the time spent commuting move valuable by allowing people to stay connected be productive while in transit As a Millennial myself I can relate to many of these reasons above I went to college where I didn t have want or need a car I m not yet married nor do I plan to be for a long while and want to live in walkable areas where I can get to the grocery stores restaurants bars and other attractions without a car But it s the availability of technology has largely enabled me to realize that want a number of apps allow me to find the closest bike share map the fastest bus route home reserve a car or order a ride at the touch of a button The reasons Millennials as a whole are driving less is varied and complicated but as the largest generation they re the ones with the most to gain or lose from a lack of investment in public transportation The decisions we make today are will define how we re able to navigate our cities in the future and it s clear that Millennials want

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/blogs/blog/maf/millennials-want-more-public-transportation (2016-04-29)
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  • How Deadly are Your State’s Roads? | NJPIRG
    on our roadways can t be attributed to speed alone other factors like total miles driven climate and age distribution can effect these rates as well to varying degrees 4 Vision Zero Even in the states with the safest roads hundreds if not thousands of people die annually from motor vehicle crashes and many more are injured In 2013 there were nearly 33 000 fatalities across the U S slightly more than the number of deaths from firearms As mentioned above some cities like New York City Boston Chicago and San Francisco have launched initiatives known as vision zero to eliminate traffic fatalities The basic premise of vision zero is that one death is too many and traffic fatalities aren t inevitable If you agree add your name to our petition to help spread this initiative in cities and states across the country Washington State is currently the only state in the country that has adopted vision zero statewide Since adopting the plan in 2000 Washington has been able to dramatically decrease deaths from a peak of 658 deaths in 2002 5 to 436 in 2013 6 Achieving Zero Deaths Eliminating deaths on our nation s roads requires multiple strategies including education law enforcement vehicle safety and infrastructure Some will occur at the local level including education about safe driving and riding practices and enforcement of traffic laws like DUI penalties and speed limits Vehicle safety has advanced dramatically over the past few decades and will continue to improve Seatbelts air bags blind spot warning back up cameras automatic breaking and adaptive headlights are just a few safety features available in cars today But arguably the most forward thinking aspect of vision zero is how it views infrastructure we should design systems that take into account human fallibility and our systems should share responsibility for crashes i e if we design roads that make crashes more likely we should fix the design Seattle s vision zero plan reflects that view by promoting street designs that emphasize safety predictability and the potential for human error 7 Designing our roadways and cities to reduce deaths often involves reducing speeds so that drivers can see more and if crashes do occur are far less likely to involve serious injury or death As Dr Sivak noted speed is one of the most important factors in fatalities In addition more and better cross walks sidewalks bike lanes and other pedestrian and cycling improvements can reduce the risk of crashes between vehicles and pedestrians or cyclists Given the numbers above some states are clearly safer than others regarding traffic deaths but none have yet eliminated them If you believe more states should be working towards that goal add your name to our petition Road accidents are the second leading cause of injury related deaths in the U S 8 It s time for individual states to set goals to eliminate deaths and serious injury from accidents and to adopt vision zero principles in designing better transportation

