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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Women’s Board Historic Furniture - 6/19/14
    The historic furniture is the original furniture that was made for the Women s Board room there are two chairs three benches one chest one cupboard and two tables located throughout the New Mexico Museum of Art It all began when the Women s Board volunteers went to the museum s Collection Manager in hopes of learning how to clean and protect their furniture It was then decided to ask the State Conservator to demonstrate the proper way of conserving furniture A workshop was later scheduled to exhibit the proper procedures of cleaning and waxing the historic pieces We began our cleaning mission by first using a very mild soap with no perfumes dyes or harsh chemicals called Orvus We learned that it is the same soap that is used to clean horses so it could be found at a local feed store Only a small quantity about a quarter teaspoon is needed per quart of water Orvus is very concentrated The furniture needed to be cleaned with a few washes with the soapy water and a cloth that is 50 cotton and 50 polyester The furniture is used in the main lobby of the Museum where the public is welcomed to enjoy them so one can imagine the amount of dirt and grime Let s just say that our white cloths were black in a matter of minutes To our belief the furniture had not been cleaned in many years In the photo below the difference seen between the cleaned and not cleaned is huge After the furniture was cleaned with a minimal amount of wet time a thin coat of wax was applied and then buffed The wax used is a Johnson s paste wax which consists of Carnauba wax Microcrystalline wax Paraffin and Deodorized Napth Johnson s

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/womens-board-historic-furniture.html (2016-02-14)
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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Thanks Dad: Exploring Artistic Lineage - 6/16/14
    and subject matter thus emphasizing the inherent influence that parents have over their offspring Paul Sarkisian s style evolved immensely throughout his artistic career from pure abstraction to more representational imagery For the purposes of this discussion I am going to focus on his more figurative work that can best be described as surreal One series of his involves large scale photorealist paintings that depict monochromatic storefronts One exemplary work from this series is Untitled Santa Barbara These murals are composed of hundreds of photos that were projected onto the panel in the form of a photomontage These large scale pieces are described as being photo realist and so realistic in form that one could almost walk into it believing that it were real However the gray toned monochromatism shatters the illusion as does the obsessive tendency towards realism This mimesis borders on hyperrealism and surrealism because from the straight lines and precise shading the objects become flat abstract and peculiarly out of place It becomes an illusionary trick of the eye Sarkisian also embraced surrealism and illusionary collage with the addition of color in his figurative works This can be seen in the work Untitled Phil Hefferton He is exploring the classical figurative style with an abstract collage aesthetic This style diverges from his photorealist murals because they are not attempting to mimic reality The goal rather is to create an imaginary world full of color with a disregard for gravity and proportion Paul Sarkisian Untitled Phil Hefferton 1967 68 Acrylic on cotton canvas 129 x 116 Paul Sarkisian Untitled Santa Barbara 1970 Acrylic on canvas 110 x 191 Paul s work was innovative for the time however it also recalls historic nudes that are evocative of Western Classicism His son Peter a product of an entirely different time lacks these references and instead incorporates technology into his work His work is both fine art and digital art and is somewhat unclassifiable In contrast to the work of his father his works while not small are not extensive in size In the modest piece Ink Blot a miniature man is escaping from an inkwell His pieces are part sculpture and part digital projection It is difficult for the viewer to differentiate between the two mediums however and thus like his father he is creating an illusion Like Untitled Phil Hefferton it is a fictive world The illusionary aspect of Peter Sarkisian s work is more likened to Untitled Phil Hefferton than Untitled Santa Barbara because it is not attempting to replicate reality Peter s work addresses more social issues than that of Paul Paul s work stems from the imagination with less of the political and social agenda used by Peter In Peter s Registered Driver a projection of video footage of a man driving recklessly throughout the city in the window of a freestanding car door Peter quotes the destructive nature of video games on youth Peter Sarkisian Ink Blot 2011 Power coated steal and aluminum found ink

