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  • Curriculum Integration In Context: An Exploration Of How Structures And Circumstances Affect Design and Implementation | NRCCTE
    always leadership rested in the hands of the original driver or catalyst Year 1 findings also suggested that the original working definition was overly broad which caused the NIWL team to rethink and more clearly define its notion of curriculum integration For the second phase of the study curriculum integration was defined as a series of conscious and informed strategies used to connect academic and vocational content so that one becomes a platform for instruction in the other over an extended period of time For the second phase the team revised its site selection criteria and set out to identify three additional curriculum integration models that met the requirements outlined in the new definition Findings Based on findings from this study it is clear that the presence or lack of certain contextual factors related to structure and operations has considerable implications for the shape scope and quality of curriculum integration The context affects the nature of barriers or challenges school staff face in developing and implementing new content or instructional strategies which has a direct bearing on outcomes Specifically Curriculum integration appears to become more difficult in settings that are focused on multiple occupational areas as opposed to a single industry theme or pathway Curriculum integration appears to be more effective when both academic and vocational instruction occur at the same site Practitioners seem to have considerable difficulty in supporting curriculum integration when students receive regular academic instruction in one location and vocational instruction at another location Curriculum integration is a particular challenge for vocational high schools career programs and regional tech centers that offer career and technical education to students from multiple high schools or districts The presence of leadership at all levels district building and classroom contributes to developing implementing and sustaining successful curriculum integration efforts In order for curriculum integration efforts to be effective individuals in leadership roles must be innovative adaptable and willing to take risks with instruction the content of curriculum and classroom management An investment of resources is needed to develop support sustain and expand curriculum integration efforts While financial resources are necessary to cover the costs of curriculum development staff training and equipment most of the sites visited for this study also relied heavily on in kind contributions of materials facilities time guidance from advisory groups and political support from key stakeholder groups in the community In addition to documenting the circumstances and structural components that facilitate the effective integration of academic and vocational education at the secondary level the NIWL team identified a number of lessons for both researchers and practitioners These include observations related to the role of the catalyst versus the role of leaders the need for flexibility the impacts on teachers and teaching the importance of careful consideration to fit when selecting areas to integrate and the structural support potentially provided by smaller learning communities Perhaps most important of all the study helped to debunk some of the more pervasive myths that surround curriculum integration and began to build

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/publications/curriculum-integration-context-exploration-how-structures-and-circumstances (2016-01-08)
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  • Career Development Interventions and Academic Self-Efficacy and Motivation: A Pilot Study | NRCCTE
    Gitelman Naomi Mandsager and Meng Yin Chen Oregon State University Edwin L Herr The Pennsylvania State University Abstract In the Foreword to his education plan for the nation No Child Left Behind President George W Bush noted two student sentiments as key causes of academic failure These sentiments were low expectations and self doubt This pilot study examines the relationship between participation in career development interventions and the inverse of these sentiments academic motivation and academic self efficacy A nationwide sample of 293 youth from 20 high schools was assessed on a variety of variables including academic motivation academic self efficacy and participation in 44 clearly defined career development interventions Consistent with previous research this pilot study found little or no predictive relationships between level of participation in the interventions and academic motivation or self efficacy However unlike previous studies the specific dosage of each of the 44 interventions was assessed This assessment revealed very low dosage rates across all interventions and all students The implications of this pilot study for an evidence based research agenda concerning career development interventions was discussed Dykeman C Wood C Ingram M Gitelman A Mandsager N Herr E L et al 2003 Career development

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/publications/career-development-interventions-and-academic-self-efficacy-and-motivation (2016-01-08)
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  • Attributes and Characteristics of Exemplary, Leading, and Innovative Career And Technical Education Teacher Preparation Programs | NRCCTE
    and the directors of the Research and Dissemination Centers for CTE supplied the nominees for this panel These individuals were selected because of their decades of knowledge of CTE teacher preparation programs and most importantly they had an excellent knowledge of those individuals across the country who could effectively contribute to the expertise needed in the Delphi The expert Delphi panel also nominated the five following institutions as having distinguished ELI programs University of Minnesota 11 University of Georgia 10 The Ohio State University 10 The Pennsylvania State University 9 and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 7 Researchers conducted a site visit to each institution using the 13 critical attributes as the basis for structured interview protocols A case study approach suggested by Yin 1994 and Mulenga 2001 was used To triangulate data three different protocols were developed faculty elite administrative and focus group More Site visits were conducted so the researchers could collect the data personally The site visits allowed the researchers to see the facilities meet the educators and discuss the attributes in depth These site visits revealed the common areas among the five top rated institutions The ELI institutions were often among those mentioned as the most wired colleges regarding technology Not only do institutional policies regarding computer support play a critical role in technology integration the faculty s willingness to adopt technology was also an important factor Both students and faculty mentioned the rigor of their field experiences and its important role in professional development At ELI institutions teacher preparation was connected to classroom practice and the coursework had a congruent well planned sequence Faculty members were active high profile local and national researchers and authors Exemplary faculty had a holistic view of their students and were concerned about the students family lives in addition

