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  • Sustainable Agriculture – Organic, Diverse, and Local | OEFFA News
    and so on So aspirin though synthetic is allowed to reduce inflammation in organic livestock and newspaper likewise not natural can be used for mulch in production Many people also know that organic production prohibits the use of genetically modified organisms But less apparent I think to many consumers is that it s not just about what you can or can t use Organic farmers are required to maintain or improve the condition of the soil minimize soil erosion promote biodiversity and protect other natural resources such as air and water The definition of organic agriculture used by the National Organic Standards Board makes this clear Organic agriculture is an ecological production management system that promotes and enhances biodiversity biological cycles and soil biological activity It is based on minimal use of off farm inputs and on management practices that restore maintain and enhance ecological harmony Organic farmers yearly must develop an organic system plan that shows how they are going to achieve this That plan is reviewed by a USDA accredited certifier there are about 50 in the country who determines whether or not the plan is in compliance with the rules of organic production If so then the certifier sends out a third party independent inspector to verify that the information on the plan is accurate The inspector may spend 4 to 6 hours on the farm The inspector then writes a report to the certifier who makes a final determination and issues an organic certificate Or not And the farmer has to do this every year So what s so special First I don t think it s a stretch to say that the label organic is the most highly verified eco label out there That reflects the grassroots origins of organics which persists today and how strongly the people involved with organics care about the integrity of the label Organics is also hands down the gold standard of environmental stewardship for agricultural production Looking at our own health the average American is exposed to 10 to 13 pesticide residues each day from food beverages and drinking water And while the levels are quite low in most cases this isn t always the case and is of special concern during particularly vulnerable phases such as during pregnancy and in the first years of life Consuming organics is a special opportunity to protect our babies and children Finally there is mounting evidence that organic foods may be more nutritionally dense which makes sense given the attention to building healthy soil MD Is the local and organic model viable in large metropolitan areas Can available farmland using organic and alternative methods of raising food both vegetable and livestock meet the demand or is some factory large scale farming necessary CG Viable Absolutely In fact I think Ohio is perfectly positioned for this development We have more metropolitan areas than any other state in the country Each one of those is surrounded by productive farmland This is the perfect geography

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=248 (2016-02-17)
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  • Off Her Cork: OEFFA Winter Warmer Review | OEFFA News
    way to learn more about the local food scene is to talk to those that provide it right Saturday Night s Event called Winter Warmer provided the perfect opportunity to do just that The event was held at Wild Goose Creative which is a lovely space that can be rented out and used for events such as this or whatever strikes your fancy Their website has a list of events that you can check out If you have never been to an event at Wild Goose I suggest you attend one that strikes your fancy I doubt you ll be disappointed Scott wrote out our nametags while I walked around snapping some pictures Along with mingling and making new contacts this event also featured a silent auction filled with lots of fun local services and a small buffet of appetizer items This wasn t just any old buffet though all the food featured were from local resources Everything from the cheese to mushrooms Being served up was Ricotta on toast with honey The Ricotta was made from Snowville Creamery Milk Beef Cheeks in Ancho Chili Sauce Oxtail alla Pancetta Black bean and Chipotle Hummus on Potato Foccacia Rounds Lamb Meatballs My favorite Goat empanadas That s right goat What is really interesting is that just the day before I realized I had never tried goat before and was wondering what that would taste like I thought it might be like lamb which I do not like Lamb is a very strong meat and it s not something I can handle I tried the goat with an open mind and was very surprised by it s taste texture and appearance It s a darker meat and it honestly looks like roast beef It tastes like beef as well It s a

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=182 (2016-02-17)
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  • Other | OEFFA News | Page 3
    over 25 years He initially invested himself in OEFFA because of the support they provide small family farms by teaching them about sustainable farming and helping them get their products into the hands of local consumers Back them he was gardening on a 10 x 16 plot in his backyard for his own consumption with the aspirations of being a farmer Since then he has built his business growing vegetables on 10 acres selling at two farmers markets five Columbus stores and numerous restaurants He attributes all this to the help of OEFFA Today OEFFA has expanded to more than 2100 members They help to establish the original organic standards in Ohio and OEFFA Certification has become one of the oldest and most respected organic certification programs in the country Their education programs now reach hundreds of people each year For more information on becoming an OEFFA member visit oeffa org membership Services Offered by OEFFA OEFFA works with its members to create and maintain a food system that is good for people good for the earth and good for the future In order to support this mission the following