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  • CHEM-403a Oct 18-19, 2016 | NWETC
    groundwater concepts to follow J Akielaszek September 2013 Albany NY I have not taken a chemistry course for 16 years and the instructor did an excellent job of explaining concepts applicable to my profession J Sawetz November 2013 Bellevue WA Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics Part 1 Chemical Structure This section covers chemical structure from atomic to molecular scale Concepts of polarity and electronegativity are introduced and interactions between molecules are discussed The basic rules of chemical nomenclature are also reviewed Part 2 Chemical Properties Several chemical properties are introduced that are relevant to chemical fate such as solubility and partitioning coefficients Sources of data are discussed along with uncertainties Part 3 Chemical Contaminants Major contaminant groups are discussed including metals and organic compounds The relationship between metal speciation and properties is illustrated through example Chemical structures for organic molecules are reviewed The interplay between structure and properties is highlighted throughout Part 4 Chemical Reactions This section introduces the concepts of chemical reactions and products Acid base and oxidation reduction reactions are discussed in detail The concepts of pH and pE are explained Dissolution and partitioning reactions are also discussed Part 5 Characteristics of Subsurface Systems The purpose of this section is to understand the meaning and magnitude of subsurface parameters required by groundwater contaminant transport models Properties of subsurface systems and their impact on chemical transport are discussed Part 6 Contaminant Transport Phenomena are discussed that influence the movement and fate of dissolved phase contaminants in groundwater The impact of advection dispersion sorption and chemical reactions are discussed in an incremental fashion Part 7 Nonaqueous Phase Liquids In this section the movement and dissolution of nonaqueous phase liquids NAPLs is explained Relevant fluid properties such as interfacial tension are explained Single and multicomponent NAPLs are discussed Part 8 Hydrocarbons This section discusses mixtures of hydrocarbons in more detail such as gasoline and diesel fuel Biodegradation mechanisms are discussed along with geochemical indicators of degradation and natural attenuation Part 9 Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Chlorinated compounds are discussed in more detail with a focus on chlorinated solvents such as tetrachloroethene PCE and trichoroethene TCE Degradation mechanisms are discussed along with geochemical indicators of degradation Part 10 Metals Metal contamination is discussed in more detail In particular the influence of pH and pE on metals is further illustrated About the Instructor Pamela Schultz PhD Dr Pamela Schultz is an environmental chemist and engineer with over 20 years of experience working in government industry and consulting She obtained her undergraduate degree in chemistry from Providence College in 1992 and her master s degree in Environmental Systems Engineering from Clemson University in 1996 She worked as a senior environmental engineer at Merck Co Inc conducting contaminant fate and transport modeling and human health risk assessments for air permitting and remediation projects She later joined RTI International as a research environmental engineer conducting multimedia fate and transport modeling to support U S EPA decision making In 2011 she received her PhD

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/chem-403a-oct-18-19-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • REM-404 Oct 18, 2016 | NWETC
    included legal real estate environmental financing risk transfer insurance Case studies and active engagement with the attendees will be used to reinforce the points presented in lecture Understanding the topics covered will provide attendees with a current and better informed perspective on the actual risk and reward afforded to individual investors and public entities that are motivated to produce a win win financial reward and public benefit The instructor explains the subject matter very well Pertinent understandable C Stolle March 2014 I appreciated how he encouraged class participation It was a great way to hear other applications of the topics Anonymous March 2014 I found it very informative because of interaction and questions answered in class Anonymous March 2014 Reduced tuition is available for Native American tribes government employees nonprofits students and AFS NAEP NEBC TAEP members You may register online or by calling the Northwest Environmental Training Center at 425 270 3274 Online registration is strongly encouraged Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any travel arrangements Continuing Education Units 0 70 CEUs More Information Course Topics Brownfield vs Conventional Real Estate Environmental Due Diligence Regulatory Options Voluntary Cleanup Program Legal Review Real Estate Entitlements Proforma Financing Options the Capital Stack Risk Management Environmental Insurance Environmental Investigation and Remediation Case Studies About the Instructor Mark E Selman P E With over 32 years of experience in environmental science and engineering as a project engineer project manager senior engineer and technical director Mark Selman Senior