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  • Presentations | NRCCTE
    Using ROI National Programs of Study Institute Online Occupational Education in Community Colleges Professional Development for Educators on the Use of Assessment Data Programs of Study A Cross Study Examination Relative Impact of Interventions to Improve Postsecondary Achievement and Retention Rigorous Tests of Student Outcomes in CTE POS Science in CTE Secondary Data Analyses Six Stories About Six States Programs of Study Systematic Reviews of Research Postsecondary Transitions Technical Assistance Academy Green Programs of Study Technical Skill Attainment and Post Program Outcomes of Pennsylvania CTE Graduates Vanguard Practices in CTE Building Career Pathways to Success Dr James R Stone III delivered Building Career Pathways to Success as an intensive workshop at the 2013 AdvancED Wyoming Fall Conference at the Little America Hotel and Resort in Cheyenne WY Read more College and Career Ready for the 21st Century The Critical Role for CTE College and career readiness defines the focus of today s high school While college readiness is generally understood career readiness remains a more elusive concept NRCCTE Director Jim Stone made this keynote address at the Pennsylvania Association of Career and Technical Administrators Summer Leadership Conference in State College PA In the presentation Dr Stone explored the multiple perspectives of academic employability and technical skills that define career readiness and their intersection with college readiness Read more College and Career Readiness Making High School Matter Drawing from recent national and international reports and current research Dr Stone explored in this presentation made at the annual conference of the Iowa Association for Career and Technical Education how CTE can make high school matter to more students and fulfill its necessary role of preparing all young people to become successful participants in our economic system Read more Programs of Study Career Pathways Career Academies Structuring a CCR Solution In this presentation

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/publications-resources/presentations?tid_1=All&page=2 (2016-01-08)
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  • The future of work? | NRCCTE
    2nd 2015 Over the past several months I have shared with you a number of articles about the importance of middle skill occupations For those with an interest in workforce development CTE or college and career readiness it s important to understand the underlying dynamics of the labor market In reading these articles and others it s increasingly clear that economists are questioning our readiness for emerging jobs A recent article in the Wall Street Journal What Clever Robots Mean for Jobs captures the essence of this on going conversation Microsoft co founder Bill Gates speaking in Washington last year said automation threatens all manner of workers from drivers to waiters to nurses I don t think people have that in their mental model he said The article subscription needed if you don t have one here s a summary from the Association of Computing Machinery or try Googling the article title highlights recent research on technology s impact on the destruction and creation of jobs From steam engines to robotic welders and ATMs technology has long displaced humans always creating new often higher skill jobs in its wake But recent advances everything from driverless cars to computers that can read human facial expressions have pushed experts like Mr Brynjolfsson to look anew at the changes automation will bring to the labor force as robots wiggle their way into higher reaches of the workplace I encourage you all to explore this growing body of literature and the debate on the future of work It is in the words of a recently departed cultural icon fascinating Please email me at james stone nrccte org with your thoughts About SREB About James R Stone III NRCCTE Staff Contact Us Jim s Corner Core Issues View All Career Pathways Programs of Study Curriculum

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/about-nrccte/about-james-r-stone-iii/jims-corner/future-work (2016-01-08)
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  • The value of middle-skill credentials | NRCCTE
    that certificates have positive impacts on earnings in both states overall and in cases where there is no impact on earnings certificates may nonetheless lead to increased probability of employment or to other benefits To learn more visit the CAPSEE website to download the paper by Di Xu and Madeline Joy Trimble In Getting Credit for What You Know recently published by The Atlantic Monthly Tamar Jacoby reminds us why middle skill credentials hold so much value for many youth The overwhelming majority of American high school students say they expect to go to college and about 70 percent of graduates end up in a college classroom within two years But for many higher education is the equivalent of the Bermuda Triangle they never come out at least not with diplomas Many students give up in the first year about a quarter of those attending four year schools and half of those who start community college And the attrition continues until graduation day The end result Just 32 percent of Americans 25 and older have four year diplomas and just 10 percent have associate s degrees Meanwhile nearly a fourth of the country s workforce more than 36 million adults fall into the category some college no degree Jacoby goes on to describe how Daniel Gamez a 40 something former construction worker who found himself sidelined by an injury and changes in the industry discovered an IT networking course at a local training center It required just 300 hours over six months a little over 12 hours a week Gamez could live at home and work part time The cost was 3 200 a fraction of what he d pay at college But most importantly he was certain the training would lead to a job He could even forecast his