services are offered OEFFA s Annual Conference Each year OEFFA organizes Ohio s largest ecological agriculture conference featuring nationally recognized speakers a trade show entertainment locally sourced meals and more than 60 workshops taught by experienced OEFFA members farmers and researchers on sustainable farming gardening and living OEFFA s Annual Farm Tour Series In 2009 OEFFA organized 15 farm tours drawing approximately 650 attendees allowing consumers the opportunity to shake the hands that feed them and giving gardeners and farmers a chance to learn from each other s successes and mistakes The 2010 series features 11 of Ohio s finest organic and sustainable farms and is taking place now through October Good Earth Guide OEFFA connects producers with buyers through a yearly Good Earth Guide which includes information on farms and businesses that sell directly to the public It includes sources for locally grown vegetables fruits honey dairy products grass fed beef pork and lamb free range chicken and eggs flour and grains cut flowers seed and feed and more The farm list has grown from only a dozen farms in 1990 to more than 260 today and now includes an easy to use online searchable database Organic Certification OEFFA Organic Certification has been in operation since 1981 In 2002 when the USDA National Organic Program NOP was created OEFFA was among the first group of certifiers to be accredited by the USDA to certify under the new national standards As a result OEFFA operates one of the oldest and most respected organic certification programs in the nation ensuring that organic crop and livestock producers meet the high standards established for organically grown food Today OEFFA certifies a diverse group of over 650 operations throughout the Midwest including mixed vegetable and grain farms family dairies food processors and everything in between For more information on organic certification visit oeffa org certification Workshops In 2009 OEFFA provided hands on experience to more than 200 people who attended the skills based workshops on such topics as cover crops composting beekeeping fermentation and permaculture This year they ve organized nine workshops and lectures as part of the Gardening Like the Forest workshop series with Dave Jacke OEFFA Apprenticeship Program OEFFA helps to nurture the next generation of Ohio s ecological farmers by providing an apprenticeship program that gives young people hands on training For an on line apprenticeship application visit oeffa org apprentice Direct Assistance OEFFA staff provide one on one consultation to farmers ranchers and producers to help answer questions and solve problems Policy Advocacy The livelihood and viability of sustainable and organic farmers and family farms are constantly under threat from policies which tilt the playing field in favor of the large scale corporate controlled unsustainable agriculture OEFFA helps counter these trends giving voice to the needs of small and mid sized producers and advocates for policies that work in the interest of the family farmers who enhance our rural communities and safeguard the environment 2010 Farm Tour and Summer Workshop Series OEFFA s 2010 Farm Tour Series OEFFA s summer farm tour series of some of Ohio s finest sustainable and organic farms is currently underway For the past 28 years OEFFA has offered this series so that Ohioans can learn more about how farmers are meeting the growing demand for sustainably produced food Eleven tours will be held between June and October featuring livestock producers a poultry processing facility certified organic farmers farms that incorporate renewable energy and green building techniques and farmers using a wide range of direct to consumer marketing strategies including farmers markets restaurants and Community Supported Agriculture CSA The remaining tours are July 17 Mapleside Farm Hiram Ohio Portage County July 18 Sandy Rock Acres Rockbridge Ohio Hocking County August 7 Mockingbird Meadows Marysville Ohio Union County August 14 Crown Point Ecology Center Bath Ohio Summit County September 18 Bluebird Farm Cadiz Ohio Harrison County September 25 Central Ohio Poultry Processing Bellville Ohio Richland County October 2 Clearview Farm Pataskala Ohio Licking County October 16 Carriage House Farms LLC N Bend Ohio Hamilton County For more information click here PDF Summer Workshop Series OEFFA s Gardening Like the Forest Summer Workshop Series This summer OEFFA is pleased to be offering a series of permaculture workshops with instructor Dave Jacke the author of the award winning two volume book Edible Forest Gardens Jacke has studied ecology and design since the 1970s and has run his own design firm Dynamics Ecological Design since 1984 He has designed built and planted landscapes homes farms and communities throughout the United States The series consists of nine workshops and lectures Public Evening Talks Home Scale Ecological Production Friday July 23 in Cleveland Ohio Friday July 30 in Columbus Ohio Friday August 6 in Cincinnati Ohio Monday August 9 in Yellow Springs Ohio Public Evening Talk Soil Ecology and Self Renewing Fertility Wednesday August 11 in Yellow Springs Ohio Two Day Workshops Fundamentals of Ecological Gardening Saturday July 24 Sunday July 25 in Cleveland Ohio Saturday July 31 Sunday August 1 in Delaware Ohio One Day Workshop Urban Ecological Food Production Saturday August 7 in Cincinnati Ohio and Weeklong Design Immersion Forest Garden Design Intensive Monday August 9 Sunday August 15 in Springfield Ohio For more information about this workshop series go to oeffa org forest or contact Laura Wies at 614 421 2022 or laura oeffa org Giving Back to OEFFA The majority of OEFFA s funding comes from individuals who choose to support them with donations or by becoming members They have an on going need for donations that can help them continue and expand their programmatic work There are many ways people can donate to OEFFA Checks or money orders can be mailed to OEFFA 41 Croswell Rd Columbus Ohio 43214 Credit card donations are accepted by phone at 614 421 2022 Ext 203 Credit card donations