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  • CHEM-403a May 3-4, 2016 | NWETC
    logical progression with the necessary chemistry refresher which was fairy comprehensive and provided a base for the groundwater concepts to follow J Akielaszek September 2013 Albany NY I have not taken a chemistry course for 16 years and the instructor did an excellent job of explaining concepts applicable to my profession J Sawetz November 2013 Bellevue WA Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics Part 1 Chemical Structure This section covers chemical structure from atomic to molecular scale Concepts of polarity and electronegativity are introduced and interactions between molecules are discussed The basic rules of chemical nomenclature are also reviewed Part 2 Chemical Properties Several chemical properties are introduced that are relevant to chemical fate such as solubility and partitioning coefficients Sources of data are discussed along with uncertainties Part 3 Chemical Contaminants Major contaminant groups are discussed including metals and organic compounds The relationship between metal speciation and properties is illustrated through example Chemical structures for organic molecules are reviewed The interplay between structure and properties is highlighted throughout Part 4 Chemical Reactions This section introduces the concepts of chemical reactions and products Acid base and oxidation reduction reactions are discussed in detail The concepts of pH and pE are explained Dissolution and partitioning reactions are also discussed Part 5 Characteristics of Subsurface Systems The purpose of this section is to understand the meaning and magnitude of subsurface parameters required by groundwater contaminant transport models Properties of subsurface systems and their impact on chemical transport are discussed Part 6 Contaminant Transport Phenomena are discussed that influence the movement and fate of dissolved phase contaminants in groundwater The impact of advection dispersion sorption and chemical reactions are discussed in an incremental fashion Part 7 Nonaqueous Phase Liquids In this section the movement and dissolution of nonaqueous phase liquids NAPLs is explained Relevant fluid properties such as interfacial tension are explained Single and multicomponent NAPLs are discussed Part 8 Hydrocarbons This section discusses mixtures of hydrocarbons in more detail such as gasoline and diesel fuel Biodegradation mechanisms are discussed along with geochemical indicators of degradation and natural attenuation Part 9 Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Chlorinated compounds are discussed in more detail with a focus on chlorinated solvents such as tetrachloroethene PCE and trichoroethene TCE Degradation mechanisms are discussed along with geochemical indicators of degradation Part 10 Metals Metal contamination is discussed in more detail In particular the influence of pH and pE on metals is further illustrated About the Instructor Pamela Schultz PhD Dr Pamela Schultz is an environmental chemist and engineer with over 20 years of experience working in government industry and consulting She obtained her undergraduate degree in chemistry from Providence College in 1992 and her master s degree in Environmental Systems Engineering from Clemson University in 1996 She worked as a senior environmental engineer at Merck Co Inc conducting contaminant fate and transport modeling and human health risk assessments for air permitting and remediation projects She later joined RTI International as a research environmental engineer conducting multimedia

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/chem-403a-may-3-4-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • CHEM-410 May 5, 2016 | NWETC
    first part of the workshop we will explore what is meant by the term emerging contaminants We will compare and contrast emerging contaminants of concern in surface water soil and groundwater 10 00 10 10 am Break 10 10 12 00 pm Part 2 Agency response to emerging contaminants In this part we will discuss how agencies such as the U S EPA and DoD are working to develop approaches for dealing with emerging contaminants We will review recent meetings on emerging contaminants and indicate specific contaminants that are of most concern to various agencies 12 00 1 00 pm Lunch 1 00 2 00 pm Part 3 Profiles of emerging contaminants We will review sources of data on emerging contaminants including EPA s Technical Fact Sheets on individual contaminants and information from other programs such as DoD s Chemical and Material Risk Management Program 2 10 2 20 pm Break 2 20 3 20 pm Part 4 Chemical and physical properties of emerging contaminants The chemical and physical properties of emerging contaminants will be discussed along with how these compare to more traditional contaminants 3 20 3 30 pm Break 3 30 4 30 pm Part 5 Case studies of emerging contaminants The last part of the workshop will present several case studies of emerging contaminants to illustrate concepts of fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems along with remediation approaches Note For most of the workshop the focus is on contaminants from a soil and groundwater remediation perspective e g 1 4 dioxane fluorinated