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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Just 4 Fun Raffle Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge was originally established as two separate areas having different names and different jurisdictions The original Sheldon National antelope Refuge was established in 1931 and contained just over 34 000 acres The Charles Sheldon Antelope Range or Game Range was established in 1936 and comprised over 540 000 acres and the two areas were combined to form what is now the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge comprising over 575 000 acres under the sole administration of the Fish and Wildlife Service The special mission of refuges is to provide preserve restore and manage a national network of lands and waters sufficient in size diversity and location to meet society s needs for areas where the widest possible spectrum of benefits associated with wildlife and wild lands is enhanced and made available That broad mission statement has been translated into a more specific Refuge objective for Sheldon namely to manage the Refuge as a representative area of high desert habitat for optimum populations of native plants and wildlife The Refuge is primarily high semi desert country typical of the Great Basin characterized by large tablelands and rolling hills Surface water supplies are severely limited Annual precipitation averages less than 13 inches in the western portions of the Refuge and decreases to six inches in the easterly parts These areas are interrupted by narrow valleys and canyons bordered by precipitous rocky rims Elevations range from 4 500 to 7 600 feet above sea level Vegetation is dominated by communities of big sagebrush low sagebrush and rabbitbrush and bitterbrush Meadow vegetation grasses and forbs and riparian vegetation aspens and willows are limited to areas around the few water sources found on the Refuge Mountain mahogany and western juniper stands are found on higher

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/sheldon-refuge.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge was once home to thousands of migrating birds and northern Paiute Indians The Stillwater marshes were being diverted by twentieth century agriculture drying them out and threatening wetland life The water flow stopped about 100 years ago when dams and reservoirs were built to store the river s water for agricultural uses The marsh resembles its wet historic past when tens of thousands of water birds were seasonal or permanent inhabitants only when precipitation approaches record highs In 1990 however landmark federal legislation was enacted that for the first time provides a way for Stillwater NWR to protect and stabilize its wetlands The legislation allows the refuge to purchase water rights that were attached to the land sold for agricultural use An environmental impact process is under way in which the refuge will choose the most acceptable plan for purchasing the rights to the water it needs The water of the unfettered Carson River used to end up in the Stillwater Marsh as well as in Carson Lake and Carson Sink all slight depressions in the expansive Carson Desert that is without outlets to the sea The desert is the bottom of historic glacially created 300 foot deep Lake Lahontan Even though the Carson and five other rivers flowed into the huge lake excessive

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/stillwater.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Parks Cave Lake Red Rock Biking Trail Visiting Hoover Dam Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Mt Charleston Kyle Canyon Las Vegas Springs Preserve Floyd Lamb Park Tule Springs Place of Interests Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Anaho National Wildlife Refuge The Anaho National Wildlife Refuge NWR is an island in Pyramid Lake located in the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation The area can be reached by Highway 445 from Sparks or Highway 447 from Wadsworth The Anaho Island NWR is closed to public entry to protect wildlife Pyramid Lake was named by John C Fremont in January of 1844 for the very remarkable rock in the lake which attracted our attention for many

