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  • FidoNet
    1984 and originally consisting only of IBM PCs and compatibles FidoNet now includes such diverse machines as Apple s Ataris Amigas and Unix systems For years FidoNet actually grew faster than Usenet but the advent of cheap Internet access probably means its days are numbered FidoNet s site count has dropped from 38K nodes in 1996 through 15K nodes in 2001 to 10K nodes in late 2003 and most of

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/F/FidoNet.html (2016-02-09)
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  • PDP-10
    machines descendants of the PDP 11 when DEC recognized that the 10 and VAX product lines were competing with each other and decided to concentrate its software development effort on the more profitable VAX The machine was finally dropped from DEC s line in 1983 following the failure of the Jupiter Project at DEC to build a viable new model Some attempts by other companies to market clones came to

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/P/PDP-10.html (2016-02-09)
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  • math-out
    encrusted with mathematical or other formal notation as to be incomprehensible This may be a device for concealing the fact that it is actually content free See also numbers social science number A math out approach to history The next

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/M/math-out.html (2016-02-09)
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  • chase pointers
    graph structure Used esp by programmers in C where explicit pointers are a very common data type This is techspeak but it remains jargon when used of human networks I m chasing pointers Bob said you could tell me who to talk to about See dangling pointer and snap 2 Cambridge pointer chase or pointer hunt The process of going through a core dump sense 1 interactively or on a

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/C/chase-pointers.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Click here for a non frames version

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/frames.html (2016-02-09)
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  • (TM)
    to phrases that the author feels should be recorded for posterity perhaps in future editions of this lexicon Sometimes used ironically as a form of protest against the recent spate of software and algorithm patents and look and feel lawsuits

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/0/TM.html (2016-02-09)
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  • /me
    pose command if you are logged on as Foonly and type me laughs others watching the channel will see Joe Foonly laughs This usage has been carried over to mail and news where the reader is expected to perform the

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/0/me.html (2016-02-09)
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  • but zero looks more like an American football stood on end or the reverse you re probably looking at a modern character display though the dotted zero seems to have originated as an option on IBM 3270 controllers If your zero is slashed but letter O is not you re probably looking at an old style ASCII graphic set descended from the default typewheel on the venerable ASR 33 Teletype Scandinavians for whom Ø is a letter curse this arrangement Interestingly the slashed zero long predates computers Florian Cajori s monumental A History of Mathematical Notations notes that it was used in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries If letter O has a slash across it and the zero does not your display is tuned for a very old convention used at IBM and a few other early mainframe makers Scandinavians curse this arrangement even more because it means two of their letters collide Some Burroughs Unisys equipment displays a zero with a reversed slash Old CDC computers rendered letter O as an unbroken oval and 0 as an oval broken at upper right and lower left And yet another convention common on early line printers left zero unornamented but added

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/0/numeral-zero.html (2016-02-09)
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