organic compounds TCE and nanomaterials rather than a surface water perspective e g pharmaceuticals and personal care products About the Instructor Pamela Schultz PhD Dr Pamela Schultz is an environmental chemist and engineer with over 20 years of experience working in government industry and consulting She obtained her undergraduate degree in chemistry from Providence College in 1992 and her master s degree in Environmental Systems Engineering from Clemson University in 1996 She worked as a senior environmental engineer at Merck Co Inc conducting contaminant fate and transport modeling and human health risk assessments for air permitting and remediation projects She later joined RTI International as a research environmental engineer conducting multimedia fate and transport modeling to support U S EPA decision making In 2011 she received her PhD in Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina studying the behavior of dense non aqueous liquids in soil and groundwater What to Bring Pen or pencil coffee mug and a water bottle to reduce waste Drinks and snacks will be provided each day Lunch will be on your own Billing Information In order to guarantee a space in a course the tuition must be paid in full TWO WEEKS before the first day of the course by either check or credit card State and government agencies paying with a purchase order are allowed payment under the two week time frame if a copy of the purchase order is received by NWETC If

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/chem-410-may-5-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • BIO-408 May 10-12, 2016 | NWETC
    bit for me Very informative to someone who is usually the netter I liked all of it T Wright September 2013 The course provided a great background for operating electrofishing equipment and actually understanding what is actually happening C Cheek September 2013 Jim was extremely knowledgable and very thorough It was great to be taught by an expert in the field B Cox September 2013 The NMFS guidance and training requirements document may be downloaded here You may register online or by calling the Northwest Environmental Training Center at 435 270 3274 Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any non refundable travel arrangements Reduced tuition is available for Native American tribes government employees nonprofits students and AFS NAEP NEBC TAEP members Continuing Education Units 2 00 CEUs More Information Course Topics Electric Circuits and Fields Principles and terminology Characteristics of AC DC and pulsed DC waveforms Power transfer Electric field characteristics Effects of size shape and spacing of electrodes Water conductivity measurement Fish Behavior and Welfare Fish reactions in AC DC and pulsed DC fields Attracting fish for capture Causes and reductions of fish stress Types and causes of fish injury Reducing fish injury and mortality Effects of electroshock on fish eggs and invertebrates Obtaining permits for boat electrofishing Boat Electrofishing Systems System components Types of equipment Evaluating output Troubleshooting problems Understanding settings Safety features Boat Operations and Safety Safe use of boat electrofishing equipment Common safety issues Safety policies Crew organization Role of first aid and CPR training Field Trip Exercises Waveform output evaluation Electrode resistance measurement Electrical field mapping Voltage threshold for fish capture Fish capture techniques Fish holding handling and release Field data requirements Sampling Design and Applications Goal oriented designs Factors affecting electrofishing efficiency Use and validity of electrofishing data Development of standardized power tables About the Instructor Dr James B Reynolds Dr James B Jim Reynolds is Professor Emeritus of Fisheries at the University of Alaska Fairbanks where he served on the faculty from 1978 to 1999 Jim is a recognized authority on electrofishing and ecology of northern fisheries He has taught electrofishing short courses to over 1 500 biologists in the U S Canada and other countries is the author of the chapter on electrofishing in Fisheries Techniques published by the American Fisheries Society and has written numerous research articles on the subject Jim is past President of the Education and Fisheries History sections and the Missouri and Alaska chapters of the American Fisheries Society He has provided technical guidance to many state and federal agencies including the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Services regarding electrofishing guidelines What to Bring Please bring a scientific calculator and a pen or pencil and notepad if you would like to take notes you may also choose to take notes in your book Lunch will be on your own but drinks and snacks will be provided throughout the day Lunch will be provided on the field trip day

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/bio-408-may-10-12-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • Dr. James B. Reynolds | NWETC