can be made online OEFFA participates in workplace giving through Community Shares of Mid Ohio CoSMO If your workplace does not already offer you the opportunity to donate to OEFFA through paycheck deductions you can go to www communityshares net or call Melissa Magers at 614 262 1176 to start a workplace giving campaign at your place of employment The success of their annual conference held each year in February is largely dependent on sponsors and in kind donations of food equipment and supplies To find out more about supporting OEFFA s annual conference contact Renee Hunt at 614 421 2022 Ext 205 If you would like to give of your time and talents OEFFA has many volunteer opportunities OEFFA s strength is its grassroots support and volunteer energy Volunteer opportunities include serving on the board advocacy lobbying helping to plan their annual conference mentoring beginning farmers chapter leadership and organizing fundraising contacting elected officials data entry bulk mailings office work hosting a farm tour acting as a press contact leading a conference workshop or writing for the newsletter For more information about volunteer opportunities call 614 421 2022 or email oeffa oeffa org For more information on the OEFFA visit their website oeffa org Become a Facebook fan at oeffa org facebook follow them on Twitter at oeffa or view photos on their Flickr page at flickr com photos oeffa Philanthropy Friday is a feature article by Michele Savoldi that will highlight a Columbus area non profit organization every other week For more nonprofit information follow Michele on Twitter at cbusimpressions and inkindconnect This article originally appeared on the Columbus Underground on July 9 http www columbusunderground com philanthropy friday oeffa A Deeper Look at Corn August 9 2010 OEFFA in the News Other Lauren By Marianne Stanley Dayton City Paper May 27 2010 It s straight out of a Norman Rockwell painting the whole family sitting down to Sunday dinner with chicken mashed potatoes gravy and corn It s as American as apple pie On the cob it s a sought out treat at county fairs and summer festivals Corn is the United States largest crop both in volume and value What people don t know about corn though can and does hurt them As a government subsidized staple of the American food system it holds some dark secrets History It is believed that the first corn originating in the Andes later spread to Central America and up into Mexico where it was hybridized and domesticated sometime between 10 000 and 5 000 B C Corn didn t reach the United States until around 600 A D By the time Columbus reached America Indians grew it extensively He ferried some back to Spain and by 1700 it had become a major European crop Today corn is one of the most widely grown vegetables on Earth with the U S and China leading the world in production Corn Ohio s second most valuable agricultural crop soybeans are first puts Ohio 6th in the U S right behind Iowa Illinois Nebraska Minnesota and Indiana Yet just a fraction of the 3 plus million acres of Ohio corn is Sweet Corn fit for human consumption The majority of Ohio s and all U S corn is Yellow Dent Corn which is used primarily as livestock feed and in the manufacturing of industrial products Flint Corn is the last corn category It is also known as Indian or ornamental corn And popcorn It s just a subcategory of Flint corn Derivatives More than half of Ohio s corn crop becomes animal feed 8 percent is used for sweeteners 5 percent for fuel ethanol and almost 23 percent is exported to other countries Corn starches corn oil corn syrup industrial alcohol toothpaste high fructose corn syrup HFCS glue shoe polish and a variety of plastics used in everything from carpeting to clothing are derived from corn As an overabundant government subsidized crop companies are finding a multitude of ways to utilize corn and its byproducts Kevin Mote Fireplaces Stoves in Laura Ohio carries stoves that efficiently burn dry corn kernels without polluting the air These multi fuel stoves can burn corn cherry pits or wood pellets One advantage cited by owner Kevin is the fact that these cleaner burning stoves can safely sit just 3 inches away from an interior wall with only a short pipe needed to vent them outside His showroom carries multiple wood corn and multi fuel styles some computerized He or his main technician Dan Norton can be reached at 937 947 1883 or 1 800 526 1978 New products made from corn continue to come onto the market Second Street Market s A Greener You booth offers environmentally friendly products including mini composters that use small plastic biodegradable bags made from corn starch a wonderful alternative to the plastic bags clogging our landfills Corn starch also makes frozen pizzas possible preventing a soggy crust Corn syrup keeps bread and other bakery products fresher longer Citric acid made from corn sweeteners prevents the browning of fruits and vegetables Corn syrup was long ago added to lollipops and other hard candies to keep them from dripping It also stops the formation of ice crystals in ice cream and keeps marshmallows soft Corn Ethanol although it burns cleaner than gasoline is not a panacea for today s energy problems since it actually requires more energy in its production than it provides The Ohio Corn Growers Association is currently pushing Congress to extend the Ethanol Excise Tax Credit for five more years to stimulate Ohio s economy with more jobs while making fuel cheaper for consumers since the tax credit pays gasoline refiners 45 per gallon to blend ethanol into the gasoline supply But it s time to peel back the husk and look more deeply at the darker more dangerous side of corn Corporate greed has attached itself to government subsidies and created a hidden monster for the unaware American consumer HFCS a wolf in sheep s clothing The most troubling and controversial derivative of corn by far is HFCS high fructose corn syrup unknown until the 1970s Today more than 4 000 common grocery store items contain it as a preservative and a sweetener We see it as delicious and desirable in truth it is an addiction and a