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/blogs/blog/usp/how-deadly-are-your-state%E2%80%99s-roads (2016-04-29)
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  • The Innovative Transportation Index | NJPIRG
    is currently available in 32 of 70 cities Static transit data improves usability of transit services by enabling users to access schedules and route maps online via desktop smartphone or other Internet connected devices When accessible on the go schedule and routing data helps riders navigate transit systems effectively even when their plans change Static transit data is currently available in 66 of 70 cities Real time transit information builds on the benefits of open static data by providing users real time information on arrival departure times and delays This gives riders the ability to avoid unforeseen wait times or to change routes at the last minute Real time transit information is currently available in 56 of 70 cities Multi modal apps knit the transportation landscape together by offering users the opportunity to see side by side comparisons of a variety of routes and services for making their trip including biking carsharing public transit driving and walking Multi modal apps are currently available in 47 of 70 cities Virtual ticketing gives users the opportunity to avoid lost tickets and long wait times at the ticket counter by buying tickets directly through an Internet connected device such as a smartphone Riders can set up an account to look after expenses and track ticket validity Virtual ticketing is currently available in 6 of 70 cities This report finds There are at least 19 cities with Abundant Choices places where at least some residents have access to all or nearly all of these new transportation services Austin Texas is the only city in the United States to have access to all 11 kinds of services evaluated here San Francisco and Washington D C have access to 10 of the services evaluated See Table ES 1 Another 35 cities have Growing Choices Residents of these cities have access to many kinds of innovative transportation services but not as many as cities with Abundant Choices Orlando Atlanta Louisville St Louis Baltimore Cleveland Kansas City Newark Pittsburgh and Raleigh lead this category and several are already planning the addition of new technology enabled services within the next year The remaining 16 cities have Emerging Choices these are cities where residents have access to fewer than half of the types of technology enabled services evaluated in this report Many of these are smaller cities in largely rural states with limited transportation options These tools are beginning to expand to new areas and further expansion would signal their potential to benefit a wide variety of American cities Table ES 1 Top Cities with Abundant Choices Technology enabled transportation services have the potential to reduce driving and car ownership especially among young people Studies have shown that tools such as carsharing and ridesharing reduce vehicle ownership and the number of miles driven Other tools such as real time transit information improve the experience of riding transit and have been shown to give a modest boost to ridership Residents in cities that have access to a portfolio of technology enabled

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/reports/njf/innovative-transportation-index (2016-04-29)
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  • New Report Shows Mounting Evidence of Millennials’ Shift Away from Driving | NJPIRG
    central cities to suburbs than at any time since at least the late 1990s Millennials consistently report greater attraction to less driving intensive lifestyles urban living residence in walkable communities and openness to the use of non driving modes of transport than older generations Fewer young people are getting their driver s licenses than even a few years ago The percentage of high school seniors with driver s licenses declined from 85 percent to 73 percent between 1996 and 2010 according to the AAA Foundation for Highway Safety with federal data suggesting that the decline has continued since then Millennials are the largest generation in number and they will be the chief users of the transportation investments that get made over the coming decade Millennials are expected to drive more as they reach the peak driving years of middle age but if they drive less or even no more than their parents did in middle age it will be a monumental shift in travel trends since the 1950s and the assumptions underpinning current transportation policy In New Jersey the current proposal to funnel 32 billion into the Department of Transportation s 2013 2022 Statewide Capital Investment Strategy or SCIS won t make as much sense if the rising generation ends up driving less than forecast In reviewing a wide range of data from the last few years the report finds that many of the reasons why Millennials are driving less are long term trends that are likely to last While young adults living on their parents sofa increased during the recession the share living in their parents homes had also been increasing even prior to the recession The recession may have caused some Millennials to delay forming separate families that would likely drive more but Americans have been getting married and having children at a later age nearly continuously since the 1960s These trends have continued during the recovery Graduated driver licensing requirements adopted in recent years by state governments have likely played a small but important role in causing young people to delay or forgo getting a driver s license potentially encouraging Millennials to develop less car dependent transportation habits that they may carry with them as they age Americans drive fewer total miles than we did in 2005 and fewer miles per capita than we did in the mid 1990s People are riding public transportation more than at any time since the mid 1950s the number of people working at home continues to surge and bicycling has become the fastest growing mode of commuting Demand for housing and office space in walkable neighborhoods of many cities is outpacing the supply of new construction This report is about more than just describing what is taking place said Chowdhury It is also about an opportunity If Millennials continue to drive fewer miles than previous generations as they age and if future generations of young people follow suit America will have an opportunity to reap a variety of benefits including reduced