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/about-nrccte/about-james-r-stone-iii/jims-corner/value-middle-skill-credentials (2016-01-08)
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  • The middle-skills gap: Looming or present crisis? | NRCCTE
    About the NRCCTE at SREB Jim s Corner The middle skills gap The middle skills gap Looming or present crisis Jan 27th 2015 I hope this short note finds you doing well The discussion of the skills shortage and especially the challenge of addressing the growing middle skills gap i e the sub baccalaureate labor market continues A recent article in the Harvard Business Review Who Can Fix the Middle Skills Gap makes important observations about this gap First the skills landscape has changed for example employers have expressed a greater need for technical and behavioral skills like problem solving skills and the ability to work well on a team Further an important source of training apprenticeships has declined by more than one third in recent years Thomas Kochan David Finegold and Paul Osterman analyze the middle skills gap and offer possible solutions in the article I encourage you to read it and share your thoughts with me at james stone nrccte org Best About SREB About James R Stone III NRCCTE Staff Contact Us Jim s Corner Core Issues View All Career Pathways Programs of Study Curriculum Integration Retention Completion Accountability Assessment Newsletter Signup Get the latest NRCCTE updates

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/about-nrccte/about-james-r-stone-iii/jims-corner/middle-skills-gap-looming-or-present-crisis (2016-01-08)
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  • Moving to high-quality CTE | NRCCTE
    baccalaureate degree jobs that pay well Just this week the USAToday reported on Where the jobs are The new blue collar Career and technical education CTE is the starting point for these and other occupations But not all CTE we find in today s public schools provides the proper beginning of a career pathway a pathway that builds on credentials business and industry recognize and value What is needed is a revisioning of CTE to meet the more challenging demands of providing students with the skills they need to move through a viable career pathway and continue their education and training to make that pathway a reality What is needed is high quality CTE Numerous organizations have explicitly or implicitly laid out their vision of what high quality CTE should look like I have shared some of these with you in the past The newest entrant to engage this conversation is the AFT American Federation of Teachers This month s publication of the American Educator includes articles from a number of scholars and practitioners adding their voices to this important conversation As the lead author notes In recent years a well intentioned push for all students to earn four year degrees has resulted in limiting rather than expanding educational opportunities A strictly academic curriculum has been prioritized to the detriment of career and technical education CTE which provides the link between the needs of the labor market and the needs of young people to be prepared for life after high school Because of its potential to engage students CTE is now experiencing renewed interest as a viable option for students both career and college bound I encourage you to check out the articles As always I enjoy hearing from you please email me at nrccte nrccte org if you d

