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  • Hirzel’s organic farm featured in tour | OEFFA News
    organics in the early 1980s Soybeans corn wheat and oats are grown organically on the farm which has been in the Hirzel family for five generations Hernandez said the farm s grain products are sold locally and nationally and through the Andersons brokerage division the farm has even sold some products in Japan Tour participants will also see the farm s licensed compost operations which processes waste from grain and livestock operations as well as the Hirzel s canning business Hernandez said about 4 000 tons of compost are generated annually with about half applied to the farm s fields and the rest sold through a cooperative to other growers Cabbage and tomato fields supply the Silver Fleece sauerkraut and Dei Fratelli tomato product lines but are not part of the farm s organic business Hernandez said the farm was also included in the OEFFA tour in the mid 1990s OEFFA was formed in 1979 and has offered the tour series for 29 years The food production system is a mystery for many consumers This series of free tours shows that some farmers are eager to open their doors to share their experiences with other farmers and with the general public said Michelle Gregg Skinner Organic Education Program Coordinator at OEFFA The more consumers know about how their food is grown the better prepared they are to make informed choices about who to support with their food dollars The tour continues into November The next stop will be June 30 at a family owned poultry farm Ridgway Hatcheries in Marion County Post navigation Federal cuts to agriculture budget will harm natural resources Organic food group to observe Wood County farm Hirzel s Luckey site part of statewide tour Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=348 (2016-02-17)
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  • Swainway Urban Farm | OEFFA News
    farm was also founded to be an educational resource for home growers and healthy eaters Jess and Joseph are eager to share gardening and cooking advice at their Clintonville Farmer s Market stand They are participants in the Clintonville Farmer s Market children s program where kids visit and help work on the farm On August 7 from 2 4 pm the farm will be open for an OEFFA Farm Tour watering in greenhouse at swainway Joseph and Jess gave intern Keara and I a tour in mid April The farm was in the midst of seedling production Heirloom seed starts grew under artificial light and then were transfered to the large greenhouse They were transplanted into four inch pots for selling at the Clintonville Farmer s Market and Clintonville Community Market Joseph and Jess also grow a wide variety of produce for restaurant chefs and farmer s market shoppers From early spring through the fall the farm provides radish kale and pea shoots Shitake mushrooms have been a popular item for years and this spring Joseph debuted oyster mushrooms Lettuces herbs greens tomatoes carrots and more are available seasonally Keara had this to say about visiting Swainway Rachel introduced me to two amazing hard working farmers Jess and Joseph They live in an urban area and yet are still driven to have the most sustainable lifestyle possible I was in awe of their backyard as they used every inch they could for gardening purposes Never before had I thought that such comprehensive farming was possible in urban Columbus Seeing how they went about it I could tell they put an enormous amount of work into their extensive garden Jesse and Joseph obviously care deeply about a healthy lifestyle for themselves as well as the Earth Witnessing how they live

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=334 (2016-02-17)
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  • Local Roots Market schedules three farm tours | OEFFA News
    at Weaver s Truck Patch in Fredericksburg Martha Gaffney of Martha s Farm in Ashland opens the gates for visitors June 25 to learn more about the all natural produce and grass based beef pork chicken and turkeys raised on the farm Mary and Joe Gnizak of Adonai Acres in Lakeville will host visitors June 26 from 2 6 p m and offer tours of this hilly but productive chemical free farm from field to high tunnels This farm may not be accessible for those with wheelchairs walkers or other mobility assistance needs Additional tours will be held in July For more information about the Local Roots farm tour visit Local Roots Wooster and download the June newsletter or stop by the market to pick up handouts with directions and more information In addition a handful of Local Roots producers will be featured on the OEFFA Farm Tour and Local Roots Market and Cafe will team up with the South Market Bistro to host the tour Oct 1 For more information about these tour dates visit the OEFFA events page The market 140 S Walnut St in Wooster is currently open Wednesdays Thursdays and Fridays from 11 a m to 7 p m and Saturdays from 7 30 a m to 3 p m For information on upcoming events or membership visit the web site at Local Roots Wooster or sign up for the monthly newsletter Post navigation Life on the farm attracts green spirited entrepreneurs Swainway Urban Farm Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=331 (2016-02-17)
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  • Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association (OEFFA) EVENTS CALENDAR
    A LISTING HOME JOIN CERTIFICATION GOOD EARTH GUIDE EVENTS STAFF close All Conferences Farm Tours Festivals Meetings Workshops Sorry No Results Found for your request Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association 41 Croswell Rd Columbus OH 43214 Phone 614 421