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/news/njf/new-report-shows-mounting-evidence-millennials%E2%80%99-shift-away-driving (2016-04-29)
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  • Millennials in Motion | NJPIRG
    continued since 2010 Young people are not the only Americans who are driving less The number of miles driven by the average American has declined nearly continuously since 2004 Americans now drive no more in total than we did in 2005 and no more on average than we did at the beginning of President Bill Clinton s second term in office There are many factors at play in the drop in driving among young Americans Many of those factors from high gas prices to tougher driver licensing laws appear likely to last Socioeconomic shifts The Great Recession contributed to unemployment and falling incomes among young people However driving fell among both young people with jobs and those without during the 2000s as well as among young people in households of various income levels demonstrating that the decline in driving was caused by more than just the recession Many of the driving related socioeconomic changes linked to the recession such as the increase in the number of Millennials living in their parents basements were already taking place for years or decades before the recession began suggesting that a return to pre recession patterns is not inevitable as the economy recovers Americans have been getting married later and having children later nearly continuously since the 1960s and have continued to do so during the first years of the recovery While the number of young Americans living with their parents increased sharply during the Recession the share of young people living in their parents homes had been increasing even prior to the recession and household formation among young people has remained slow during the recovery Millennials reaching driving age today have no living memory of consistently cheap gasoline Gasoline prices are projected to remain at historically high levels indefinitely possibly leading Millennials to make long term transportation and housing decisions that require less driving Lifestyle preferences Several studies have found a generational cohort effect among the Millennials that is today s young people drive less than previous generations of young Americans even when economic and other factors linked to vehicle ownership or driving are taken into account Millennials consistently report greater attraction to less driving intensive lifestyles urban living residence in walkable communities and openness to the use of non driving modes of transport than older generations Changing technology and transportation options The past decade has seen a technological revolution with the widespread adoption of the smartphone and social media and more recently the creation of a wide variety of new technology enabled transportation services from bikesharing to real time transit tracking apps Young people have been the first to adopt many of these technologies and tools and have been disproportionately attracted to alternatives such as bikesharing and ridesourcing taxi like services such as Lyft and Uber Many of these technology enabled services are relatively new and are currently in use by only a small percentage of people But some such as bikesharing and round trip carsharing have already been shown to lead

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/reports/njf/millennials-motion (2016-04-29)
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  • Transportation | NJPIRG
    personal vehicles These efforts are working well saving money for universities improving the quality of life in college towns and giving today s students experience in living life without depending on a personal car Read more about A New Course News Release NJPIRG Law Policy Center Transportation University Campuses Like Rutgers Are Transportation Trailblazers as Students Lead Shift From Driving As Millennials lead a national shift away from driving universities like Rutgers are giving students new options for getting around and becoming innovators in transportation policy according to a new report released today The report titled A New Course How Innovative University Programs Are Reducing Driving on Campus and Creating New Models for Transportation Policy was released by NJPIRG Student Chapters today Read more about University Campuses Like Rutgers Are Transportation Trailblazers as Students Lead Shift From Driving News Release NJPIRG Public Health Transportation New Safety Recommendations a Good Step Forward Statement of Jen Kim NJPIRG State Director on new NTSB recommendations for oil transport on trains Read more about New Safety Recommendations a Good Step Forward News Release NJPIRG Law Policy Center Transportation Report Shows Newark NYC Region Driving Less Using Transit and Alternatives More A first of its kind report by the NJPIRG Law Policy Center shows reduced driving miles and rates of car commuting in New Jersey s urbanized areas including the Newark NYC and Philadelphia areas and greater use of public transit and biking Read more about Report Shows Newark NYC Region Driving Less Using Transit and Alternatives More Report NJPIRG Law Policy Center Transportation Transportation in Transition Our first of its kind report shows that Americans transportation habits have changed The average American drives 7 6 percent fewer miles today than when per capita driving peaked in 2004 A review of data from the Federal Highway Administration Federal Transit Administration and Census Bureau for America s 100 most populous urbanized areas which are home to over half of the nation s population shows that the decline in per capita driving has taken place in a wide variety of regions Read more about Transportation in Transition News Release NJPIRG Law Policy Center Transportation New Study Finds Technology Enabling Americans to Drive Less In a first of its kind study NJPIRG Law Policy Center compiled nation wide evidence on transportation apps and vehicle sharing programs such as Zipcar and found that these advanced new tools have made it easier for Americans to drive less Real time apps and on board wi fi for public transit as well as carsharing bikesharing and ridesharing have spread rapidly in recent years The report examines new evidence on how these practices are changing travel behavior Read more about New Study Finds Technology Enabling Americans to Drive Less Report NJPIRG Law Policy Center Transportation A New Way To Go America is in the midst of a technological revolution and a big shift in our transportation habits Over the last 15 years the Internet and mobile communications technologies have transformed the way Americans

