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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Diana Project Current Issues Environmental Programs Water Allocation Distribution in NV Walker Lake Aquistion Transfer Program Endangered Species Act ESA Newsletters Quarterly Newsletter Additional Info Public Lands Tread Lightly Fishing Calendar About Nevada Recreational Sites Nevada State Parks Cave Lake Red Rock Biking Trail Visiting Hoover Dam Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Mt Charleston Kyle Canyon Las Vegas Springs Preserve Floyd Lamb Park Tule Springs Place of Interests Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Recipes Recipe for Halibut 2 pounds of halibut cut into bit size pieces 1 ½ quarts of 7up Salt ½ butter 1 lemon cut into wedges Bring 7up to boil in large sauce pan put enough halibut into 7up

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/recipes.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    him Canis latrans the barking dog Where do coyotes live There were no coyotes east of the Missouri River 200 years ago Lewis and Clark found coyotes abundant in the newly purchased Great Plains but much more limited in the Pacific Northwest due to less abundant prey Coyotes also inhabited the desert southwest where they became Americans when the former Republic of Texas was annexed to the United States in 1845 In 1846 the Oregon Territory was acquired and coyotes in the Pacific Northwest became Americans In 1848 the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo made Americans of coyotes in California Nevada and most of Utah and Arizona Once forced to share the predator playing field with wolves as the human population moved west and increased wolves were virtually wiped out and coyotes filled the void Rodents that multiplied around human settlements farms and ranches provided plenty of their favorite food Today coyotes remain the dominant terrestrial predators from coast to coast and from Central America to central Alaska except in areas around Yellowstone National Park where wolves have been reintroduced Elsewhere coyotes have practically no competition from the lower carnivores and they continue to thrive despite some significant eradication efforts Coyotes are not limited to rural areas but also live in urban centers like Los Angeles Phoenix Las Vegas and Reno especially where housing abuts the undeveloped areas National Wildlife Federation estimates from 1 million to 10 million coyotes live in cities NWF 2006 Think Summerlin Mountains Edge Aliante and Anthem in southern Nevada How to spot a coyote The biological family Canidae includes the gray wolf Canis lupus domestic dog Canis lupus familiaris and foxes such as the red fox Vulpes vulpes A Coyote is about one third the size of a wolf and about that much larger than a fox The coyote resembles a small German shepherd dog About 24 inches tall at the shoulder from nose to tail a coyote is about 4 feet long His coat is predominantly gray changing to tan along the belly legs muzzle and ears It is larger and darker in cooler climates In the Mojave Desert Coyotes average about 20 pounds and can exhibit more red rocks coloration Coyotes are one of 161 mammal species that call Nevada home Life in the wild Coyotes are social animals and live in small loose groups with one dominant male and female Communication helps coyotes to maintain their social structure Their calls have been characterized as barking yelping and howls Coyotes form strong family groups In spring females den and give birth to litters of three to 12 pups Both parents feed and protect their young and their territory The pups are able to hunt on their own by the following fall What do coyotes Eat Nevada Department of Wildlife estimates about 250 000 to 750 000 coyotes live in Nevada Coyotes can be extremely useful for controlling rodent populations their preferred food Coyotes prefer rodents but they eat what is available including rabbits and

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/animals/coyote.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Calendar About Nevada Recreational Sites Nevada State Parks Cave Lake Red Rock Biking Trail Visiting Hoover Dam Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Mt Charleston Kyle Canyon Las Vegas Springs Preserve Floyd Lamb Park Tule Springs Place of Interests Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Old West Cookbook Over 235 recipes in 271 pages From Meat Main Courses to Salads from Fruits Vegetables to Beverages Spirits and from Home Remedies Household Hints Purchase tickets REQUIRED FIELD 1 n 2 n 3 n 4 n 5 n 6 n 7 n 8 n 9 n 10 n 11 n 12 n 13 n 14 n 15 n 16 n 17 n 18 n 19 n 20 n 21 n 22 n 23 n 24 n 25 n 26 n 27 n 28 n 29 n 30 n 31 n 32 n 33 n 34 n 35 n 36 n 37 n 38 n 39 n 40 n 41 n 42 n 43 n 44 n 45 n 46 n 47 n 48 n 49 n 50 n 51 n 52 n 53 n 54 n 55 n 56 n 57 n 58 n 59 n 60 n 61 n 62 n 63 n 64 n 65 n 66 n 67 n 68 n 69 n