poison By the late 1980s HFCS took over half of the U S sugar market because corn and thus high fructose corn syrup is much cheaper than cane sugar It s a dominant ingredient in soft drinks frozen dinners cereals breads and a host of our favorite everyday household staples But in our bodies it interferes with our metabolism and our detoxification processes Putting profits ahead of ethics companies poured millions into commercials and colorful packaging to convince Americans to buy these foods The consequences are shockingly visible In just 30 years while the consumption of this sweetener jumped by 30 percent the rates of obesity and diabetes exploded How can this be High fructose corn syrup causes inflammation in our bodies which is associated with the increasing litany of America s common health complaints arthritis high blood pressure coronary artery disease senility obesity depression fatty liver diabetes and Alzheimer s Type II diabetes was formerly found only in adults but now affects our children in epidemic proportions Adverse metabolic effects are also well documented Anyone who has ever dieted can attest to the difficulty of losing weight in this age of refined and hidden sugars To make HFCS all nutritional value is stripped from the corn leaving only a cheap sugar substitute created by soaking corn in sulfuric acid Yes sulfuric acid HFCS puts such a load on the pancreas and liver that they cannot metabolize and eliminate it Instead the sugar overload is stored as fat that cannot be lost because the organs that would ordinarily convert the sugar to energy are in crisis mode leading to the surge in diabetes as the pancreas fails to release enough insulin to neutralize the excess sugars in today s average diet Sadly our own government is subsidizing this situation based on erroneous policy leaving Americans battling corn s dark side on two fronts HFCS in our food and the GMOs genetically modified organisms in our meat More than 80 percent of corn is now GMO corn much of it Bt corn a Monsanto creation that has its own built in pesticide Anyone who eats it can become a living pesticide factory since Bt corn contains pesticides in its DNA that can then transfer into human DNA GMOs in Corn messing with our DNA This GMO corn has not been sufficiently tested making Americans its unwitting guinea pigs GM corn is engineered to produce a built in pesticide called Bt toxin Monsanto s own research found that rodents fed Bt corn had significant immune reactions Bt corn is implicated in the deaths of cows in Germany and chickens and horses in the Philippines Cows never eat corn in nature Most of Europe by law requires clear labeling of GM products but no such protections exist for American consumers since our powerful agribusiness industry has a vested interest in keeping government policy favorable to them while keeping us ignorant Fortunately for those curious enough to seek answers a number of books documentaries articles and studies are available on the impact these unnatural foods and crop byproducts are having on us and on our children s health See listing at the end of this article The agribusiness marketing campaign has been so effective that the average consumer actually believes that corn fed beef is a positive attribute of meat when the opposite is true Factory farming has removed cows from their natural environment from the grasses that they naturally eat Cows by the tens of thousands are crowded into grassless feedlots where they spend the last months of their lives standing knee deep in dirt and manure eating a dried corn diet that sickens them and would kill them within six months if they were not slaughtered first These sick and mistreated cows become our food our corn fed beef and nothing about it is healthy It is no accident that e coli and other food borne illnesses are on the rise across this country The documentary movie Food Inc exposes agribusiness s harmful effects on animals on the safety of our food supply and on the rise in e coli in everything from hamburger to lettuce as a result of toxic factory farm run off While there were thousands of slaughterhouses in the 1970s there are now only 17 in the entire U S America has lost 5 million family farms since the rise of factory farms 30 years ago The result is unnatural unsafe food The hamburger we now eat is likely to be made from thousands of animals rather than just one under this perverse system exponentially raising the risk of mad

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=11&paged=3 (2016-02-17)
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  • OEFFA News | Ecological Food and Farm News | Page 5
    because farmers are a friendly group They work hard and get dirty but at the end of the day they are a group of people willing to give help and go beyond their own to help someone else Locals teach organic farming May 11 2015 OEFFA in the News Other Lauren By Wayne Allen Portsmouth Daily Times 3 11 15 Kevin and Barb Bradbury owners of Hurricane Run Farm are hosting a group this week from Wake Forest University of Winston Salem North Carolina They found out about us Bradbury Farm through a WWOOFing World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms website They got in touch with us and decided to come Barb Bradbury said According to www wwoof net the site is designed to link volunteers with organic farms and growers Barb Bradbury said the group came to the farm to learn about organic farming She said through the experience the group is gaining hands on organic farming experiences at the farm Carol Goland PhD Executive Director Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA said there are certain advantages to gaining experience with WWOOFing I do know some of our farms have turned to the WWOOF Organization to get labor I m familiar with some people who have gotten experience through WWOOFing This is a time honored way of apprenticing yourself to get that knowledge So many people are interested in farming these days are not coming to it from having grown up on a farm so they need to find that way in It s one thing to hear about it in a book or hear