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/thanks-dad-exploring-artistic-lineage-61614.html (2016-02-14)
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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Patrocino Barela: External Influences on New Mexican Art - 6/10/14
    figure is frozen in time in a moment of sorrow her teardrops hesitate on her palpable flesh as she moves her rosaries to touch her breast with one hand a handkerchief in the other It is a universal action that is involuntary the act of crying and grieving The viewer resonates with the figure through empathy and experiencing its very same pain onself This is the devotional goal integral to Catholic iconography dating from the Middle Ages the viewer is meant to engage with the figure on a spiritual and emotional level and embrace its piety Patrociño Barela Untitled Spiritual Figures Patrociño Barela The Annunciation 1950s Gift of Mrs Ward Lockwood 1969 Private Collection With this breed of devotional art examined the religious work of Barela can be appreciated in a new light Viewed together Our Lady of Hope and Barela s abstract rendering of the Virgin Mary and Angel Gabriel in The Annunciation are similar in iconographical subject matter though antithetical in style The forms of the Virgin and Angel Gabriel in Barela s work are simplified and abstract in form In contrast to the ornate aesthetic of Spanish polychrome sculpture they are stripped of any embellishment specificity and color In another Barela work of spiritual context Untitled Spiritual Figures housed in the NMMA collection the abstraction of the religious sculpture is furthered to the point that the figures are interconnected Absent in both of Barela s works is the narrative and temporal specificity of Spanish polychrome sculpture Barela s denial of such decoration is a sophisticated simplification that lends itself to the evolution of iconographical imagery One doesn t need everything perfectly illustrated in order to resonate with the figures represented and understand their emotions The details in The Annunciation are few but they have specificity the closed

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/patrocino-barela-external-influences-on-new-mexican-art-61014.html (2016-02-14)
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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Blue Towel and Remote - 5/29/14
    artists including Rineke Dijkstra and Sally Mann Coming of age is an infrequent subject in art photography that is gaining momentum in the contemporary scene adding to the rich exploration of young adulthood in other humanities especially film and literature Adolescence is an experience defined by contradiction and uncertainty and in Blue Towel and Remote cannot be defined solely by the subject s undaunted gaze and sophisticated drape of loungewear or by the vestiges of childhood abandon represented in the plush toys in the background By extension adolescence can neither be wholly encapsulated by the nonchalant leisure of the preteen in Sally Mann s 7 in her At Twelve series Figure 2 nor by the awkward glamour of the subject in Rineke Dijkstra s Hilton Head Island S C USA June 24 1992 in her Beach Portraits series Figure 3 Sally Mann Rineke Dijkstra 7 At Twelve series Hilton Head Island S C USA June 24 1992 Beach Portraits series The spirit of adolescence is a universal experience and ever more pronounced in an increasingly visual culture that emphasizes self establishment of identity and public persona while at the same time reinforcing body image conventions that are increasingly sexualized and unrealistic Late 20th century portraits like these of young adults attempting to establish their stakes in the world seem even more significant when considering the rise of mass DIY amateur photography and of a culture of self curating public identity and image via social media platforms Today artificial posing has taken over the norm in photography especially self photography among adolescents in the Web 2 0 era and yet these efforts are neither more nor less comprehensive in delineating how and what it means to come of age And in Blue Towel and Remote the girl s grasping of the

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/ja-mei.html (2016-02-14)
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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Art and Literature in Santa Fe - 5/23/14
    city population 11 176 in 1930 and artists and writers are both creative types with similar interests The artists and writers of early 20th century Santa Fe published their work together banded together politically to affect local legislation particularly in the area of historic preservation and even married each other Two power couples of this era stand out as prime examples of these artist writer connections artist William Penhallow Henderson and his wife poet Alice Corbin Henderson and artist Gerald Cassidy and his wife writer Ina Sizer Cassidy Ina Sizer Cassidy served as the Director of the Federal Writer s Project from 1935 1939 and wrote articles about art and artists for New Mexico Magazine She was also extremely active in the community participating in the New Mexico Association on Indian Affairs the Spanish Colonial Arts Society the Historical Society of New Mexico the Folklore Society of New Mexico and was active in the Daughters of the American Revolution Her husband Gerald Cassidy was one of the first painters from the east to live and work in Santa Fe and two of his works are currently hung in the galleries The Hendersons moved to Santa Fe only a few years after the Cassidys Like Gerald Cassidy William P Henderson was a painter married to a writer who was also active in the perpetuation of New Mexican traditions and customs Alice Corbin published several books on poetry the last of which Brothers of Light The Penitentes of the Southwest was illustrated by her husband William Penhallow Henderson Holy Week in New Mexico Support 33 x 41 in Oil on panel Gift of Mrs Edgar L Rossin 1952 The relationships between artists and writers in Santa Fe are too vast for one blog post to cover entirely If you are interested in