Engineer with SoundEarth Strategies brings a wealth of practical knowledge and experience in environmental problem solving to the classroom He has broad based experience for both public and private sector clients in CERCLA emergency response time critical response actions National Priority List NPL remedial investigations feasibility studies remedial design and remedial actions RCRA compliance facility investigations and corrective measures studies and implementation Mark served as Technical Director for a development company engaged exclusively in Brownfields property acquisition and redevelopment supporting due diligence liability transfer and cleanup cost analysis His depth of experience in designing and applying remedial solutions has guided many public and private sector clients to successful and cost effective solutions to their challenging environmental projects What to Bring Pen or pencil and paper if you do not want to take notes in your manual Drinks and snacks will be provided each day Lunch will be on your own Billing Information In order to guarantee a space in a course the tuition must be paid in full TWO WEEKS before the first day of the course by either check or credit card State and government agencies paying with a purchase order are allowed payment under the two week time frame if a copy of the purchase order is received by NWETC If You Need to Cancel Cancellations With 31 or more days notice we will offer a 100 refund or credit towards a future course The credit is good for one year and may

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/rem-404-oct-18-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • BIO-304 Oct 19-21, 2016 | NWETC
    covering 99 of topic Stephanie F Feb 2013 Continuing Education Units 2 00 CEUs More Information Course Topics The course will explain and demonstrate common techniques for Assessing habitat and collecting and analyzing field data Integrating physical biological and aesthetic objectives into habitat improvement design Characterizing and estimating sediment transport and sediment budgets for enhancement sites Designing effective monitoring programs Choosing appropriate fish habitat improvement designs Channel and instream structure design Sediment transport Understanding enhancement limitations Selecting equipment and material Fish passage assessment and design techniques Data and project presentation About the Instructors Dr Joseph E Merz Dr Merz is a registered scientist with the American Fisheries Society He has over 20 years of experience working with aquatic resources and has been the principal scientist on several salmonid habitat restoration programs in the California Central Valley He has taught environmental science salmon biology and restoration courses for the past fourteen years Joe is known for his work with human and fisheries habitat interactions and for his ability to communicate with scientific and stakeholder audiences alike He has earned degrees in Environmental and Systematic Biology Bachelors Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo 1991 Biological Conservation Masters California State University Sacramento 1994 and Conservation Ecology Ph D University of California Davis 2004 Dr Merz has worked for California public provide and non profit entities on resource monitoring and fisheries habitat enhancement He is noted as an environmental studies and natural resources lecturer and for his successes working with stakeholders He has coauthored a variety of peer reviewed publications focusing on river rehabilitation fish movement invasive species woody debris redd associations and evaluation of spawning habitat enhancement among others In line with his professional interests he is a member of the Ecological Society of America the American Fisheries Society and the Southwestern Association of Naturalists Dr Merz has been honored with a variety of awards and has received research and restoration grants from multiple stakeholders for restoration related projects in California Oregon and Washington for salmonid habitat restoration salmonid management and reintroduction monitoring of fish migration and movement fish passage improvement and assessment of invasive species interactions with native salmonid populations Dr Rocko A Brown Dr Rocko Brown is an expert design geomorphologist who uniquely balances applied and scientific aspects of geomorphology and engineering He focuses on process based assessment and restoration of fisheries resources through channel manipulation integrating geomorphic hydraulic and ecological frameworks He has extensive experience in hydraulic and sediment transport modeling and design for fish passage improvements channel design large wood and instream habitat structures and bank stabilization Rocko has led the design of seasonal floodplain spawning habitat and fish passage projects in a diverse array of physical and regulatory settings He has made contributions to spawning habitat rehabilitation efforts including assessment modeling design and construction of projects on several of California s most important rivers Dr Brown has published heavily on evaluating the interactions of topography and flow hydrology for geomorphic processes needed for salmonids to complete their life

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/bio-304-oct-19-21-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • CHEM-410 Oct 20, 2016 | NWETC