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/anaho.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    48 contiguous states One key management objective is providing protection for the desert bighorn sheep The range include six major mountain ranges the highest rising from 2 500 foot valleys to nearly 10 000 feet Annual rainfall ranges from less than four inches on the valley floors to over fifteen inches on the highest peaks Of the six mountain ranges the Sheep Range is the highest most scenic and supports the greatest diversity of wildlife and vegetation The US Fish and Wildlife Server US FWS works to actively improve bighorn habitats by developing new water sources and maintaining and improving existing ones Dependable year round water sources located throughout bighorn habitat enable bighorns to use all available habitat which reduces competition for food cover water and space Numerous other wildlife species share the range with the bighorns Mule deer coyotes badgers bobcats foxes and an occasional mountain lion are the larger mammals Over 260 species of birds have been identified on the range Examples are phainopepla roadrunner pinyon jay house finch loggerhead shrike red tailed hawk and golden eagle Mormon Well Road Truck Tour The most travel route the Mormon Well Road is suitable for four wheel drive or high clearance two wheel drive vehicles This road shown on the map below starts from Highway 95 and terminates on Highway 93 near State Route 168 Typical travel time from Las Vegas is about four hours total Some of the points of interest along this drive are listed below Corn Creek Field Station Described above the Corn Creek Field Station is the starting point of the Mormon Well Road truck tour when driven from Highway 95 Sheep Mountain Range Visible on the left during most of the drive the Sheep Mountain Range is excellent bighorn habitat Desert bighorn often visit this area during the cooler part of the year from late fall to early spring During the hot months they move northward and closer to perennial springs Agave Roasting Pit Roasting pits were used by ancient peoples for slow cooking meats and vegetables Native food such as agave was placed in a bed of hot coals mixed with limestone cobbles and covered with vegetable material and or earth This cooking method was utilized by pre historic Native American people including the Southern Paiute Shoshone and Virgin Branch Anasazi Peek A Boo Canyon For long periods in early geological time Southern Nevada was submerged under a shallow sea It was during this period that the materials that now form the north south mountain ranges on the Wildlife Refuge accumulated in rock layers Folding from earthquakes or movement of the Pacific Plate lifted the deposited layers to form the mountains Erosion has worn off the tops of the folds exposing the colorful rock layers and patterns of the present landscape The steep and generally bare mountain sides are cut by deep ravines and canyons Yucca Forest Yucca Forest with Sheep Range in the background Along much of the drive there is a large

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/desert-national.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Red Rock Canyon NCA Visitor Center and Spring Mountain Ranch State Park Water from streams springs or potholes may not be safe for drinking unless it is boiled filtered or chemically treated Water could be contaminated with Giardia cysts or other parasites Many persons claim they drink untreated water with no ill effects but the time effort and personal expense that you have invested in planning a trip to Red Rock Canyon should not be wasted due to preventable waterborne illness Safety For safety hikers and rock climbers should be properly equipped and have knowledge of the area Hikers climbers and campers should have sufficient water food clothing and equipment for the planned activity A check of local weather is also advised Leave word with someone where you are going and when you plan to return Search and Rescue Emergency services are provided by the Bureau of Land Management and Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department In the event of an accident contact the Red Rock Canyon Visitor Center between 9 a m and 4 p m daily After 4 p m a phone call to the number listed below will initiate a response Pay telephones can be found outside the Visitor Center and in Blue Diamond six miles south of the scenic loop exit and in Las Vegas Cultural Resources Cultural Resources The Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area provides scenic and recreational opportunities for hundreds of people each day Modern visitors are drawn to the Red Rock area for the recreational change of pace and beautiful scenery it has to offer But the Red Rock area has been utilized to meet man s needs for thousand of years It is an area rich in cultural resources Cultural resources are anything that man has used made or altered These resources tell a story of prehistoric Americans in a desert land Over the thousands of human activity in southern Nevada as many as six different Native American cultures may have used the Red Rock area Why Were They Here The key to the area s prehistory is water In the desert areas surrounding Red Rock Canyon and the Spring Mountains water is scarce However the Red Rock Canyon area contains over 40 springs as well as many natural catchment basins known as tanks or tinajas With the presence of dependable water plant and animal life is richer and more concentrated than in the surrounding desert The abundance of plant and animal food sources made the Red Rock Canyon area very attractive to hunters and gatherers such as the historical Southern Paiute