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/art-and-literature-in-santa-fe-52314.html (2016-02-14)
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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Right at the Blinking Light - 5/12/2014
    A cube Pablo You must be kidding Now that I think about it an intense discussion about Cubism Modernism Impressionism techniques philosophy or marketing is one of the ingredients essential to an art colony Art colonies began in the 19th and 20th centuries in villages usually where creative souls interacted with one another The key seems to be interaction In viewing Southwestern Allure The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony I was struck by two paintings by John Sloan an artist who summered in Santa Fe for more than thirty years Sloan s Picnic on the Ridge depicts a group of his friends and their dogs making merry around a campfire Their joy is infectious Their freedom complete John French Sloan Picnic on the Ridge 1920 Oil on canvas 26 x 35 inches Private Collection Los Angeles California For me the painting typifies the camaraderie among the artists who arrived here in the late 19th and early 20th century seeking a locale where they were free to experiment and grow Many of these artists were encouraged to come by artist Robert Henri invited by the Museum s first director Dr Edgar Hewett who wanted to build a museum that would be a nucleus for the growing art colony similar to those in Europe Artist studios were provided in the Palace of the Governors where the museum was first located When the current building opened its doors all artists were allowed to exhibit their work under the museum s open door policy championed by Henri who like Sloan didn t believe in art academies or juries In the second painting The New Homestead Sloan again has painted close friends he and his wife are included at a housewarming at artist Will Shuster s small shack where they re smoking and drinking with one another in other words interacting John French Sloan The New Homestead 1930 Oil on board 24 x 32 inches Courtesy of Gerald Peters Gallery Santa Fe New Mexico and Kraushaar Galleries New York New York Where exactly is the art colony centered now The Museum of Art where most of the artists in this exhibit first found a home will soon celebrate its one hundredth anniversary in its current location But it s not the only museum in town now There are ten art museums in Santa Fe exhibiting a wide variety of art including folk Indian contemporary and Spanish Colonial There are art galleries now galleries galore According to the New Mexico Department of Tourism three hundred galleries are in Santa Fe One hundred fifty galleries and restaurants are on Canyon Road alone Restaurants and coffee shops often exhibit and sell art so they re counted How many artists are here I asked Surely someone in state government got a head count That s impossible to say the state tourism person replied But I can tell you this she said It s estimated that one out of six people are involved in some way in art

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/right-at-the-blinking-light-5122014.html (2016-02-14)
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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Are a print and an image on the screen both photographs? - 4/14/14
    pithy yes no or maybe sometimes to the witty to the downright poetic Here are just a few examples of comments that visitors left Light in front or light in back yes one is printed on a canvas that is made of paper whist the other is printed on a canvas made of glasses and plasmas The only difference is the canvas Was there a lens Turn out the light and what do you see Ask after electricity Anything that permanently records an image is a photograph NO Photograph is an immobile image Image on screen is pixels which change and move The image becomes a photo once printed A print is like the original photo gravure The final modification by developing altering times and solutions of a captured image On screen the image can still be altered and modified Are a person and an image on a screen of a person both people No No as images yes They take different routes A print involves more technical skill whereas anyone can digitally play w a pic If you want to know Google it Yes both photographs but with different timelines to extinction Every time I see your face it reminds me of the places we used to go Now all I ve got is a photograph lyrics to the song Photograph by Ringo Starr The print is a physical object to hold The screen is an electronic illusion Yes they can both be photographs However neither is a work of art if it does not move the heart and spirit of the viewer If you would like to leave your thoughts come to the Photo Lab on the second floor of the museum We have pencils and post it notes for you to write or draw with Stay tuned

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/are-a-print-and-an-image-on-the-screen-both-photographs-4814.html (2016-02-14)
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  • New Mexico Museum of Art - Papa Gus - 4/1/2014
    Baumann was a beloved member of the Santa Fe art colony and this musuem is honored to carry on his legacy His works range from paintings to woodcuts to drawings to his ever popular wooden marionettes In addition to a huge collection of his artwork the museum also has some of Baumann s personal archives Some of the highlights of this collection include the original scripts Baumann wrote for his marionettes to perform and rare books that were illustrated by Baumann The archives can only be viewed in the museum but if you can t come here there are several other resources that you can access to learn more about Baumann s art and life Gustave Baumann Nearer to Art and David Acton s Hand of a Craftsman are two of the most frequently used in the museum library This museum also published two of our own books Gustave Baumann s Southwest and The Hand carved Marionettes of Gustave Baumann Last but not least the New Mexico PBS program Colores is always an excellent source for videos about New Mexico artists Their video Hands of a Craftsman Heart of an Artist can be viewed anytime online for free see all

    Original URL path: http://www.nmartmuseum.org/cypher-space/papa-gus-412014.html (2016-02-14)
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