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  • Farmers markets are integral to Ohio’s communities, consumers | OEFFA News
    are helping to preserve Ohio s family farms and rural heritage is by providing low cost entry points for beginning farmers to incubate their businesses By selling directly to consumers a new generation of farmers may be able to make a better living from farming When our nation was in its infancy almost every municipality provided a place for farmers to bring their produce to meet the weekly needs of townsfolk That tradition died as refrigeration and transportation made central markets obsolete By the time we were coming of age on our farms we took it for granted that small scale farming was uneconomical because there was no way to get produce and livestock directly to consumers That has now begun to change Snake Hill Farm began selling at North Union s Shaker Square market 15 years ago We took in only 12 the first day but have seen steady growth each year as the market has grown Because of the markets Snake Hill Farm has always been able to receive fair prices for as much as we can produce giving us hope that we will be able to preserve our land Farmers markets are integral in creating robust local economies Customers who support farmers markets are keeping their food dollars in the local community Farmers markets are again becoming more than just a place to buy food a community destination in their own right supporting non food businesses nearby In communities where access to fresh healthful food is limited farmers markets are beginning to help make such access easier Farmers markets deliver some of the freshest most delicious ingredients available for food lovers Locally grown organic fruits and vegetables are usually sold within 24 hours of being harvested Fresh food is more nutritionally complete because nutritional value declines as

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=10 (2016-02-17)
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  • OEFFA Comments: National Organic Standards Board Spring 2015 Meeting | OEFFA News
    lead to wet litter reduced indoor air quality and ultimately decreased flock health OEFFA producers choose soybean meal over other nonsynthetic forms of methionine such as earthworms and soldier flies for various reasons Some are concerned that they will be unable to procure a consistent supply or that inputs may be contaminated with pathogenic organisms or cause diseases Other nonsynthetic protein sources are prohibited by NOP rules OEFFA producers indicate they could continue to produce organic poultry using the current methionine restriction but they would prefer to calculate and record methionine use per ton of feed as an average over the life of the flock per the NOSB Livestock Subcommittee s recommendation As proposed OEFFA producers think this modified ration would allow them to increase protein earlier in the birds lives leading up to peak production without the negative effects and then taper it off as the flock requires less Producers also feel confident that they could keep records demonstrating compliance with the average over the life ration As a certifier OEFFA is concerned about how the verification of such records would play out on the ground Such a change would require clear guidelines and ACA cooperation to ensure consistency across the industry OEFFA eagerly anticipates improved poultry standards as part of the forthcoming proposed rule on animal welfare and hopes that the link between synthetic methionine demand and access to pasture is considered in these changes We emphasize the need for continued research for viable natural methionine alternatives and we are committed as is stated in the Livestock Committee recommendation to see a phase out of synthetic methionine in organic rations over time While these alternatives are being developed and field tested we hope to see the Livestock Subcommittee s proposal adopted to support the health and productivity of organic poultry operations Zinc Sulfate OEFFA supports the addition of Zinc Sulfate to the National List OEFFA clients are already utilizing several cultural practices to support hoof and foot health in their organic management systems including rotational grazing maintaining dry housing and laneways confining animals in very wet conditions and conducting hoof trimming as needed Despite these practices foot and hoof issues such as foot rot heel warts and hairy warts arise from time to time OEFFA producers are generally seeing these issues in one to three animals at a time not in the entire herd More issues seem to arise in those herds engaged in comparatively less grazing while still meeting the organic grazing requirements Currently OEFFA producers are using varied remedies to treat foot issues including copper sulfate hydrogen peroxide and various home remedies including sulfur and garlic powder a sugar molasses paste and dietary supplements including salt Producers find the pastes difficult to administer because of the need to isolate the afflicted animal a stressful process for the animal clean the foot apply the paste and wrap the foot There are also concerns that wrapping the affected foot could hold in moisture and potentially foster additional foot

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1964 (2016-02-17)
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  • OEFFA Testimony, Comments, and Sign On Letters | OEFFA News