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/topics/transportation?page=1 (2016-04-29)
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  • Transportation | NJPIRG
    Dream less dependent on driving Read more about A New Direction News Release NJPIRG Law and Policy Center Transportation New Report Long Term Drop in How Much People Drive Youth Desire More Transportation Options A new report released today by the NJPIRG Law and Policy Center demonstrates that Americans have been driving less since the middle of last decade The report Transportation and the New Generation Why Young People are Driving Less and What it Means for Transportation Policy shows that young people in particular are decreasing the amount they drive and increasing their use of transportation alternatives Read more about New Report Long Term Drop in How Much People Drive Youth Desire More Transportation Options Report NJPIRG Law and Policy Center Transportation Transportation and the New Generation The United States is in the midst of the longest decline in driving since World War II with the greatest reduction in driving occurring among young people Transportation and the New Generation explores the reasons why young people are driving less and the implications for transportation policy in the United States Read more about Transportation and the New Generation Resource Budget Consumer Protection Democracy Financial Reform Food Health Care Higher Ed Safe Energy Solid Waste Tax Transportation Ed s Blog Nuclear Power and the Threat to Drinking Water In the United States 49 million Americans receive their drinking water from surface sources located within 50 miles of an active nuclear power plant Keep Reading about Nuclear Power and the Threat to Drinking Water Media Hit Transportation The Star Ledger Report Gas tax car charges only cover half the cost of road maintenance Amid a debate over whether New Jersey should increase its low gasoline tax to shore up the nearly broke transportation fund a report released today cautions that gas taxes and

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/topics/transportation?page=2 (2016-04-29)
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  • Transportation | NJPIRG
    Where Taxes Subsidize Driving Report NJPIRG Law and Policy Center Budget Transportation Do Roads Pay For Themselves Highway advocates often claim that roads pay for themselves with gasoline taxes and other charges to motorists covering or nearly covering the full cost of highway construction and maintenance They are wrong Read more about Do Roads Pay For Themselves Report NJPIRG Law and Policy Center Transportation Road Work Ahead Over the last 50 years America has built roads and bridges at a pace and scale that dwarfs most of the rest of the world We ve built a national highway network like no other with more than 45 000 miles of interstate highway and 575 000 highway bridges Read more about Road Work Ahead Report NJPIRG Law and Policy Center Democracy Transportation Greasing The Wheels In the wake of the Minnesota I 35 bridge collapse there was enormous public outcry and recognition of the need to repair our crumbling infrastructure Americans expected public officials to respond to the tragedy with a large scale effort to address the nearly 73 000 structurally deficient bridges in this country The findings in this report suggest that did not happen Read more about Greasing The Wheels Report NJPIRG Law and Policy Center Transportation Economic Stimulus or Simply More Misguided Spending This fall Congress asked states to submit lists of ready to go transportation infrastructure projects that could be funded by the stimulus package Lists from nineteen state departments of transportation DOTs show that the broader goals articulated by President elect Obama will be undermined if Congress the Administration and the states do not establish forward looking rules for spending stimulus funds Read more about Economic Stimulus or Simply More Misguided Spending Pages first previous 1 2 3 4 Search form Search About Issues Stop the Overuse

    Original URL path: http://njpirg.org/topics/transportation?page=3 (2016-04-29)
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