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/publications/attributes-and-characteristics-exemplary-leading-and-innovative-career-and (2016-01-08)
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  • Transition from High School to College and Work for Tech Prep Participants In Eight Selected Consortia | NRCCTE
    required Admittedly these results are very difficult to disentangle from other factors that influence students educational experiences largely because many of the consortia were located in states that had raised high school graduation requirements during the 1990s when this longitudinal study was undertaken Even so it is likely that establishing high school graduation requirements for tech prep core curricula that are associated with collegiate requirements has a positive influence on academic course taking for tech prep participants This finding suggests that it is incumbent upon school personnel to link tech prep core curricula to high school graduation requirements that go beyond the basic minimum requirements and ready students for college entrance In consortia where the linkage between tech prep requirements and advanced academic requirements did not occur tech prep students were less likely to move into more advanced academic curricula than tech prep participants in consortia where this requirement occurred In a related finding a few consortia showed that tech prep participants need not be disadvantaged in fulfilling a college prep program of study if participating in intensive CTE course taking Looking at academic course taking amount and level in greater depth four consortia showed group differences in the amount of high school math courses taken with tech prep participants in one site taking more semesters than non participants but non participants exceeding tech prep participants in the other three In examining the level of math course taking however we found tech prep participants taking slightly more advanced math courses over their high school careers than their non participant peers in four consortia In one noteworthy case tech prep participants started math at a lower level 45 in basic math and finished at a higher level 87 in Algebra II or higher than the non participant group Group differences were also evident in the amount of science courses taken in seven consortia Specifically non participants exceeded tech prep participants in the total semesters of science taken in five consortia but in two sites one consortium and one high school within a consortium tech prep participants took more science than non participants Most students in both study groups were taking mostly regular science e g biology chemistry In a few consortia tech prep participants were taking more lower level science courses than nonparticipants but in most consortia the differences between groups was related to differences in the proportion of students taking regular regular honors and physics courses all of which are well beyond a basic level Looking at career technical course taking tech prep participants were much more likely to be vocational concentrators than non participants as evidenced by 61 of all tech prep participants and 36 of non participants meeting this vocational classification in five sites Vocational concentrators take three or more Carnegie units in one career path or CTE cluster area Specialization in one career area beyond the concentration level referred to as vocational specializer having four or more Carnegie units in a particular CTE area was observed less frequently but it was apparent in five sites In one of these tech prep participants were nearly as likely to be vocational specializers as concentrators indicating these students were amassing a substantial amount of knowledge and skills pertaining to a particular vocational specialization Career technical education CTE course taking was enhanced by the tech prep model in most sites if judged by the level of secondary enrollment in CTE courses including CTE courses articulated with a local college Several forms of work based learning such as co op and job shadowing were prominent among tech prep participants suggesting students who engaged in tech prep were more likely to be involved in intensive learning experiences related to careers both in the classroom and off campus An association was also found between tech prep sites and service learning community service indicating greater involvement among nonparticipants Work during high school was prevalent for both groups suggesting that students begin juggling school work and personal commitments very early in their educational lives Articulated course taking occurred in CTE areas with the most prevalent vocational areas being business mechanics repair and precision production in five consortia Articulated coursetaking was substantial for tech prep participants in these five sites ranging from 65 to 91 for tech prep participants and 31 to 76 for non participants In four of these sites participants in tech prep were more likely to take articulated courses than non participants Among all students who took articulated courses tech prep participants took significantly more semesters on average than non participants Differences between the study groups in the incidence of participation in college prep was evident in five consortia Non participants were more likely be designated college prep than members of the tech prep group in four of the sites Relationships were found between tech prep status and college prep and vocational status in five sites In most of these a greater likelihood of vocational concentration was evident if students either tech prep or non tech prep were not college prep However three consortia showed no association among these variables suggesting tech prep participants who were vocational concentrators were no more or less likely to be college prep students than non participants Recognizing that many students selected for this study are labeled non college bound the proportion of students in each group that went on to college at the 2 year and 4 year college levels is astounding Indeed the percentage of students attending college at the 2 year level was quite high with over 80 of the tech prep participants in six consortia and close to that percentage or higher for the non participant group in five consortia Enrollment of tech prep participants exceeded non participants in seven consortia but the difference between groups was usually small with a significant difference evident in only two sites Results confirm earlier findings of Boesel and Fredland 1999 and others suggesting that college for all is more than a catchy phrase Tech prep participants show a