about it in a lecture in college but nothing substitutes hand on experience Goland said Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA is a membership based grassroots organization dedicated to promoting and supporting sustainable ecological and healthful food systems Kevin Bradbury said some of the things the students will experience this week include the process of making maple syrup the process of how to prune fruit trees and berries also the process of growing Shiitake Mushrooms He said with the recent weather the area has experienced the group has been working on various projects around the farm We have several fruit trees and we ve taught them how to prune fruit trees They ve pruned apples and we raise raspberries and blackberries those have to be pruned this time of year Kevin Bradbury said He said the students are on an alternative spring break from Wake Forest University He said while some students choose to spend their spring break on a beach these students are on an alternative spring break that will allow them to gain experience working on an organic farm They seem like they ve been enjoying themselves They wanted to learn about food production and small farm agriculture because there is such a movement with people wanting to buy local and locally grown food Kevin Bradbury said They wanted to see how a small farm works and a lot of them have not been exposed to farming or gardening so they wanted to what we do here Kevin Bradbury said he s hopeful the group will get to experience how to construct a raised bed As a part of the experience he said the students are planning to travel to Hocking Hills and spend some time in Athens Kevin Bradbury said the students have set up a Facebook page for the farm where the students have shared a few photos of their experience Wayne Allen can be reached at 740 353 3101 ext 1933 or on Twitter WayneallenPDT Below students from Wake Forest University are in Scioto County this week learning about organic farming and gaining hands on experiences Ohio Business Owner Fracking Stifling Local Food Movement May 11 2015 Farm Policy OEFFA in the News Lauren By Mary Kuhlman Public News Service 4 6 15 PHOTO Sustainable farmers rely on the integrity of the land soil and water and many say hydraulic fracturing is compromising the growing local food movement in Ohio Photo credit David Foster Flickr COLUMBUS Ohio Sustainably produced foods are becoming more popular among consumers but some Ohioans say the state s fracking boom is stifling the growth of the local food movement According to the EPA dozens of chemicals are used in hydraulic fracturing which some growers say puts air water and soil at risk for contamination The Village Bakery and Café in Athens specializes in locally grown and organic foods and owner Christine Hughes says some area farmers were unaware of the risks when they agreed to allow oil and gas companies onto their land Landowners were told Oh no we don t use chemicals it s all safe so I don t blame those people for signing up says Hughes But it has put all these sustainable farms at risk and the conventional farms as well The sustainable farmers are more aware of the damage it will do to their reputation According to Hughes soil and watershed resilience are likely to worsen as drilling continues to expand A recent study found nearly 11 percent of the more than 19 000 organic farms in the U S share a watershed with oil and gas activity and 30 percent of organic farms will be in the vicinity of a fracking site or injection well in the next decade Hughes says many of her restaurant s suppliers are based in Ohio s fracking hotbed The farm that sourced her flour was directly impacted by fracking after an old injection well was re activated near the land They started bringing in truckloads of radioactive frack waste from West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio she says So they had to shut down their farm and ended up having to sell off their farm and move away and take jobs from their farm Hughes says many other business owners in her community are concerned about the impacts of fracking and it s not the answer to the country s economic energy and climactic challenges The horse was out of the gate long before the regulations or the science could be shown how dangerous it is says Hughes At this point a moratorium is really the only responsible thing that we could do Hughes is a member of the Ohio chapter of the American Sustainable Business Council which is among organizations calling for mandatory enforceable national standards that will apply to both new and existing gas and oil development House bill proposes national standard on GMO food labeling May 11 2015 Farm Policy OEFFA in the News Lauren From AP and staff reports Farm and Dairy 3 26 15 WASHINGTON A bill introduced in the House of Representatives March 25 would make the Food and Drug Administration the only agency permitted to label food and beverage products made with genetically modified ingredients The bill known as the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act also includes a U S Department of Agriculture program to label non GMO foods Introduced by U S Reps Mike Pompeo R Kansas and G K Butterfield D North Carolina the bill calls for the FDA to set standards for GMO labeling Foods the department certifies as free of GMOs would have a special government label that companies could use to market their foods User fees would pay for the program Pompeo said a government certified label would allow companies that want to advertise their foods as GMO free to do so but it would not be mandatory for others He said he hopes to see the bill passed this year Overrides state law The voluntary labeling effort would create an industry standard and override any state laws that require the labeling Thus far bills requiring GMO labeling have been introduced in more than 30 states Vermont became the first state to require the labeling in 2014 a law that is set to go into effect in 2016 but is facing a legal challenge from the food industry House Committee on Agriculture Chairman K Michael Conaway said the growing patchwork of