    of the program since its inception and is important in ensuring diverse and broad populations have access to this program Expanding Access to Farmland Credit and Conservation Assistance 1 Provide 50 million for the Conservation Reserve Program Transition Incentives Program which allows new producers and retiring landowner to collaborate to make more farm and ranch land available 2 Prioritize conservation easements at agricultural use value for beginning farmers through the Agricultural Land Easement Program in order to increase the availability of affordable land especially in areas facing growing development pressure 3 Authorize a microloan program including intermediary lending in order to expand credit options and simplify the Farm Service Agency loan application process for new farmers 4 Increase the advance payment option within the Environmental Quality Incentives Program which would make it easier and financially viable for a new farmer to adopt conservation practices on their operations Additionally we encourage provisions that ensure outreach to our nation s military veterans interested in starting farming as well as robust funding for outreach and assistance to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers This farm bill process has already dragged on for far too long Every day Congress fails to proceed forward with a bill is a day we miss the opportunity to make better investments in the next generation of American farmers and ranchers this delay has both short term on long term consequences for our communities We urge you to move deliberately and swiftly in finalizing a farm bill that incorporates these beginning farmer measures Sincerely Agribusiness Incubator Program Agriculture and Land Based Training Association Alden Economic Development Committee Alternative Energy Resources Organization Angelic Organics Learning Center Beau Chemin Preservation Farm Beginning Farmers LLC Black Farmers Agriculturalists Association California Certified Organic Farmers California FarmLink Carolina Farm Stewardship Association Catholic Charities of Louisville Refugee Agricultural Partnership Program Catholic Charities of Northeast Kansas Center for Rural Affairs Chicago Botanic Garden Community Alliance with Family Farmers Community CROPS Community Food Agriculture Coalition Community Food and Justice Coalition Cultivate Kansas City Cultivating Community Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship Dakota Rural Action Delta Land Community Earth Learning Ecological Farming Association Elma C Lomax Incubator Farm Family Farm Defenders Farley Center Farm Incubator Farm Fresh Rhode Island Farmer Veteran Coalition Farmworker Association of Florida Inc FARRMS Fay Penn Economic Development Council Finger Lakes Collaborative Regional Alliance for Farmer Training Food Water Watch Food Democracy Now Food Field Food Works Georgia Organics GoFarm Hawaii Groundswell Center for Local Food Farming Hawthorne Valley Farm Hmong National Development Inc Hope Farms Bethany Christian Services Illinois Stewardship Alliance Independent Living Services of Northern California Institute for Washington s Future Intertribal Agriculture Council Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement Iowa Farmers Union Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Just Food KAKOO OIWI Kansas Rural Center Kauai Community College Kerr Center Inc Land For Good Land Stewardship Project Leeward Community College Liberty Prairie Foundation Local Food Hub Lowcountry Local First Lutheran Social Services New Lands Farm Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association Maine Rural Partners Michael Fields Agricultural Institute Michigan Farmers Union Michigan Food and Farming Systems Michigan Land Use Institute Michigan Organic Food and Farm Alliance Midwest Organic Sustainable Education Service Minnesota Citizens Organized Acting Together Minnesota Farmers Union Minnesota Food Association National Catholic Rural Life Conference National Farmers Organization National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition National Women In Agriculture Association National Young Farmers Coalition Nebraska Sustainable Agriculture Society INC NSAS New England Farmers Union New Entry Sustainable Farming Project New Farmers Network New York Bee Wellness North Country Sustainability Center Northeast Organic Farming Association Interstate Council Northeast Organic Farming Association New Hampshire Northeast Organic Farming Association New York Northeast Organic Farming Association Rhode Island Northeast Organic Farming Association Vermont Northeast Pasture Consortium Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group NESAWG Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides Northwest Farm Bill Action Group Northwest Michigan Council of Governments Northwest Michigan Food and Farming Network Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association Oklahoma Farm and Food Alliance Okmulgee County Farmers and Ranchers Onslow County Farmers Market Inc Oregon Tilth Organization for Refugee and Immigrant Success PMJ Capital Corporation Practical Farmers of Iowa Prairie Fruits Farm and Creamery Pushing the Envelope Farm Rogue Farm Corps Root N Roost Farm Rural Advancement Foundation International School Food FOCUS National Seattle Tilth Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee Slow Food California Slow Food Nebraska Slow Food USA Southeastern Massachusetts Agricultural Partnership Inc Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy Southern Exposure Seed Exchange Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group Stoneyfield Farm Sustainable Farming Association SustainFloyd Texas Mexico Border Coalition CBO The Brice Institute The Land Connection Tilth Producers of Washington Truly Living Well United Farmers USA Vermont Land Trust Virginia Association for Biological Farming Viva Farms Walk Farm Incorporated Washington Young Farmers Coalition Wisconsin Farmers Union Women Food and Agriculture Network World Farmers Inc Wren s Nest Farm BLM Fracking Rule Letter to Sen Sherrod Brown August 27 2013 OEFFA Testimony Comments and Sign On Letters Lauren August 19 2013 The Honorable Sherrod Brown United States Senate 713 Hart Senate Office Building Washington D C 20510 3503 Dear Senator Brown The undersigned organizations are concerned with the Bureau of Land Management s BLM draft rule related to hydraulic fracturing fracking on federal and tribal lands 1 and we urge you to consider our concerns and share them with the BLM and Obama Administration We ask you to advocate for The prohibition of fracking in critical sensitive areas including National Forests land contiguous to National Parks and source water areas among others Banning the use of open waste pits The full disclosure of chemical inputs and thorough pre drilling water testing And banning the use of diesel and other toxic chemicals The rule provides much needed guidelines for drilling activities on federal and tribal land that the BLM has jurisdiction over and the current draft rule is actually in its second iteration as the first version elicited approximately 175 000 comments to the BLM Despite that most of these comments were likely critical of the rule s deficiencies the BLM instead of correcting these deficiencies based on received comments yielded to industry pressure and