and the much older Archaic or Desert Culture Native Americans These peoples traveled in small mobile groups that ranged over large areas of land following the ripening of various plant foods Red Rock was an important stop on their seasonal round Even the more settled agricultural groups such as the Payayan Culture from the banks of the upper and lower Colorado River near Hoover Dam and the Anasazi either traded or traveled to Red Rock for its resources Red Rock is considerably higher in elevation than the river valley homelands of these two groups Because of the increased elevation Red Rock has several higher altitude plant and animal types that would have been unavailable at the lower elevations How Do We Obtain Knowledge of Early Native Americans Since the Southern Paiutes were still in the area when the first non Indians Europeans entered southern Nevada we have some written records of their presence and lifestyle here For the most part however all of our knowledge of ancient Native Americans comes from the cultural resources they left behind For example we know that the Anasazi Indians either visited the Red Rock Canyon area or traded with its residents because we have found pieces of broken pottery that can be identified as their type of ceramics Some pieces of pottery not only tell us who was In the area but when they were there Pottery decoration styles clay color and manufacturing techniques change with periods of time and vary from group to group Even projectile points arrowheads can serve as time markers to archaeologists famillar with the prehistory of the area Since these resources are our only source of information on American s prehistory It Is important to preserve and protect them in their original location But cultural resources are more than storehouses of Information They can also be part of a very important and personal experience of Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Seeing a projectile point where it was dropped or shot hundreds or even thousands of years ago can provide the basis for a meaningful experience linking you with a person who walked or hunted here long ago If you choose to remove the point from its place not only have you broken the law and caused the loss of potential scientific knowledge you have denied others a similar experience Any artifact loses almost all of its value when it is removed from its original location We all have the responsibility to preserve and protect these resources Roasting Pits Roasting pits are perhaps the most common cultural resource found in Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Roasting pits are circular areas of fire cracked and whitened limestone They can vary in size from ground level circles five to six feet in diameter to huge piles several yards high with large sloping sides Roasting pits were used to roast various foods such as agave hearts desert tortoise and possibly other plant and animal foods The limestone was gathered heated by the fire and then used to cook foods After prolonged heating the limestone was raked aside and replaced with new rocks This process caused the circular ring of rocks to grow with use There are several roasting pits at the Willow Spring picnic area including one of the largest in southern Nevada The large pit is located at the base of the sandstone cliffs just behind and downhill from the restrooms Rock Art Rock art comes in two varieties petroglyphs and pictographs The difference between the two types is the manner in which they were made Petroglyphs were pecked into the surface of the rock Pictographs were painted on the rock In Red Rock Canyon a coating of dark desert varnish on lighter sandstone provides the perfect medium for petroglyphs which are the most common of the two types of rock art found at Red Rock If you want to discover some petroglyphs first hand the Red Spring area has a wide variety of different styles on the cliff faces and fallen boulders Rock art is both enduring and fragile It has lasted hundreds of years yet many panels have been recently defaced by graffiti Climbing on panels can also damage the art as can attempts to embellish the petroglyphs for photographic purposes These practices are destructive and should not be done Other Cultural Resources In the places where native Americans who visited Red Rock Canyon camped and lived they left behind the tools and trash of everyday living Broken pots and stone tools are pieces of the puzzle that when put together tell the story of ancient ways of life and human adaptation to the desert If you see these cultural resources enjoy them but please leave them to tell their story and to be appreciated by others The Cultural Chronology of Southern Nevada Southern Paiute 900 A D to modern times Patayan Culture 900 A D to early historic times in the 1800s Anasazi 1 A D to 1150 A D Pinto Gypsum Archaic 3 500 B C to 1 A D Water Potable water is available at the Red Rock Canyon NCA Visitor Center and Spring Mountain Ranch