    Projects Collaborative Negotiation Skills for Environmental Professionals Conflict Resolution Skills for Environmental Professionals Collaborative Negotiations and Conflict Management for Environmental Professionals When the Heat is On Persuasive Speaking on Environmental Risk Controversies and High Stakes Topics Facilitating Remote and Online Meetings Essential Success Skills Effective Speaking When The Heat is On Lean and Six Sigma for Environmental Professionals Introduction to Process Improvement Webinar RECORDED Lean and Six Sigma for Environmental Professionals Tools for Process Improvement Course 2 RECORDED Lean and Six Sigma for Environmental Professionals Full Series Webinar Recording New Test of the Testiest Tests Public Relations and Collaboration Challenges Intensive Facilitating Online and Remote Meetings Webinar RECORDED Policy Regulations MTCA Spreadsheets Workshop Oregon Erosion and Sediment Control 1200 C Permit Workshop Writing Policies and Procedures Tribal Environmental Regulation and Jurisdiction Introduction to the California Environmental Quality Act CEQA Model Toxics Control Act An Introduction Model Toxics Control Act Establishing Soil Groundwater and Surface Water Cleanup New Approaches and Implementation Methods for Municipal Stormwater Management NEPA CEQA Integration National Environmental Policy Act NEPA Writing the Perfect EA FONSI or EIS Industrial Stormwater Management Workshop Advanced NEPA Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level Natural Resource Damage Assessment Workshop Writing a Quality Assurance Project Plan QAPP NEPA Writing and Evaluating an EIS or EA FONSI Remediation Toxicology Principles of Quality Assurance and Quality Control in Environmental Field Programs Introduction to Aquatic Toxicology Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment Management and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments Brownfield Site Restoration and Remediation Groundwater Contamination and Remediation Principles and Practices Ecological Risk Assessment An Introduction Webinar Ecological Risk Assessment Advanced Webinar Assessing Contaminants in Subsistence Resources Ecological Risk Assessment Series Introduction and Advanced RECORDED Technical Software ArcGIS 10 Geoprocessing Advanced Techniques for Environmental Applications ArcGIS 10 An Introduction to Environmental Applications

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/instructors/dr-james-b-reynolds (2016-02-12)
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  • BIO-303 May 16-17, 2016 | NWETC
    understand manner J Timm May 2013 Joe is awesome very enthusastic and passionate about his work and subject matter L Bridges May 2013 Reduced tuition is available for Native American tribes government employees nonprofits students and NAEP NEBC NWAEP members You may register online or by calling the Northwest Environmental Training Center at 425 270 3274 Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any travel arrangements Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics Day 1 tentative schedule 9 00 AM Introduction and Overview Why are salmonids important What Is the Difference Between a Salmon and a Trout Salmonid species Origins of the Pacific North American Salmon 10 45 AM Break 11 00 AM Salmonid physiology Anatomy Processes Life stages 12 00 PM Lunch 1 00 PM Adults Spawning Populations Timing of Spawning Runs Timing of Spawning Redd Characteristics Fecundity Spawning Egg Deposition 3 00 PM Freshwater Residence and Downstream Migration Incubation and Survival Eggs and Alevins Emergence and Fry Juveniles Parr Smolts Emigration 3 30 PM Estuaries 4 30 5 00 PM Adjourn Day 2 tentative schedule 9 00 AM Prey and Predators Salmonids as predators Trout and salmon food habits in fresh water Salmonids as Prey 10 15 PM Break 10 30 PM Physical parameters Physiology Temperature Requirements Dissolved Oxygen Requirements Stress what is it and how is it measured Habitat Impacts mitigation and restoration 12 00 PM Lunch 1 00 PM The 4 H s hydro habitat hatcheries and harvest 2 00 PM Ocean Ecology Climate Topography and the Marine Environment 3 30 PM Hatchery Effects Hatchery issues associated with Pacific salmonids 4 30 PM Class Ends About the Instructor Dr Joseph E Merz Dr Merz is a registered scientist with the American Fisheries Society He has over 20 years of experience working with aquatic resources and has been the principal scientist on several salmonid habitat restoration programs in the California Central Valley He has taught environmental science salmon biology and restoration courses for the past fourteen years Joe is known for his work with human and fisheries habitat interactions and for his ability to communicate with scientific and stakeholder audiences alike He has earned degrees in Environmental and Systematic Biology Bachelors Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo 1991 Biological Conservation Masters California State University Sacramento 1994 and Conservation Ecology Ph D University of California Davis 2004 Dr Merz has worked for California public provide and non profit entities on resource monitoring and fisheries habitat enhancement He is noted as an environmental studies and natural resources lecturer and for his successes working with stakeholders He has coauthored a variety of peer reviewed publications focusing on river rehabilitation fish movement invasive species woody debris redd associations and evaluation of spawning habitat enhancement among others In line with his professional interests he is a member of the Ecological Society of America the American Fisheries Society and the Southwestern Association of Naturalists Dr Merz has been honored with