mandatory state laws has created confusion and is driving up the cost of food These state laws are not based on science and are both inconsistent and misleading Conaway said We have a federal regulatory process for the approval of biotechnology that is both scientifically sound and works Broad support Response from across the food industry was largely supportive of the bill It would improve clarity in foods carrying a GMO free label by establishing uniform rules and a national certification program for foods that have been produced without bioengineering said Jim Mulhern president and CEO of National Milk Producers Federation Supporters say the bill could also reduce costs to both manufacturers and consumers At a February forum in Albany New York Rick Zimmerman executive director of the Northeast Agribusiness and Feed Alliance pointed to a 2014 Cornell University study that showed a 500 annual increase in food costs for a family of four if mandatory GMO labeling legislation were to be enacted And for small manufacturers the cost of complying with such a law may be too much for their businesses to sustain Zimmerman said Opposing view Advocates for labeling genetically modified products including Consumers Union urged Congress to reject the bill in particular a provision that would allow a natural label on genetically engineered food Allowing the natural label on genetically engineered food would legalize a deceptive practice Consumers Union said in a statement Andrew Kimbrell of the advocacy group Center for Food Safety called the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act a faulty and disingenuous attempt to assuage consumer concern The most effective way to provide consumers with the full universe of information about their food is through mandatory labeling nothing less Kimbrell said A February poll by the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association found that 87 percent of Ohio voters want genetically enhanced foods labeled and 61 percent disapprove of foods containing genetically engineered ingredients Poll says Ohioans don t want GMO foods do want labels And you May 11 2015 Farm Policy OEFFA in the News Lauren By Debbi Snook The Plain Dealer 3 16 15 More than half of Ohioans don t like genetically engineered foods and even if they re not taking a stand 87 percent of them want those foods labeled as such Those are the results of a poll of more than 500 Ohio voters sponsored in February by the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association a Columbus based advocacy group for organic foods OEFFA also runs one of the state s organic certification programs Genetically engineered or transgenic food crops are created by extracting genes from one organism and placing them in another in order to transfer desired attributes The technique is used on most of the corn we eat today among many other edible crops and is a controversial topic among the public and scientists There have been numerous calls for more research especially on the possibility of passing along undeclared allergens There can be no doubt that Ohio voters want the right to know what they eat and feed their families said Amalie Lipstreu policy coordinator for OEFFA The results clearly show voters regardless of political party support GE labeling and disapprove of GE food Sixty one percent of respondents did not approve of GE foods a figure that increased to 70 percent among women Eighty nine percent of Republicans 88 percent of Democrats and 85 percent of Independents support labeling according to the survey The announcement from OEFFA did not immediately include the full report but one was provided on request Click here to get the full results OEFFA is offering an online graphic showing some of the key findings at http policy oeffa org gepoll Great River Organics Looks to Build Name for Organic Produce in Central Ohio May 11 2015 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren By Susan Post The Metropreneur 3 3 15 Collaboration can go a long way when you are a small business owner It means more more resources and more ways to reach your customers As the movement to eat local and organic continue to grow a group of eight Central Ohio farms are banding together to form Great River Organics Great River Organics is a farmer owned non profit corporation comprised of farmers in Central Ohio looking to expand local certified organic products says Adam Welly co founder of Wayward Seed Farm one of the members Our farm individually is never going to feed all of the people here in Columbus says fellow Co Founder Jaime Moore We need a real collaborative effort GRO aligns the values of these farmers all of which are certified organic or are pending certification with ambitious goals We feel like we re setting a really good example of what Ohio farming can be Welly says We think that this idea of creating a local organic brand is really really important for both Central Ohio and the wider region In addition to Wayward Sippel Family Farm Rock Dove Farm Sunbeam Family Farm Harvest Sun Farms Toad Hill Farms Clay Hill Farms and Dangling Carrot Farm are a part of the co op While some of the farms were already certified organic making sure each farm met the standards was an important part of the foundation Welly says it gives them transparency in their processes and a clear stance on what they stand for as they broach multiple markets Currently the operation is focused mainly on the direct to consumer market making their produce accessible through their multi farm CSA known as The Great River Market Bag The eight product CSA is a mix of everyday staples and a few unique items We only grew a few items for GRO in 2014 which meant we could focus on doing it really well says Kristy Ryan of Clay Hill Farms We think the quality of produce going into the CSA is phenomenal because each farm gets the freedom to grow the items that they specialize in growing The CSA is delivered to about 20 community partners mostly corporations and includes the likes of Nationwide Cardinal Health and Limited Brands GRO s collaborative effort allows the organization to extend a