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/publications/transition-high-school-college-and-work-tech-prep-participants-eight-selected (2016-01-08)
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  • Internet Integration in High Schools: Patterns, Opportunities, and Barriers | NRCCTE
    for in depth study based on the following criteria a mix of urban suburban and rural schools located in different geographic areas a range of student demographic characteristics Internet use in the school for at least 2 years and across the curriculum comprehensive curriculum including career and technical education programs and accessibility within project resources The multifaceted search process used to select the schools included examination of Web 66 a Web site that registers Web sites of schools solicitation of nominations from site directors of the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education and individuals involved in state and national level efforts regarding technology in schools and recommendations from a consultant Data were collected in two phases In the first phase survey questionnaires were provided to all professional staff and students at each school Survey data were collected from 322 teachers 19 administrators 19 counselors 7 technology coordinators and 3 822 students in the five schools African American and Asian students were equally represented and together made up 30 of the student respondents Hispanic students accounted for 10 Caucasian students for 43 and other groups for the remaining 16 In the second phase 219 on site interviews with school professional staff and students were conducted the schools were observed by investigators and school documents were obtained The Five Schools Midwest Inner City Located in a midwestern city this new comprehensive high school was in its 4th year of operation It had been designed to be a high technology career academy for students across the school district who were interested in technology and the career focused curriculum it offered but instead had come to serve a more general inner city student population in its own neighborhood Computers and other technology were widely available throughout the school The school s physical and curricular design centered around smaller groupings of students within the larger school Students representing minority groups constituted 78 of the student body Many of the school s students were from immigrant families new to the United States and for whom English was a second language Two thirds of the student body was eligible for free or reducedprice lunch West Coast Inner City In addition to being a comprehensive high school this West Coast inner city school provided an industrial education magnet program for its school district The school had recently received a state grant to boost its technology and was purchasing computers and auxiliary equipment It had recently upgraded its infrastructure with a special local bond measure It was an active participant in technology focused efforts initiated by its school district Students representing minority groups made up 80 of the student body Many students were from immigrant families new to the United States and for whom English was a second language Three fourths of the students were eligible to receive free or reduced price lunch Midwest Rural A small consolidated school located adjacent to a village in a Midwestern agricultural area this high school was part of a pre