State Park Water from streams springs or potholes may not be safe for drinking unless it is boiled filtered or chemically treated Water could be contaminated with Giardia cysts or other parasites Many persons claim they drink untreated water with no ill effects but the time effort and personal expense that you have invested in planning a trip to Red Rock Canyon should not be wasted due to preventable waterborne illness The above dates are approximate and subject to considerable debate Some are likely to be modified as our understanding of this region s prehistory increases These dates are based on a number of techniques and methods including references in early historic writings radiocarbon dates ceramic pottery cross dating and comparisons with surrounding areas that have more established chronologies Two other groups were present in southern Nevada and probably utilized the Red Rock Canyon area although no evidence of their presence has yet been found San Dieguito 7 000 to 5 500 B C Paleo Indians Tule Springs 11 000 to 8 000 B C Geology Geology Ocean For much of the past 600 million years the land that is now Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area was the bottom of a deep ocean basin and the western coast of North America was in present day western Utah A rich variety of marine life flourished in those waters and left behind deposits of shells and skeletons more that 9 000 feet thick which were eventually compressed into limestone and similar carbonate rocks Swamps Beginning approximately 225 million years ago crustal movements caused the seabed to slowly rise Streams entering the shallower waters deposited mud and sand which later consolidated into shales and marine sandstones Changing land and sea levels trapped large bodies of water which later evaporated leaving behind layers of salt and gypsum in some areas Exposure of the sediments to the atmosphere allowed some of the minerals to oxidize resulting in red and orange colored rocks Streams meandering across the broad plain deposited sand mud gravel and other debris such as logs In some cases minerals in the groundwater replaced the organic materials in the buried logs forming petrified wood Petrified wood is one of the few fossil remains found in the rocks at the foot of the cliffs Deserts About 180 million years ago the area was completely arid much as the Sahara Desert is today A giant dune field stretched from this area eastward into Colorado and windblown sand piled more than half a mile deep in some spots As the wind shifted the sands back and forth old dunes were leveled and new ones built up leaving a record of curving angled lines in the sand known as crossbeds These shifting sands were buried by other sediments and eventually cemented into sandstone by iron oxide with some calcium carbonate This formation known locally as the Aztec Sandstone is quite hard and forms the prominent cliffs of the Red Rock escarpment In some areas the iron minerals in the rocks have been altered and concentrated giving the rock its red color Thrust Faulting The most significant geologic feature of Red Rock Canyon is the Keystone Thrust Fault The Keystone Thrust is part of a large system of thrust faults that extends north into Canada and began to develop approximately 65 million years ago A thrust fault is a fracture in the earth s crust that is the result of compressional forces that drive one crustal plate over the top of another This results in the oldest rocks on the bottom of the upper plate resting directly above the youngest rocks of the lower plate At Red Rock Canyon the gray carbonate rocks of the ancient ocean have been thrust over the tan and red sandstone in one of the most dramatic and easily identified thrust faults to be found The Keystone Thrust Fault extends from the Cottonwood Fault along State Route 160 north for 13 miles along the crest of the Red Rock escarpment It then curves east along the base of LaMadre Mountain before it is obscured by very complex faulting north of the Calico Hills References Technical reference Final Environmental Assessment Oil and Gas Leasing in the Red Rock Canyon Recreation Lands U S Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management 1980 Hiking Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Hiking The following is a brief list of the more popular hikes in the area Many of these hikes do not follow developed trails so it is best to carry a map of the area Topographic maps of the Red Rock Canyon area are available for sale at the Visitor Center information desk If you have any questions about a route ask a Red Rock Canyon ranger To protect resources please do not collect plants rock specimens or fossils or disturb the wildlife in the National Conservation Area Lost Creek Loop 7 mile round trip easy From the Lost Creek parking area follow either the left or right loop to the creek where water can be found all year One can continue upstream to a box canyon to a seasonal waterfall shown at