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/bio-303-may-16-17-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • CESCL-101 May 17-18, 2016 | NWETC
    viewpoints from across different occupations which helped me think about CESCL from other perspectives Sara P Dec 2015 Nate is my favorite stormwater resource He is very knowledgeable about the regulations Colleen M Nov 2015 If you manage any field project in the NW it would be good to have this knowledge Anonymous Nov 2015 Instructor Nathan Hardebeck is well versed and experienced can bring a lot of on the ground perspective Understands environmental values and is non judgmental about regulations I Sinks March 2013 NOTE This CESCL certification course is recognized as meeting the training and certification requirements of the General Permit and BMP C160 Certified Erosion and Sediment Control Lead CESCL in Washington State Department of Ecology s stormwater management manuals The Construction Stormwater General Permit requires that site inspections be conducted by personnel certified in CESCL Continuing Education Units 1 60 CEUs More Information Course Topics Erosion and Sedimentation Processes Definitions Types of Erosion Sedimentation 2 Factors Influencing Erosion Potential Soil Vegetation Topography Climate 3 Erosion and Sedimentation Impacts Water and wildlife Construction activity 4 Regulatory Requirements NPDES Construction Stormwater General Permit Local requirements and permits Other policy that influences construction site stormwater management 5 Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan SWPPP What it is and how to develop one 12 Elements of a SWPPP discuss suggested BMPs with examples 6 Monitoring Reporting Record keeping Site inspections visual monitoring Water quality sampling analysis Monitoring frequency Adaptive management Reporting 7 Best Management Practices Planning Operational Physical 1 Erosion Prevention 2 Conveyance 3 Treatment 8 Examples of erosion and Sediment Control Case Studies About the Instructor Nathan Hardebeck Nathan Hardebeck owner of CWT LLC has over 15 years of experience in business development in the environmental consulting field with an emphasis on best management practices BMPs and program management related to stormwater services His professional experience and responsibilities include providing technical expertise implementation of BMP programs treatment technologies and providing stormwater and environmental training for both public agencies and private businesses A gifted educator Nathan is in demand as a presenter at conferences seminars and symposiums He has the ability to communicate complex information using real life examples that hold the audiences attention while they learn the intricacies of topics including stormwater management BMPs and erosion control He has been asked to participate on many policy development committees and is active in many of the educational conferences as part of the development committee He has authored many articles on a variety of stormwater topics in both local and national publications What to Bring Please bring a pen or pencil and notepad if you would like to take notes you may also choose to take notes in your book On day one lunch will be on your own but drinks and snacks will be provided throughout the day On day two lunch will be provided before the field trip Please wear weather appropriate clothes and boots waterproof shoes on the field day as several hours will be spent outside Billing Information In

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/cescl-101-may-17-18-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • NEG-350 May 17-18, 2016 | NWETC
    from the same organization When colleagues attend the program together the organization benefits not only from these employees gaining skills but also from shared knowledge they can use to team up and support one another or act as in house consultants able to give advice to other employees Attendees will learn how to Suspend judgment and diagnose what is causing conflict Facilitate quality respectful communications Engage disputants in a search for common values Analyze conflict styles and how to deal with anger Balance power differences Apply a simple but effective conflict resolution model Use the three features of durable agreements Prepare for a negotiation Identify the complex undercurrents in any negotiation and react to them Understand the interests that drive negotiating behaviors and therefore desired outcomes Apply questioning techniques to uncover each party s negotiating interests and use that information to create solutions Create solutions that preserve and enhance relationships that are essential for success in a team oriented environment or an outside provider client relationship Most people like myself prior to the class know the informal ways of negotiating with the course you learn formal ideas on the subject Sisay A November 2015 This was a great class the best part was the role playing and follow up after I really feel like I am walking away with new incredibly