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/raffle.php?id=16 (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Center Mt Charleston Kyle Canyon Las Vegas Springs Preserve Floyd Lamb Park Tule Springs Place of Interests Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Online Membership Form YES I want to support your efforts to protect wildlife and conserve the habitat they need to survive 12 Student Membership High school or college 25 Individual Membership 25 Affiliate Organization Membership 35 Family Membership per year per household up to 4 members 40 99 Sustaining Membership 100 and up Benefactor Membership 400 Lifetime Membership 250 500 1000 and up Corporate Membership Enter membership amount No thanks I am not interested in membership at this time but here is my generous donation Members who join at

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/membership-online.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle National Call in Day Funding for Wildlife Conservation Dear Affiliate We need your help galvanizing your members to contact Congress on December 7th during a national call in day to thwart devastating cuts to wildlife conservation funding Congress is aiming the budget axe straight toward our most vulnerable wildlife For example the US Fish and Wildlife Service is facing an unprecedented 20 cut and includes such important programs as the as State Tribal Wildlife Grants Program 60 cut National Wildlife Refuge System Migratory Bird and Endangered Species programs As Congress finalizes the spending bill in the next week the public must make it clear that our leaders should uphold America s commitment to protecting our wildlife and natural resources not dismantle it Your voice and those of your members is crucial We must seize this opportunity to reach out to members of Congress to increase the visibility of these programs address the impacts of cutting wildlife programs and drive home the message to save wildlife by keeping wildlife funding robust As such we need YOUR help to share the attached Funding for Wildlife Conservation document talking points included with your membership for a National Call In Wednesday December 7th 2011 where your members can contact their

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/sportsman/sportmans-national-callin-day.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    NOW is the time to take action to make sure the U S Senate DOES NOT support including anti Bighorn provisions the final FY12 Appropriation Legislation Background Bighorn Sheep are one of the West s most iconic wildlife species conjuring images of wild rugged mountains and deep sheer walled canyons What was once one of the most widespread wildlife species in the West is now only at a fraction of its former number One of the leading causes for declines in Bighorn Sheep is disease passed from domestic sheep grazing on public lands in Bighorn Sheep habitat Domestic sheep carry diseases that do not affect them but are lethal to Bighorns For years now whole Bighorn populations that come into contact with domestic sheep have died from disease As recently as 2009 2010 disease outbreaks in Montana Oregon Utah and Washington resulted in the loss of more than 50 percent in some Bighorn herds Recovery Effort Launched After years of analysis regarding Bighorn Sheep recovery in Central Idaho federal land managers have recognized that Bighorn Sheep and domestic sheep cannot occupy the same landscape without exposing Bighorns to catastrophic disease die offs The U S Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management are in process of taking the most up to date science and management recommendations generated by the Central Idaho analysis and research to determine how to best achieve separation between bighorn sheep and domestic sheep Congress Anti Bighorn Action The effort to recover Bighorn Sheep by separating them from domestic sheep is now threatened by a provision contained in the House of Representatives FY12 appropriation legislation At the behest of domestic sheep producers the House of Representatives FY12 appropriation legislation included a provision prohibiting federal land managers from taking any action to separate domestic sheep from Bighorn Sheep on public lands for the next five years If implemented this special favor to domestic sheep producers would be a devastating setback to Bighorn Sheep science based recovery efforts Federal land managers could only stand by prohibited by Congress from taking action while domestic sheep on public lands in Bighorn habitat mingle with and fatally infect Bighorn Sheep herds Separation is the Key Separation of Bighorn Sheep from domestic sheep is the only available management tool that will remove the risk of disease transmission between the two species Vaccines are years away from being practical More domestic sheep herders and guard dogs have been shown to be ineffective in rugged landscape of Bighorn Sheep habitat Researchers scientists and wildlife managers have concluded that for Bighorns to recover and survive in the western United States they must be protected from the risk of disease from domestic sheep Federal land managers must be allowed to take proactive steps to separate domestic sheep from Bighorn Sheep on public land if Bighorn Sheep are to have any chance of protection from disease TAKE ACTION The U S Senate must oppose any provisions in the FY12 appropriation legislation that delays or stops efforts by public