left Moenkopi Loop 2 miles round trip easy The loop starts southwest of the Visitor Center near the weather station and leads to the crest of the hill west of the Visitor Center At the crest cottontop barrel cactus and Triassic fossils can be seen Along the way a diverse community of plants exists creosote blackbrush yuccas Calico Hills Distance variable easy to moderate From each of the first two overlooks short trails lead to the wash at the base of the Calico Hills One can follow the wash or scramble on the sandstone hills Seasonally small pools can be found In the sandstone Be especially careful when hiking on sandstone Calico Tanks 2 5 miles round trip moderately strenuous some rock scrambling From Sandstone Quarry follow the wash north toward Turtlehead peak for 1 4 mile turn right east and continue up a side canyon to a large natural water tank tinaja This and other tinajas in the Calico Hills are important sources of water for the area s wildlife Turtlehead Peak 5 miles round trip very strenuous From Sandstone Quarry the route follows the wash north through the Calico Hills climbs a ravine to the left of Turtlehead and follows the ridge to the top The spectacular views are well worth the 1 700 foot climb Keystone Thrust 4 miles round trip moderate From the lower White Rock Springs parking area follow the dirt road 8 mile to a closed dirt road on the right east Follow the trail to the fork approximately 75 mile follow the right fork down to the small canyon and the contact of the keystone Thrust where the limestone meets sandstone White Rock LaMadre Spring Loop 6 miles round trip moderate This trail can start from either White Rock or Willow Spring From White Rock take the upper wash going west At Willow Spring go east and north White Rock Spring to Willow Spring 3 miles round trip easy From the lower White Rock Spring parking area follow the dirt road 8 mile to a closed dirt road on the left west Follow this short dirt road to the water catchments at White Rock Spring Just before reaching the catchment the trail to Willow Spring can be located on the left heading in a southwesterly direction The trail follows along the base of the White Rock Hills The trail joins the Willow Spring trail across from the Lost Creek trail parking area Willow Spring Loop 1 5 miles round trip easy The trail follows the left northeast side of the canyon past Indian roasting pits to the Lost Creek parking area From there the trail to the right crosses Red Rock and returns to Willow Spring This trail passes through a variety of plant communities pines oaks desert and riparian LaMadre Spring 6 miles round trip moderate From the Willow Spring picnic area follow the Rocky Gap road end of pavement Watch for the right hand fork in the road and follow to the dam A foot path continues up the creek to the spring Bighorn sheep and other wildlife rely on the water from this spring Top of the Escarpment 14 miles round trip strenuous From the Willow Spring picnic area follow the Rocky Gap road end of pavement At the fork head southwest left the right fork leads to LaMadre Spring The road passes Lone Pine Spring 3 miles and Switchback Spring at it climbs to the summit From Red Rock summit 3 miles follow the ridge easterly to the top of the escarpment Ice Box Canyon 2 5 miles round trip moderately strenuous some rock scrambling From the Ice Box Canyon Overlook follow the trail across the wash The trail stays on the bench to the right north side of the canyon until the canyon narrows The trail ends as it drops into the wash Follow the wash by boulder hopping to a seasonal waterfall and box canyon Ice Box Canyon derives its names from the cooler temperatures in this canyon Pine Creek Canyon 4 to 5 miles round trip moderately strenuous From the Pine Creek Canyon overlook follow the trail downhill to the closed dirt road which leads to the old Horace Wilson homestead site nothing remains except the foundation The canyon divides above the homestead site either fork can be followed but the left is preferable Pine Creek was named for the unusual occurrence of ponderosa pines at this elevation in the desert the trees thrive here because of the moisture and cooler temperatures Oak Creek Canyon 5 to 6 miles round trip moderately strenuous From the Scenic Loop exit follow State Route 139 South for I 6 miles to the dirt road leading to Oak Creek Canyon A very rough road can be followed on foot or vehicle for the adventuresome from the roadway From the road closure at the end of the dirt road follow the trail around Potato Knoll to the left Oak Creek Canyon is known for the stands of live shrub oak and sandy beaches along the wash Seasonal waterfalls can be found