    will explore what is meant by the term emerging contaminants We will compare and contrast emerging contaminants of concern in surface water soil and groundwater 10 00 10 10 am Break 10 10 12 00 pm Part 2 Agency response to emerging contaminants In this part we will discuss how agencies such as the U S EPA and DoD are working to develop approaches for dealing with emerging contaminants We will review recent meetings on emerging contaminants and indicate specific contaminants that are of most concern to various agencies 12 00 1 00 pm Lunch 1 00 2 00 pm Part 3 Profiles of emerging contaminants We will review sources of data on emerging contaminants including EPA s Technical Fact Sheets on individual contaminants and information from other programs such as DoD s Chemical and Material Risk Management Program 2 10 2 20 pm Break 2 20 3 20 pm Part 4 Chemical and physical properties of emerging contaminants The chemical and physical properties of emerging contaminants will be discussed along with how these compare to more traditional contaminants 3 20 3 30 pm Break 3 30 4 30 pm Part 5 Case studies of emerging contaminants The last part of the workshop will present several case studies of emerging contaminants to illustrate concepts of fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems along with remediation approaches Note For most of the workshop the focus is on contaminants from a soil and groundwater remediation perspective e g 1 4 dioxane fluorinated organic compounds TCE and nanomaterials rather than a surface water perspective e g pharmaceuticals and personal care products About the Instructor Pamela Schultz PhD Dr Pamela Schultz is an environmental chemist and engineer with over 20 years of experience working in government industry and consulting She obtained her undergraduate degree in chemistry from Providence College in 1992 and her master s degree in Environmental Systems Engineering from Clemson University in 1996 She worked as a senior environmental engineer at Merck Co Inc conducting contaminant fate and transport modeling and human health risk assessments for air permitting and remediation projects She later joined RTI International as a research environmental engineer conducting multimedia fate and transport modeling to support U S EPA decision making In 2011 she received her PhD in Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina studying the behavior of dense non aqueous liquids in soil and groundwater What to Bring Pen or pencil coffee mug and a water bottle to reduce waste Drinks and snacks will be provided each day Lunch will be on your own Billing Information In order to guarantee a space in a course the tuition must be paid in full TWO WEEKS before the first day of the course by either check or credit card State and government agencies paying with a purchase order are allowed payment under the two week time frame if a copy of the purchase order is received by NWETC If You Need to Cancel Cancellations With

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/chem-410-oct-20-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • POL-302 Oct 25-26, 2016 | NWETC
    2013 Liked the major points on how to write purpose and need determining alternatives and cumulative impacts Also on determining significance and disclosing methods M Worah July 2013 Reduced tuition is available to employees of Native American tribes government agencies nonprofits students and NAEP members You may register online or by calling the Northwest Environmental Training Center at 425 270 3274 Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any travel arrangements Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics DAY 1 Writing the Perfect FONSI Ultimate conclusions Basic conclusions Evidence Reasons Timing the NEPA process to the decision making process Idea Proposal Recommendation or report Decision action Monitoring supplements Eight good reasons not to prepare an EIS Writing the perfect EA or EIS Eight plain language questions any EA or EIS should readily answer Writing the perfect ROD Double winnowing SCOPE Alternatives Proposal for action Need underlying the proposal Action alternatives Alternative places to go Alternative ways to get there No action alternative Mitigation not included in the proposal Decision factors Writing the perfect cumulative impacts analysis Actions Reasons to lump Reasons to split Impacts Direct indirect and cumulative Increments to past other present and reasonably foreseeable future actions Writing the perfect cumulative impacts analysis continued Administrative Record DAY 2 SCOPE Alternatives Proposal for action Need underlying the proposal Action alternatives Alternative places to go Alternative ways to get there No action alternative Mitigation not included in the proposal Decision factors Writing the perfect cumulative impacts analysis Actions Reasons to lump Reasons to split Impacts Direct indirect and cumulative Increments to past other present and reasonably foreseeable future actions Writing the perfect cumulative impacts analysis continued Administrative Record About the Instructor Owen Schmidt Owen L Schmidt BA MA JD has more than 32 years of service with the Federal Government He has served as Senior Counsel with the U S Department of Agriculture Office of the General Counsel in Portland Oregon where he advised the Forest Service Natural Resources Conservation Service and other USDA agencies in Washington and Oregon He was