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  • bug
    incorrect Indeed the use of bug to mean an industrial defect was already established in Thomas Edison s time and a more specific and rather modern use can be found in an electrical handbook from 1896 Hawkin s New Catechism of Electricity Theo Audel Co which says The term bug is used to a limited extent to designate any fault or trouble in the connections or working of electric apparatus It further notes that the term is said to have originated in quadruplex telegraphy and have been transferred to all electric apparatus The latter observation may explain a common folk etymology of the term that it came from telephone company usage in which bugs in a telephone cable were blamed for noisy lines Though this derivation seems to be mistaken it may well be a distorted memory of a joke first current among telegraph operators more than a century ago Or perhaps not a joke Historians of the field inform us that the term bug was regularly used in the early days of telegraphy to refer to a variety of semi automatic telegraphy keyers that would send a string of dots if you held them down In fact the Vibroplex keyers which were among the most common of this type even had a graphic of a beetle on them and still do While the ability to send repeated dots automatically was very useful for professional morse code operators these were also significantly trickier to use than the older manual keyers and it could take some practice to ensure one didn t introduce extraneous dots into the code by holding the key down a fraction too long In the hands of an inexperienced operator a Vibroplex bug on the line could mean that a lot of garbled Morse would soon be coming your way Further the term bug has long been used among radio technicians to describe a device that converts electromagnetic field variations into acoustic signals It is used to trace radio interference and look for dangerous radio emissions Radio community usage derives from the roach like shape of the first versions used by 19th century physicists The first versions consisted of a coil of wire roach body with the two wire ends sticking out and bent back to nearly touch forming a spark gap roach antennae The bug is to the radio technician what the stethoscope is to the stereotypical medical doctor This sense is almost certainly ancestral to modern use of bug for a covert monitoring device but may also have contributed to the use of bug for the effects of radio interference itself Actually use of bug in the general sense of a disruptive event goes back to Shakespeare Henry VI part III Act V Scene II King Edward So lie thou there Die thou and die our fear For Warwick was a bug that fear d us all In the first edition of Samuel Johnson s dictionary one meaning of bug is A frightful object a

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/bug.html (2016-02-09)
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  • bug-compatible
    badly compromised by a requirement to be compatible with fossil s or misfeature s in other programs or esp previous releases of itself MS DOS 2 0 used as a path separator to be bug compatible with some cretin s

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/bug-compatible.html (2016-02-09)
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  • bug-for-bug compatible
    bug for bug compatible n Same as bug compatible with the additional implication that much tedious effort went into ensuring that each known bug was replicated Prev Up Next bug

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/bug-for-bug-compatible.html (2016-02-09)
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  • bug-of-the-month club
    a time honored mail order marketing technique in the U S A mythical club which users of sendmail 8 the Unix mail daemon belong to this was coined on the Usenet newsgroup comp security unix at a time when sendmail security holes which allowed outside cracker s access to the system were being uncovered at an alarming rate forcing sysadmins to update very often Also more completely fatal security bug

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/bug-of-the-month-club.html (2016-02-09)
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  • bulletproof
    any imaginable exception condition a rare and valued quality Implies that the programmer has thought of all possible errors and added code to protect against each one Thus in some cases this can imply code that is too heavyweight due

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/bulletproof.html (2016-02-09)
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  • bullschildt
    confident but incorrect statement about a programming language This immortalizes a very bad book about C Herbert Schildt s C The Complete Reference One reviewer commented The naive errors in this book would be embarrassing even in a programming assignment

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/bullschildt.html (2016-02-09)
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  • bump
    bump vt Synonym for increment Has the same meaning as C s operator Used esp of counter variables pointers and index dummies in for while and do while loops Prev

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/bump.html (2016-02-09)
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  • burble
    source is truly clueless and ineffectual mere flamers can be competent A term of deep contempt There s some guy on the phone burbling about how he got a DISK FULL error and it s all our comm software s

    Original URL path: http://www.no-copy.org/jargonfile/html/B/burble.html (2016-02-09)
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