valuable skills A Childs May 2014 Reduced tuition is available for Native American tribes government employees nonprofits students and AFS NAEP NEBC TAEP members You may register online or by calling the Northwest Environmental Training Center at 425 270 3274 Online registration is strongly encouraged Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any travel arrangements Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics Collaborative Negotiations Situation Assessment Preparing to Negotiate Managing the Negotiation Conflict Management Diagnosing Conflict Creating Flexibility and Options Creating Durable Agreements About the Instructor Michael Fraidenburg Mike Fraidenburg designs and delivers facilitation services ranging in format from small technical and task oriented workgroups to large audience conferences He has extensive experience facilitating science intensive issues and as a certified mediator using interest based bargaining techniques to create consensus in his facilitations His facilitation experience includes international scientific review panels discovery and coordination meetings of regional groups e g data managers programmers statisticians and program evaluations and strategic planning Mike has been facilitating online meetings to collect citizen participation input create consensus opinions of advisory groups conduct strategic and operational planning and for training other facilitators in online facilitation techniques What to Bring Pen or pencil to take notes and paper if you do not want to write in your manual Lunch will be on your own but drinks and snacks will be provided each day Billing Information In order to guarantee a space in a course the tuition must be paid in full TWO WEEKS before the first day of the course by either check or credit card State and government agencies paying with

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/neg-350-may-17-18-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • CAPOL-304 May 17-18, 2016 | NWETC
    develop and describe appropriate alternatives Complete an adequate cumulative impacts assessment Prepare an Administrative Record to support agency decisions Reduced tuition is available for Native American tribes government employees nonprofits students and NAEP NEBC NWAEP members If you have any difficulties or questions regarding registration please call 425 270 3274 ext 103 Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any travel arrangements Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics Exemptions and exclusions All the reasons why an agency would not prepare any NEPA or CEQA document or follow any NEPA or CEQA process Considerations in preparing adequate EAs and EISs Eight plain language questions any EA or EIS should readily answer Finding of No Significant Impact Negative Declaration How to make any finding required by law specifically the Finding of No Significant Impact and or Negative Declaration Common problems and solutions in preparing adequate EIS s EIR s Setting Existing Conditions the baseline or affected environment Impacts Effects environmental consequences and the methods of deriving them Mitigation Measures mitigation incorporated into the alternatives and mitigation as an alternative Timing the NEPA CEQA process to the decision making process Understanding the essential markers of agency decision making and matching them to the essential phases of the NEPA CEQA process Alternatives Alternative places to go alternative ways to get there Cumulative Impacts A model for conducting the perfect cumulative impacts analysis everything necessary and not one thing more Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting After decisions are made and actions are taken Administrative record What is required for support for the decisions that are made and findings that are made About the Instructors Owen Schmidt Owen L Schmidt BA MA JD has more than 32 years of service with the Federal Government He has served as Senior Counsel with the U S Department of Agriculture Office of the General Counsel in Portland Oregon where he advised the Forest Service Natural Resources Conservation Service and other USDA agencies in Washington and Oregon He was also a Special Assistant United States Attorney in the District of Oregon Before joining USDA in 1991 he was an attorney for the Bonneville Power Administration where he joined the legal staff after several years as an Environmental Specialist Mr Schmidt received his J D from Northwestern School of Law of Lewis Clark College 1977 and a B A 1969 and M A 1973 in biology from St Cloud State University Minnesota Mr Schmidt is a frequent author and lecturer on the National Environmental Policy Act He served as a Vice Chair of the American Bar Association s Book Publication Committee for the Section of Environment Energy and Resources and as a Vice President for the Ninth Circuit The Federal Bar Association He was the Editor of Oregon Birds a quarterly journal of Oregon Field Ornithologists for 14 years 1985 99 and is a long time member of the Oregon Bird Records Committee Richard Grassetti Richard Grassetti is

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/capol-304-may-17-18-2016 (2016-02-12)
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