also a Special Assistant United States Attorney in the District of Oregon Before joining USDA in 1991 he was an attorney for the Bonneville Power Administration where he joined the legal staff after several years as an Environmental Specialist Mr Schmidt received his J D from Northwestern School of Law of Lewis Clark College 1977 and a B A 1969 and M A 1973 in biology from St Cloud State University Minnesota Mr Schmidt is a frequent author and lecturer on the National Environmental Policy Act He served as a Vice Chair of the American Bar Association s Book Publication Committee for the Section of Environment Energy and Resources and as a Vice President for the Ninth Circuit The Federal Bar Association He was the Editor of Oregon Birds a quarterly journal of Oregon Field Ornithologists for 14 years 1985 99 and is a long time member

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/pol-302-oct-25-26-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • POL-500 Oct 27, 2016 | NWETC
    participants real examples to compare discuss review B Campbell March 2013 I liked the enthusiasm and extensive knowledge that applied to a wide range of projects K Becker October 2013 If you have any trouble registering please call 425 270 3274 ext 103 Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any travel arrangements Continuing Education Units 0 70 CEUs More Information Course Topics Types of questions that will be asked and answered What is an extraordinary circumstance that would take an action normally excluded out of consideration for categorical exclusion Is a no action alternative absolutely necessary in an environmental assessment What is an environmental baseline What is an appropriate alternative for a proposal involving unresolved conflicts over alternative uses of available resources What is an adverse environmental effect that cannot be avoided When is an issue or matter relevant and when is it not What is the threshold for supplementing an EA Can a programmatic EIS on a long term plan of actions be supplemented with dozens scores or even hundreds of EAs FONSIs on the many actions that implement the plan of actions over time If the plan of actions has significant consequences at what point does the accumulation of implementing actions become significant About the Instructor Owen Schmidt Owen L Schmidt BA MA JD has more than 32 years of service with the Federal Government He has served as Senior Counsel with the U S Department of Agriculture Office of the General Counsel in Portland Oregon where he advised the Forest Service Natural Resources Conservation Service and other USDA agencies in Washington and Oregon He was also a Special Assistant United States Attorney in the District of Oregon Before joining USDA in 1991 he was an attorney for the Bonneville Power Administration where he joined the legal staff after several years as an Environmental Specialist Mr Schmidt received his J D from Northwestern School of Law of Lewis Clark College 1977 and a B A 1969 and M A 1973 in biology from St Cloud State University Minnesota Mr Schmidt is a frequent author and lecturer on the National Environmental Policy Act He served as a Vice Chair of the American Bar Association s Book Publication Committee for the Section of Environment Energy and Resources and as a Vice President for the Ninth Circuit The Federal Bar Association He was the Editor of Oregon Birds a quarterly journal of Oregon Field Ornithologists for 14 years 1985 99 and is a long time member of the Oregon Bird Records Committee What to Bring Pen or pencil and paper to take notes if you don t want to write in the manual Drinks and snacks will be provided each day Lunch will be on your own Billing Information In order to guarantee a space in a course the tuition must be paid in full TWO WEEKS before the first day of the course by either check or credit card

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/pol-500-oct-27-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • BIO-303 Oct 31-Nov 1, 2016 | NWETC
    understand manner J Timm May 2013 Joe is awesome very enthusastic and passionate about his work and subject matter L Bridges May 2013 Reduced tuition is available for Native American tribes government employees nonprofits students and NAEP NEBC NWAEP members You may register online or by calling the Northwest Environmental Training Center at 425 270 3274 Please wait to receive a course confirmation email roughly one month prior to the class before making any travel arrangements Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics Day 1 tentative schedule 9 00 AM Introduction and Overview Why are salmonids important What Is the Difference Between a Salmon and a Trout Salmonid species Origins of the Pacific North American Salmon 10 45 AM Break 11 00 AM Salmonid physiology Anatomy Processes Life stages 12 00 PM Lunch 1 00 PM Adults Spawning Populations Timing of Spawning Runs Timing of Spawning Redd Characteristics Fecundity Spawning Egg Deposition 3 00 PM Freshwater Residence and Downstream Migration Incubation and Survival Eggs and Alevins Emergence and Fry Juveniles Parr Smolts Emigration 3 30 PM Estuaries 4 30 5 00 PM Adjourn Day 2 tentative schedule 9 00 AM Prey and Predators Salmonids as predators Trout and salmon food habits in fresh water Salmonids as Prey 10 15 PM Break 10 30 PM Physical parameters Physiology Temperature Requirements Dissolved Oxygen Requirements Stress what is it