traditional 20 week CSA into 30 weeks starting in June and ending around Christmas which means closer to year round fresh local produce The group is working on some other CSA options like every other week pickup or a peak season selection We ve taken a lot of feedback from our customers and we re trying to give people a wider number of options to take part Welly says Although the CSA is the anchor of GRO wholesale of certified organic produce is in the long term plans The organization is just trying to be thoughtful in the way that they grow A lot of people want to buy our product but we believe it s smarter for us to work in the framework of what our farmers are capable of right now Moore says It ensures that customers are getting the highest quality of goods And it takes time to expand as a farming operation In addition to a steady outlet for their produce member farms are also finding huge marketing advantages as a part of GRO Great River provides the farmer a network of support and marketing ability that opens up an array of opportunities that otherwise would not be available to them as an individual organic producer says Ben Dilbone of Sunbeam Family Farm Ryan echoes Dilbone s sentiments Being a young growing farm in rural area While it is very nice to live a quiet rural life the downside is we don t have access to good markets Ryan says Joining GRO allowed us to pursue our farm dream and gain market share We can enjoy the stability and benefits that CSAs offer farms without the pressure of going it alone especially this early in our career Overall GRO wants to bring awareness to and help grow the local food system Local agriculture needs as much support as it can get to maintain economic viability and compete with the pressures of cheaply produced corporate organics that are imported from other countries that we see flooding the shelves at the grocery store Dilbone says GRO provides much needed support to local organic farmers who work diligently to provide an alternative food option that travels far less miles to your dinner plate and with much more quality and flavor I want people to crave that information and the value and the quality of products that we offer Moore adds I want people to crave that as much as we do For more information visit greatriverfarms org Solar Electric Workshop Scheduled for June Farmers and Others Can Learn How to Design and Install Photovoltaic Systems May 5 2015 OEFFA Press Releases Lauren For Immediate Release May 5 2015 Contact Milo Petruziello 614 421 2022 Ext 206 milo oeffa org Press Release Columbus OH The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association and Jay and Annie Warmke of Blue Rock Station will be offering a five day solar electric workshop designed for people who want to make their farm home or business energy independent or who are looking to start their own business installing photovoltaic PV systems The workshop will be held Monday June 15 through Friday June 19 8 a m 5 p m at OEFFA s offices in the Ohio Lumbermen s Building at 41 Croswell Rd in Columbus OH During previous courses we ve helped many people to enter a new career field or gain the skills necessary to design and install their own PV system said instructor Jay Warmke Jay is the author of numerous textbooks on the subject teaches renewable energy classes at Central Ohio Technical College and serves as vice president of Green Energy Ohio He and his wife Annie put this knowledge into practice at Blue Rock Station

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  • Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association (OEFFA) Good Earth Guide Product Search
    Bielek Mockingbird Meadows Profile Marysville OH Union Dawn and Carson Combs Moonstruck Farm Profile Creston OH Wayne Heather Hettick MorningSide Farm Profile Hinckley OH Medina George Remington Certified Organic by OEFFA Motave Meadows Profile Howell MI non ohio Eva Michals Certified Organic by OEFFA Mother Earth Farms Profile Millersburg Ohio Tuscarawas Mike Malicky Certified Organic by OEFFA Mott Family Farm Profile Salesville OH Guernsey Jeff and Shelley Mott Moyer Brothers Profile Tiffin OH Seneca Daryl Moyer Certified Organic by OEFFA Mrs Millers Organic Noodles L L C Profile Fredericksburg OH Wayne Jim Gray Certified Organic by OEFFA Mud Run Farm Profile Navarre OH Stark Alex Dragovich Certified Organic by OEFFA Muddy Fork Farm Profile Wooster OH Wayne Monica Bongue Certified Organic by OEFFA Mulberry Creek Herb Farm Profile Huron OH Erie Karen Mark Ben and Joshua Langan Certified Organic by OEFFA Murphys Grass Farm Profile Sherman NY non ohio Doug Murphy Certified Organic by OEFFA Murray Hill Farm Profile Wakeman OH Huron Chuck Murray Naomi s Garden Profile Ashley OH Morrow Therese Poston Natural Excellence Farm and Gardens Profile Orwell OH Ashtabula Rosemary and John Taipale Nature and Nurture Seeds Profile Ann Arbor MI non ohio Erica Kempter Nature Safe Natural and Organic Fertilizers Profile Cold Spring KY non ohio Kirk Carls New Albany Farmers Market Profile New Albany OH Franklin Suzanne Lucas Nifty Hoops Profile Ann Arbor Michigan non ohio Jeff McCabe Norman and Cletus Duling Profile Ottawa OH Putnam Norman Duling Certified Organic by OEFFA Northridge Organic Farm Profile Johnstown OH Licking Mike Laughlin Certified Organic by OEFFA Nothing But Nature Profile Oakwood OH Paulding Phil and Diane Sherry Oakview Farms Profile New Bremen OH Auglaize Alan Thieman Certified Organic by OEFFA Ohio Earth Food Profile Hartville OH Stark Ted Stutz and Jordan Ringer Ohio Farmers Union Profile

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/productsearch.php?start=250&productquery= (2016-02-17)
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  • A ‘climate’ of ecological farmers meet in Granville | OEFFA News