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/red-rock.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    President Warren G Harding The Great Basin is a huge dry region of the western United States which consists of 90 alternating valleys and mountain ranges It stretches from the Wasatch Mountains in Utah to the Sierra Nevada range in California The encircling mountains mean that rivers and streams do not drain into the ocean but soak into the ground or accumulate in landlocked lakes In an otherwise dry and dusty environment the mountains capture enough moisture to sustain ecosystems which are so rich as to be unimaginable on the plains below The 77 109 acre Great Basin National Park is one of the youngest in the nation Due to its age and great distance from major population centers Salt Lake City and Las Vegas are 340 and 250 miles away respectively the park is rarely crowded Many of Great Basin s visitors comment that they see more animals than people while hiking the park s 65 miles of trails A visit to Great Basin usually begins at the Lehman Caves a quarter mile long subterranean landscape of limestone and marble chambers carved by water seeping through cracks in the rock Mineral rich water then created fantastic stalactites and stalagmites columns flowstones rare shields and clusters of snow white needles A 12 mile highway known as Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive closed in winter takes visitors into the heart of the Snake Range From here an easy hiking trail leads to the top of Wheeler Peak at 13 063 feet the second highest summit in Nevada As the road climbs the arid sagebrush of the desert floor sinks away below and pinon juniper woodlands and aspen trees start to appear along with clumps of manzanita shrubs and mountain mahogany which grow to tree height At 9 000 feet Douglas fir and

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/great-basin.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Animals of Nevada Insects Invertebrates Black Widow Spider Venomous Fiddleback Spider Venomous Giant Desert Hairy Scorpion Black Saddlebags Vivid Dancer Nevada State Insect Blue Dasher Yellow Jacket Convergent Lady Beetle Mormon Cricket Honey Bee Aggressive Killer Bee is a type of Honey Bee American Cockroach Rhinocerous Beetle Water Strider Whirligig Beetle Jerusalem Cricke t Bites Butterflies Moths Western Tiger Swallowtail Cabbage White Pipevine Swallowtail Orange Sulphur California Sister Western Tailed Blue Red Admiral Monarch Mourning Cloak Buckeye Eyed Sphinx Weidemeyer s Admiral Bumblebee Moth Underwing Moth Mormon Metalmark Fishes Rainbow Trout Brown Trout Brook Trout Lahontan Cutthroat Trout Nevada State Fish Crappie Largemouth Bass Bluegill Smallmouth Bass Green Sunfish Channel Catfish Common Carp Black Bullhead Walleye Yellow Perch Reptiles Amphibians Pacific Treefrog Northern Leopard Frog Great Basin Spadefoot Toad Desert Tortoise Nevada State Reptile Bullfrog Western Banded Gecko Western Fence Lizard Collared Lizard Western Whiptail Western Rattlesnake Venomous Great Basin Gopher Snake Night Snake Kingsnake Birds Canada Goose Western Grebe American Coot Northern Shoveler Mallard American Wigeon Northern Pintail Ring necked Duck Green winged Teal Double crested Cormorant American White Pelican Black necked Stilt Great Egret Great Blue Heron Greater Roadrunner Mourning Dove Gambel s Quail Greater Sage Grouse Great Horned Owl Rock Pigeon Turkey Vulture Northern Flicker Downy Woodpecker American Kestrel Golden Eagle Red tailed Hawk Northern Harrier Black chinned

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/animals-of-nevada.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Charleston Kyle Canyon Las Vegas Springs Preserve Floyd Lamb Park Tule Springs Place of Interests Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Nevada Trees and Flowers T rees Shrubs White Fir Subalpine Fir Engelmann Spruce Limber Pine Douglas Fir Bristlecone Pine Nevada State Tree Singleleaf Pinyon Pine Ponderosa Pine Balsam Poplar Narrowleaf Cottonwood Fremont Cottonwood Utah Juniper Trembling Aspen Gambel Oak Rocky Mountain Maple Boxelder Catclaw Acacia Velvet Ash Honey Mesquite Tree of Heaven Chokecherry Tamarisk Extremely Invasive Willow Dalea Curl leaf Mountain Mahogany Rabbitbrush Jointfir Big Sagebrush Nevada State Flower Snakeweed Creosote Bush Water Birch Desert Peach Red osier Dogwood Western Serviceberry Skunkbush Greasewood Red Elderberry Cacti Allies Buckhorn Cholla Teddybear Cholla Beavertail Cactus Prickly Pear Cactus Plateau Cholla Strawberry Hedgehog Hedgehog Cactus Fishhook Cactus Pincushion Cactus Barrel Cactus Banana Yucca Utah Agave Joshua Tree Mohave Yucca White Greenish Flowers Hoary Cress Western Bistort Desert Tobacco Yarrow Marsh Marigold Desert Chicory Prickly Poppy Field Bindweed Water Hemlock Poisonous White Virgin s Bower Queen Anne s Lace Fleabane Tidytips Death Camas Poisonous Miner s Lettuce Stemless Daisy Elkweed White Tufted Evening Primrose Sego Lily Southwestern Thornapple Yellow Orange Flowers Tarweed Desert Marigold Heartleaf Arnica Yellow Bee Plant Scrambled Eggs Goldenrod Golden Yarrow Golden Columbine Butter and Eggs Golden Banner Desert Dandelion Mexican Goldpoppy

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