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/sportsman/sportmans-action-alert-bighorn.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    the category of Natural Resource Management and Julie Gleason as a new appointee for the category of Public Interest with knowledge of equine behavior These individuals will each serve three year terms as members of the Advisory Board Robert Bray is Professor Emeritus of Animal and Veterinary Sciences at California State Polytechnic University Dr Bray who lives in Woodstock Virginia conducted research and outreach extension education programs with wild mustang herds for 15 years while a professor James Stephenson has been a big game biologist with the Yakima Nation in south central Washington State for the past eight years Besides managing big game populations Stephenson is responsible for overseeing the reservation s wild horse herd In that capacity he wrote a comprehensive plan for wild horse management on the reservation Julie Gleason has served as wild horse and burro representative to the Resource Advisory Council RAC for the Mojave Southern Great Basin for the past five years During that time she worked with BLM s Las Vegas Field Office to secure funding for the development of a virtual adoption program Mustang Makeover events and trainer incentive programs Prior to joining the RAC Gleason was a member and chair of the Nevada Wild Horse Commission for the Preservation of Wild Horses While with the commission she helped develop the Wild Horse Inmate Training facility in Carson City Nevada The nine member National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board advises the BLM and the USDA Forest Service on the management protection and control of wild free roaming horses and burros on public lands and national forests administered by those agencies as mandated by the 1971 Wild Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act BLM extends deadlines for proposals to establish public private wild horse ecosanctuaries The Bureau of Land Management is extending from

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/bulletins/bulletin-blm.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Nevada Wildlife Federation
    Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Anaho National Wildlife Refuge Desert National Wildlife Refuge Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area Great Basin National Park Spring Mountains National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area National Wildlife Refuge Red Rock Biking Trail Wildlife Viewing Nature Center Nevada Info Animals of Nevada Nevada Trees and Flowers Nevada Vital Statistics Links Nevada Environmental Links State Governmental Links Other Environmental Links Sportsman Links Just 4 Fun Raffle Invasive mussels found in northern lakes Follow up tests needed to ensure against false positives Nevada Department of Wildlife There has been a preliminary discovery of quagga mussels a damaging invasive species in Lahontan and Rye Patch Reservoirs in Northern Nevada found during routine quagga mussel sampling however follow up tests are needed to validate the results Quagga mussels are an invasive mollusk that destroys native plants and animals damages water infrastructure and harms native and sport fisheries often resulting in millions of dollars of economic damage among many other environmental problems this invasive species can cause These are early preliminary tests said Ken Mayer acting director for the Nevada Department of Wildlife NDOW We need to run further tests to confirm this first discovery As always we urge boaters and other users of any Nevada water to clean drain and dry all boats and equipment between every use No other infestations have been discovered but NDOW has sent teams of biologists to test other waterways across the state to make sure no other lakes are affected a practice NDOW has done routinely since the first outbreak was discovered in Lake Mead There is no reason to believe there are any other infected waterways at this time Even in the event of infestation there is no way to determine the effects quagga mussels will

    Original URL path: http://www.nvwf.org/php/bulletins/mussel-invasive.php (2016-05-01)
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