    decrease in the amount of fertilizer and herbicides needed and predicted the nation will become more and more organic as time goes on In the afternoon keynote speaker and Organic Valley CEO George Siemon discussed the success of CROPP one of the nation s largest organic farming cooperatives which he helped to found in 1988 He also talked about the challenges he still sees in the food industry The world needs changed very badly he said If you don t acknowledge something you can never fix it We ve got lots of problems in the food world and we need to address them Siemon said he and his partners started the parent company Cooperative Regions of Organic Producer Pools to provide some market security for organic producers We really felt that if we were going to have organic food we needed to have a fair price for farmers he said so they could know what they were getting paid and avoid the ups and downs of the market Under attack He said he s concerned that genetically modified organisms GMOs have gone too far and pose a threat to organic interests Siemon also challenged what he called were measured attacks on the organic industry including the claim that conventional farming feeds the world According to Siemon more people are fed by peasants and gardeners than modern conventional agriculture The peasants of the world and the gardeners of the world feed us he said He also questioned whether conventional food can really be considered safe when the U S Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration approve chemicals based on risk level not safety It s not safe he said They never will use the word safe Siemon said he s seeing more and more land go into large agribusiness

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1108 (2016-02-17)
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  • Innovation, cooperation on display at OEFFA conference | OEFFA News
    to the next generation And so we know who we want to be we want to serve the next generation of family farms And that s the beauty of a cooperative is that it does represent or serve the community Hear more from Siemon about Organic Valley s approach Bob Cohen of the Cooperative Development Center at Kent State University shared his thoughts on the feasibility of the cooperative model in today s business climate Particularly small and medium scale farmers often can t compete in the marketplace on their own and so they re finding that by banding together they re able to negotiate a better price and sometimes create the mechanisms and infrastructure that enable them to be competitive and more profitable Hear more Cohen Another example of farmers cultivating unique business models came from Marissa Kruthaup of Kruthaup Family Farm The farm has a Community Supported Agriculture program where each year customers buy a share of the farm s products People who are especially concerned about how their food is being grown they can come to the farm and see where it s grown and see how it s grown and interact with us Hear Kruthaup explain how the program works No matter the model Richard Stewart of Carriage House Farm showed how farmers are always pursuing new opportunities In addition to growing a wide variety of crops Stewart is working to convert a former gravel mine into productive farmland Hear more about Stewart s unique farm and his progress on this project Post navigation Local Fresh Organic Foods in Central Ohio A climate of ecological farmers meet in Granville Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1105 (2016-02-17)
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  • Organic Valley’s George Siemon — a Living Legend in Sustainable Agriculture | OEFFA News
    people reconnecting to their food and that s the good news Seeing how it affects their lives and so naturally local is part of that same reconnecting to your food I could never comprehend the local vs organic because it would seem that if you re reconnecting with your food and concerned about your food and your local community that you would be concerned about farming organically in your local community and not polluting your watershed To me it s a way over played conversation There are farmers that farm organically that don t get certified That s a different story They are still organic they just can t use the USDA seal So to me supporting local chemical farmers vs an organic farmer I m pretty sure that if you look for a local organic farmer you d find one You should always support your local people because that s your local community Local is a value that needs to be built on top of organics not a value instead of organics It should be organics plus other values because organics only go so far on its value model It tells you how food is produced It doesn t tell you that it was produced locally It doesn t tell you if it was produced on a small farm or a big farm or all the things that you as a consumer may choose to think is important It s a consumer choice issue SS What are your hopes for the next five years GS My hope is always about educating the consumer I m all for everything we do in Congress and politics but its been a little disillusioning to say the least Educating consumers and getting them to make choices is to me still our biggest hope going forward Unfortunately the economy the recession or whatever you want to call it just drove us to this numbing conversation about jobs jobs jobs and it has really set us back I am very excited about the web and how it educates people I m very excited about educating young mothers which is really what drives our business You can really see a very positive movement out there that keeps going despite all the challenges SS What about the connection between human health and the environment GS Part of my talk today is to at least acknowledge that we have some very serious health issues and we are not connecting it to food enough or the environment and they are obviously connected Health has got to take on a preventative basis We have to start preventing health problems versus coming up with these health crisises and part of that is through food We are not addressing food related health issues near enough SS What are your thoughts on genetically engineered GE food GS GE foods have never been regulated There s a lack of regulation and there s a grip of control by the GE community in D C

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1097 (2016-02-17)
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