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/about-nrccte/about-james-r-stone-iii/jims-corner/moving-high-quality-cte (2016-01-08)
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  • The STEM Worker Shortage: The Debate Continues... | NRCCTE
    Worker Shortage The Debate Continues Aug 4th 2014 Dear Colleagues There have been a couple of recurrent themes in research and news reports over the past few months One important theme is the need for STEM workers This is important for many reasons but not the least of which is that assumptions about labor market needs are driving much of the conversation surrounding school reform and improvement Recently I shared two conflicting reports on the real or imagined STEM worker shortage The discussion continues USA Today in its July 28 2014 edition carried the following subheading Silicon Valley has created an imaginary staffing shortage Business executives and politicians endlessly complain that there is a shortage of qualified Americans and that the U S must admit more high skilled guest workers to fill jobs in STEM fields science technology engineering and math This claim is echoed by everyone from President Obama and Rupert Murdoch to Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates Yet within the past month two odd things occurred The Census reported that only one in four STEM degree holders is in a STEM job and Microsoft announced plans to downsize its workforce by 18 000 jobs Even so the House is considering legislation that like the Senate immigration bill before it would increase to unprecedented levels the supply of high skill guest workers and automatic green cards to foreign STEM students The authors who self identify as longtime researchers of the STEM workforce and immigration argue that they have been unable to find any credible evidence to support the IT industry s assertions of labor shortages Stay tuned the debate continues Read more here Regards About SREB About James R Stone III NRCCTE Staff Contact Us Jim s Corner Core Issues View All Career Pathways Programs of Study Curriculum Integration

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/about-nrccte/about-james-r-stone-iii/jims-corner/stem-worker-shortage-debate-continues (2016-01-08)
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  • Jim's Corner | NRCCTE
    commentaries on CTE related issues have addressed such topics as national and international CTE practices workforce development the labor market and changing global economy the role and impact of technology and the perils and pitfalls of the college for all approach to education Want to receive updates on his latest entries Join our mailing list through the link on the right hand side of this page Even the GAO Can t Figure Out if There s a STEM Worker Shortage STEM is on the lips of everyone these days especially those talking about education reform But defining what constitutes a STEM occupation has always been a bit tricky and the following article shows it is as difficult to determine if there is a STEM worker shortage Read more Defining Secondary CTE Students How does one define a high school CTE student Read more Understanding Participation in 21st Century Secondary CTE Colleagues Read more CTE for the 21st Century Colleagues Read more How to make math not boring A recent editorial in the New York Times points out what many educators have often observed American students are bored by math science and engineering Read more Previous 3 of 11 Next About

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/about-nrccte/about-james-r-stone-iii/jims-corner?page=2 (2016-01-08)
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  • Hospitality and Tourism - 2 | NRCCTE
    Map Hospitality and Tourism 3 This sample Math in CTE curriculum map was created by teacher teams composed of hospitality and tourism Culinary ProStart and math teachers from Utah The associated sample lesson plan and related materials were identified and developed from this curriculum map Click on the linked CTE and math concepts within this map to view the lesson plan associated with them Scroll to the right to view the middle and high school Common Core math standards associated with each unit Hospitality and Tourism 2 hosp prost map 02 pdf CTE Course Unit CTE Concepts or Applications Embedded Math Concepts Middle School Common Core Math Standards High School Common Core Math Standards Using standardized recipes Mathematical operators Fractions Decimals Percentages Figuring conversions Metric Measurements Converting recipes Increasing and decreasing recipes Measuring by volume and weight Addition Subtraction Multiplication Division Adding and subtracting fractions Converting decimals to fractions Percent Converting metric to standard Multiplying and dividing fractions 6 NS 2 6 NS 3 7 NS 1 7 EE 3 6 NS 1 6 EE 2 7 NS 2 7 NS 3 6 NS 5 7 NS 2 7 NS 3 6 RP 2 6 RP 3 7 EE 2 A APR 1 A APR 7 N RN 3 N Q 1 Using standardized recipes Edible Portion EP vs As Purchased Calculating yields Portion sizes Costing recipes Figuring the yield of produce and meat servings for purchasing Figure yield for portion size Cost per serving Menu pricing Addition Subtraction Multiplication Division Adding and subtracting fractions Converting decimals to fractions Percent Converting metric to standard Multiplying and dividing fractions 6 NS 2 6 NS 3 7 NS 1 7 EE 3 6 NS 1 6 EE 2 7 NS 2 7 NS 3 6 NS 5 7 NS 2 7 NS

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/curriculum-maps/hospitality-and-tourism-2 (2016-01-08)
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