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/events.php?start=64&cn= (2016-02-17)
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  • Farm Tours | OEFFA News | Page 3
    Floyd Davis of Red Basket Farm in Kinsman shows off his sweet corn and season extending techniques 11 a m 1 p m Sunday Aug 21 Move to nearby Miller Livestock Co also in Kinsman from 2 4 p m for grass fed beef and lamb pastured pork chicken and turkeys Marshy Meadows Farm in Windsor Ashtabula County reveals its environmentally sound processes for finishing grass fed calves 3 5 p m Saturday Sept 10 Local Roots Market a Wooster store owned by growers and consumers and South Market Bistro a restaurant specializing in serving local food are on tap 9 a m 3 p m Saturday Oct 1 Experienced farmers can return to Wooster 10 a m 5 p m Friday Oct 14 for a conference with veteran growers and university educators on tomato production Originally appeared at http www cleveland com taste index ssf 2011 06 travel the states variety of s html Ohioans Encouraged to Go Down on the Farm this Summer May 19 2011 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Lauren Ohio News Service Mary Kuhlman May 19 2011 COLUMBUS Ohio Ohioans mapping out their summer plans are being encouraged to check out what s going on down on the farm The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s Farm Tour Series kicks off in June offering Ohioans the chance to see taste feel and learn what sustainable food production is all about Michelle Gregg Skinner the association s organic education program coordinator says the more consumers know about how their food is grown the better prepared they are to make informed choices about who to support with their food dollars Consumers can get a better grasp of the procedures that are involved in getting food and agricultural product from the ground or from the livestock to their plate or place of business Consumers will see not only the production side but also how the product is processed and prepared for market Gregg Skinner says The series has been offered for 29 years and this year features 40 tours including organic dairy farms grain production fiber and fabric production and diversified livestock farmers The tours are a great opportunity for Ohio families to get out and do something new this summer Gregg Skinner says adding that what s even better is that they re free With the dollar being a little tight in most people s wallet s this year the farm tour series is a nice and really economically friendly way to promote agriculture in Ohio especially at sustainably managed agricultural operations A complete list of tours is available at oeffa org farmtour For audio and the original story at the Ohio News Service go to http www publicnewsservice org index php content article 20164 1 Ashtabula cattle farm is better suited for grass May 19 2011 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Lauren Ohio s Country Journal by Kyle Sharp Mid May 2011 Ohio s Country Journal featured OEFFA member Mardy Townsend s Marshy

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=7&paged=3 (2016-02-17)
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  • Organic Farmers Bash FDA Restrictions On Manure Use | OEFFA News
    is waste For Crawford it s precious Cycling nutrients That s what it s all about Cycling organic nutrients This is a typical practice among organic farmers especially the smaller ones But they may now have to change The Food and Drug Administration considers manure a food safety risk Disease causing microbes such as salmonella or toxic forms of E coli are commonly found in animal waste Patricia Millner a microbiologist with the U S Department of Agriculture s research center in Beltsville Md says scientists are now trying to figure out exactly how long such bacteria survive in the soil In some cases salmonella will survive for a few weeks in other cases it ll be reported that it survives for 300 plus days she says Pearl Wetherall field manager at New Morning Farm spreads manure Dan Charles NPR When they survive microbes do get on food Carrots or radishes of course grow right in the soil But bacteria also end up on salad greens Raindrops for instance splash soil and microbes onto the plants There s a lot of uncertainty about exactly how big of a risk this is But the FDA is saying better safe than sorry The agency is proposing new national food safety rules If those rules are enacted when farmers spread raw manure on a field they won t be allowed to harvest any crops from that field for the next nine months This applies only to crops that people eat raw such as carrots or lettuce The rules don t cover the smallest farms They apply to farms with more than half a million dollars in annual sales or which supply food to supermarkets But that includes Crawford s farm He already follows the organic rules he doesn t harvest crops within four months of spreading manure But having to wait nine months longer than a growing season would completely disrupt his operations We wouldn t even be able to function he says There is an alternative composted manure The heat from composting kills disease causing microbes But Crawford says compost would cost him anywhere from three to six times more than manure And he just doesn t see why he should have to switch because he doesn t believe that what he does now is at all risky Feeding the chickens at New Morning Farm Dan Charles NPR No one s ever been sickened by anything we ve grown in probably millions of transactions between us and our customers over 40 years he says Crawford sells most of his food at farmers markets in Washington D C Yet organic farmers are not united in their opposition to the FDA regulations There s a divide between large and small producers Earthbound Farm in California is among the biggest organic producers of salad greens Will Daniel the company s chief food integrity officer says History is not always your greatest ally unfortunately We never thought that we would see spinach or other produce involved

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1387 (2016-02-17)
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  • Farm Apprenticeships: Keeping Farmers From Going Extinct | OEFFA News
    be a catastrophe Some experts argue that the collapse of the current food system is imminent because of its dependence on three fragile conditions cheap petroleum plentiful water and a stable climate Monsanto and Big Ag want us to believe that only industrial agriculture can feed the world The truth is actually the opposite The Institute for Food and Development Policy reviewed available farm productivity data from 27 countries and concluded that the productivity of smaller farms which integrate growing multiple crops with raising livestock is anywhere from two to 10 times higher per unit area than on industrial scale monocrop farms This is due to several factors including the following Small farms use more niche space by planting crop mixtures This complexity makes a huge difference in total production per unit area and cannot be achieved with machinery The integration of crops and livestock allows plants to benefit from manure while animals benefit from surplus crops that aren t consumed by humans Small scale farmers invest more manual labor in their land The quality of this labor tends to be better on small farms because farmers can devote their attention and energy to intensively managed plots Farm Apprenticeships Chuck Currie left of Freedom Food Farm in Johnston R I explains tractor implement use to NOFA RI Collaborative Regional Alliance for Farmer Training CRAFT Workshop participant Mark Laroche If you decide to become a farmer you can glean helpful knowledge from many sources including universities books and most importantly hands on experience Volunteers through Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms WWOOF learn to dry garlic on their host farm in Princeton N J One of the best ways you can connect with established farmers is through apprenticeship programs You will need practical experience and access to affordable land and experienced farmers