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/publications/internet-integration-high-schools-patterns-opportunities-and-barriers (2016-01-08)
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  • Research Reports | NRCCTE
    Framework Crosswalk Validation Project Inventory of Technical Skills Assessments Literacy in CTE Longitudinal Study of the Personal Pathways to Success Initiative Math in CTE Mature Programs of Study Measuring CTE Effectiveness Using ROI National Programs of Study Institute Online Occupational Education in Community Colleges Professional Development for Educators on the Use of Assessment Data Programs of Study A Cross Study Examination Relative Impact of Interventions to Improve Postsecondary Achievement and Retention Rigorous Tests of Student Outcomes in CTE POS Science in CTE Secondary Data Analyses Six Stories About Six States Programs of Study Systematic Reviews of Research Postsecondary Transitions Technical Assistance Academy Green Programs of Study Technical Skill Attainment and Post Program Outcomes of Pennsylvania CTE Graduates Vanguard Practices in CTE Needs Feedback and The Future Need Sensing Activities in 2001 In 2001 the two National Centers for Career and Technical Education conducted need sensing concerning the general needs of the field dissemination activities and major forces in the environment judged likely to influence education in the foreseeable future The need sensing took place with networks developed in regions assigned to the five primary partner institutions with the National Centers Advisory Council with key state leaders by monitoring discussions on CAREERTECH the primary listserv of the two centers and through review of pertinent literature Read more Helping Disadvantaged Youth Succeed in School Second Year Findings from a Longitudinal Study of CTE Based Whole School Reforms This report provides second year findings from a 5 year longitudinal study The study examines diverse and promising programs for integrating career and technical education CTE previously called vocational education with whole school reforms in schools that serve predominantly disadvantaged students We define disadvantaged students as those living in poverty indexed by participation in the federal free and reduced price lunch program and those who are members of groups that have been historically discriminated against in U S society African Americans Hispanics and immigrants groups for whom English is not their native language This interim report begins the process of providing longitudinal descriptions of CTE enhanced whole school reforms that appear to have strong track records of improving the educational chances of concentrated groups of highly disadvantaged students Read more The Virtual Teacher Training Center A One Year Program to Transform Subject Matter Experts into Licensed Career and Technical Education Teachers The Virtual Teacher Training Center proposed within this paper relies on two major foundations a flexible dynamic re configurable teacher education program of 27 33 credits that can be completed within 1 academic year and is designed to train persons with industry and field experience into educated and licensed CTE teachers The second major foundation of the proposed program is the usage of Internet technology to deliver the program to potential teachers in their homes and communities while they continue engaging in practical experience and student teaching near their homes with cooperating or master teachers Read more The Future of Career and Technical Education in a Continuous Innovation Society This essay will argue that

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/publications-resources/research-reports?tid_1=All&page=14 (2016-01-08)
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  • Role of Workforce Education in Economic Development | NRCCTE
    Impact Reports Brochures Journal Magazine Articles The Idea Center Videos Podcasts Webinars Presentations About the NRCCTE at SREB About SREB About James R Stone III NRCCTE Staff Contact Us Jim s Corner Role of Workforce Education in Economic Development You are here Home Publications Resources Videos Role of Workforce Role of Workforce Education in Economic Development Jun 2005 Panel Discussion Presenters Gregg Christensen Nebraska Department of Education Richard Katt Nebraska Department of Education Larry Scherer Nebraska s Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education Dennis Tyson Central Community College Grand Island NE Abstract This webcast describes the role of workforce education in economic development Panelists include four officials from the State of Nebraska who discussed how their agencies education institutions and employers are working together to ensure economic growth and that there are workers with the skills needed for that economic growth Read the Transcript Research Reports Impact Reports Brochures Journal Magazine Articles The Idea Center Videos Podcasts Webinars Presentations Core Issues View All Career Pathways Programs of Study Curriculum Integration Retention Completion Accountability Assessment Core Issues Career Pathways Programs of Study Curriculum Integration Dual Enrollment Retention Completion Accountability Assessment Career Guidance Counseling Industry Recognized Credentials Professional Development Teaching to Lead Math

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/videos/role-workforce-education-economic-development (2016-01-08)
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  • Business/Education Partnerships Through Career and Technical Education | NRCCTE
    Research Reports Impact Reports Brochures Journal Magazine Articles The Idea Center Videos Podcasts Webinars Presentations About the NRCCTE at SREB About SREB About James R Stone III NRCCTE Staff Contact Us Jim s Corner Business Education Partnerships Through Career and Technical Education You are here Home Publications Resources Videos Business Education Partnerships Through Business Education Partnerships Through Career and Technical Education May 2005 Panelists Tim Lawrence SkillsUSA Noemi Castro Miramar College San Diego CA Larry Cummings Automotive Youth Educational Systems AYES Gary L Hannah Computing Technology Industry Association CompTIA Patrick Murphy North American Technician Excellence NATE Abstract The purpose of this webcast is to provide information on ways business and industry can partner with career and technical education programs Panelists discuss what industry partners expect of schools and postsecondary institutions and what schools and institutions expect of industry partners Read the Transcript Research Reports Impact Reports Brochures Journal Magazine Articles The Idea Center Videos Podcasts Webinars Presentations Core Issues View All Career Pathways Programs of Study Curriculum Integration Retention Completion Accountability Assessment Core Issues Career Pathways Programs of Study Curriculum Integration Dual Enrollment Retention Completion Accountability Assessment Career Guidance Counseling Industry Recognized Credentials Professional Development Teaching to Lead Math in

    Original URL path: http://www.nrccte.org/resources/videos/businesseducation-partnerships-through-career-and-technical-education (2016-01-08)
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