and how is it measured Habitat Impacts mitigation and restoration 12 00 PM Lunch 1 00 PM The 4 H s hydro habitat hatcheries and harvest 2 00 PM Ocean Ecology Climate Topography and the Marine Environment 3 30 PM Hatchery Effects Hatchery issues associated with Pacific salmonids 4 30 PM Class Ends About the Instructor Dr Joseph E Merz Dr Merz is a registered scientist with the American Fisheries Society He has over 20 years of experience working with aquatic resources and has been the principal scientist on several salmonid habitat restoration programs in the California Central Valley He has taught environmental science salmon biology and restoration courses for the past fourteen years Joe is known for his work with human and fisheries habitat interactions and for his ability to communicate with scientific and stakeholder audiences alike He has earned degrees in Environmental and Systematic Biology Bachelors Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo 1991 Biological Conservation Masters California State University Sacramento 1994 and Conservation Ecology Ph D University of California Davis 2004 Dr Merz has worked for California public provide and non profit entities on resource monitoring and fisheries habitat enhancement He is noted as an environmental studies and natural resources lecturer and for his successes working with stakeholders He has coauthored a variety of peer reviewed publications focusing on river rehabilitation fish movement invasive species woody debris redd associations and evaluation of spawning habitat enhancement among others In line with his professional interests he is a member of the Ecological Society of America the American Fisheries Society and the Southwestern Association of Naturalists Dr Merz has been honored with

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/bio-303-oct-31-nov-1-2016 (2016-02-12)
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  • RCOM-452 Nov 1-2, 2016 | NWETC
    prepare in advance of an event such as a formal briefing or prepared speech The second day focuses on the advanced skills for making impromptu presentations You will learn how to present yourself and your information in the best possible way with techniques used by professional speakers Over the course of the sessions attendees will learn five impromptu speaking models and stagecraft techniques used by professional speakers These are designed to help you think on your feet and to quickly articulate your thoughts vital skills especially in communicating about environmental risk and other controversial hot topic issues Environmental professionals have important information and an important message for stakeholders and decision makers Make sure prepared statements are clear and confident and spur of the moment communications stick in the minds of your audience Come prepared to learn from the instructor and learn from one another in a highly interactive and fun workshop where you will get the chance to practice and receive helpful coaching to improve your personal skill set Instructor is clearly skilled in the field and adept at conveying the material J Corwin April 2014 Great instructor Lots of great information delivered well C Marchand April 2014 Continuing Education Units 1 30 CEUs More Information Course Topics The focus for Day 1 is communication skills for those occasions when there is time to prepare in advance of the event Day 1 covers Having open discussions on controversial topics such as environmental risk management The reasons why environmental risk and other controversies present unique and difficult communication challenges Audience analysis Developing effective formal briefings using three different models Writing effective one page briefing sheets Delivering a motivational speech when you need to inspire action Individual practice sessions reinforcing skills learned Day 2 focuses on skills for occasions when you have to speak in the moment Setting up presentations in a public meeting for success Five models for handling impromptu speaking especially when yours is a hot topic Handling the media interview PowerPoint and other media skills that work Stagecraft and non verbals that professional speakers use Practice sessions reinforcing the skills learned About the Instructor Michael Fraidenburg Mike Fraidenburg designs and delivers facilitation services ranging in format from small technical and task oriented workgroups to large audience conferences He has extensive experience facilitating science intensive issues and as a certified mediator using interest based bargaining techniques to create consensus in his facilitations His facilitation experience includes international scientific review panels discovery and coordination meetings of regional groups e g data managers programmers statisticians and program evaluations and strategic planning Mike has been facilitating online meetings to collect citizen participation input create consensus opinions of advisory groups conduct strategic and operational planning and for training other facilitators in online facilitation techniques What to Bring Pen or pencil and paper to take notes if you do not want to write in your manual Drinks and snacks will be provided each day Lunch will be on your own Billing Information In order to

    Original URL path: https://www.nwetc.org/course-catalog/rcom-452-nov-1-2-2016 (2016-02-12)
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