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1357 (2016-02-17)
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  • Number of women farmers on the rise in Greater Cleveland and around the country | OEFFA News
    when people are so poor Farming isn t as hard but it isn t easy either She s grown her herd on her own starting with 12 animals in 2002 Last year s drought raised the price of hay forcing her to sell off about a quarter of her stock Her farm is certified organic but the cattle are not because she can t afford the higher price of organic feed In the past few years she s been leading an anti fracking campaign in her neighborhood Five injection wells have been operating in Windsor Township taking in wastewater from Pennsylvania fracking operations She worries about the toxicity of the chemicals used in that water and its effect on the only ground water she has for her animals Things are brightening though Fracking has slowed with the lower price of natural gas She has a contract with Heinen s supermarkets to sell her grass fed beef She will start supplying the Chardon and Bainbridge stores within the next two weeks It will relieve her of the job of going to a farmers market for which she says she doesn t have the time But they re going to put my picture up in the store she said with a groan Because she doesn t pay a mortgage she was able to spend money to erect a hoop barn for young cattle She said she s happy producing for customers who want a product considered leaner therefore healthier that comes from a more humane operation than a muddy feedlot and helps put money back into the local economy all elements more closely associated with local rather than conventional agriculture I m thinking about starting a marketing cooperative for grass fed beef farmers in Ohio she said She s already taken a workshop at Kent State University and is now in touch with a consultant from the U S Department of Agriculture A cooperative would give us more leverage with buyers she said And we could work toward having a year round supply of consistent product Monica Bongue of Muddy Fork Farm Wooster Three years ago when Wooster opened Local Roots Market Cafe Ohio s first all local food store farmer Monica Bongue had a chance to pay 50 and become a member She ponied up 1 000 believing strongly in what she calls food sovereignty and food security It s another way she said to feed ourselves better She s now on the board of directors This coming spring she and two other women farmers Martha Gaffney and Jennifer Grahovac will launch a new business Farm Roots Connection www farmrootsconnection com a farmer owned local food buying club or community supported agriculture CSA group that will grow food in Wooster and sell to the Cleveland market Monica Bongue of Muddy Forks Farm in Wooster arranges her display of fresh produce at Local Roots Market Wooster on Tuesday Aug 20 2013 Bonque is vice president of the market which sells locally grown and made products to the community Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer We re maxed out here said Bongue 51 of the customer base in her rural county And we have worked with CSA groups who buy from us We don t get the best prices the customers don t always know which farm the food came from and the farmers don t always know how the food was handled Apparently the U S Department of Agriculture agrees Bongue and her partners received a 22 500 federal Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education SARE grant this year to launch their cooperative About 10 farms are expected to participate with plenty of room for growth In designing the farmer owned cooperative Bongue hopes to simplify the farmers jobs Instead of raising a wide variety of produce for customers each farmer can narrow his or her focus to a few crops Teamed with other farmers they can continue to offer diversity without having to do a wide variety of labor themselves Bongue a native of Colombia is married to David Francis an agricultural researcher who moved to Wooster for work at Ohio State University She has her own agricultural history studying nutritional microbiology at the University of California at Davis She has always farmed at home including her years raising three daughters I had this idea for the cooperative 10 years ago she said But I didn t have the money So far part of the grant has paid for marketing materials and attorney fees to set up by laws The rest will be used to acquire a refrigerated truck and pay for a part of Bongue s salary managing the operation Muddy Forks Farm produce sold at Local Roots Market Wooster on Tuesday Aug 20 2013 Farmer Monica Bonque is vice president of the market which sells locally grown and made products to the community Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer We re a little behind she said of the current season We only have a few customers But it s a good practice run to work out the kinks before we launch next spring We hope to make this a pretty substantial business Diane Morgan Maggie s Farm Cleveland Diane Morgan owner of Maggie s Farm in Cleveland s Stockyards neighborhood on the West Side collects a variety of potatoes on Wednesday August 21 2013 Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer Surely this isn t the only farm ever born in a meltdown moment The way Diane Morgan tells it she was living in her grandmother s old neighborhood Cleveland s Stockyards south of Clark Avenue She had a good job at a computer company but it really wasn t what she wanted Her husband Russ a chef was between jobs I came home one day she explained in her sweetly lilting voice He was just sitting there and I started stamping my foot I almost screamed saying You re doing what I m supposed to do What she was supposed to do is

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1306 (2016-02-17)
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