weakened the rule in its second version The BLM holds more than 700 million acres of subsurface mineral rights across the United States and while much of the land attached to these rights is in the western US there are parcels of land that would be affected in the east and specifically Ohio In Ohio the most notable impacts will occur in the Wayne National Forest Ohio s only National Forest But the BLM also holds mineral rights within non federal lands and it appears to intend to lease these lands for fracking as well it is currently pursuing leasing in Blue Rock State Forest The rule is supposed to be a comprehensive attempt at providing proper regulation to ensure a greater level of protection from fracking that occurs on federal and tribal lands and update the existing regulations which are recognized as inadequate However the current version of the rule falls short of achieving even minimal protection for a variety of reasons It is also important to recognize that although significantly updating existing regulations will provide more protections against the harms of drilling these regulations cannot eliminate the environmental and public health risks that fracking poses Perhaps the most concerning deficiency with the rule is that it fails to address or recognize that certain areas such as Wayne National Forest might be too sensitive or critical for fracking activities Inherent in the practice of fracking is land industrialization inevitable air pollution eventual water pollution and an enormous increase in traffic and water use For lands that have been designated or set aside because of their ecological value or because they contain a drinking water source there must be some mechanism to make them off limits to fracking activity In fact the importance of a provision to protect certain unique and sensitive areas was outlined as a recommendation by President Obama s shale gas advisory subcommittee in its August 2011 90 Day Report 2 The rule is devoid of many basic best management practices and requirements Perhaps the most glaring of these is the failure to prohibit the use of fracking waste pits These pits are highly problematic for a number of reasons including that animals can easily access them the risk of failure contamination relative to other containment methods e g closed loop systems and the lack of requirements related to liner integrity The BLM even recognized these and other risks related to open pits in a 2012 Instructional Memorandum advising BLM employees to attempt to have drillers utilize closed loop systems 3 The draft rule also does an inadequate job in regards to chemical disclosure The chemical disclosure requirement in the rule relies on FracFocus which has been shown to be a flawed method of disclosure 4 In the current version of the rule drilling companies do not need to provide the chemical constituents of their drilling fluid until after a well is fracked they have the ability to shield themselves from disclosure based on trade secret provisions and they do not even need to provide the exact inputs for each well but rather merely provide the inputs for a representative well This is unacceptable and poses considerable risk to the environment and human health Instead every chemical that is injected into each individual well should be disclosed before fracking occurs trade secrets provisions should be completely eliminated and thorough baseline water testing should be conducted prior to drilling The use of diesel fluid as well as other toxic chemicals that have been proven to be dangerous should also be prohibited The BLM rule also fails to address well construction guidelines and setbacks for specific areas such as houses schools and campgrounds Studies indicate that all well casings will fail at some point and a significant number fail in the beginning of their lives 5 Thus it is essential that stringent well construction rules are adopted within this rule recognizing that even thoughtfully designed well construction rules cannot prevent the failure of well casings over time Responsible siting of wells is also important Sufficient set backs should be adopted to protect homes schools campgrounds and recreational areas water sources and other sensitive locations Finally air pollution regulations should be incorporated into the rule as fracking sites are responsible for a substantial volume of concerning air contaminants including methane nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds These emissions pose a grave risk to human health as well as the health of our climate The current BLM rule does not address these concerns and should be altered to prevent the practice of flaring and require green completions Thank you for considering our recommendations to limit damage from fracking on public lands Although our recommendations will not mitigate all the risks associated with fracking they provide much more meaningful protections than the current version of the BLM s fracking rule Again we urge you to contact the BLM directly as well as the Obama Administration and share our and your concerns about these rules Sincerely The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association Sierra Club Ohio Chapter A full list of organizations that signed on is available through the Sierra Club Ohio Chapter 1 Bureau of Land Management US Department of the Interior Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal and Tribal Lands 43 CFR 3160 available from http www blm gov pgdata etc medialib blm wo Communications Directorate public affairs hydraulicfracturing Par 91723 File tmp HydFrac SupProposal pdf 2 U S Department of Energy Shale Gas Production Subcommittee Secretary of Energy Advisory Board The SEAB Gas Production Subcommittee Ninety Day Report August 11 2011 3 U S Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Instruction Memorandum No 2013 033 December 13 2012 available from http www blm gov wo st en info regulations Instruction Memos and Bulletins national instruction 2013 IM 2013 033 html 4 Kate Konschink Margaret Holden and Alexa Shasteen Legal Fractures in Chemical Disclosure Laws Environmental Law Program Policy Initiative Harvard Law School April 23 2013 available from http www eenews net assets 2013 04 23 document ew 01 pdf 5 Anthony Ingraffea Fluid Migration Mechanisms Due to Faulty Well Design and or Construction An Overview and Recent Experiences in the Pennsylvania Marcellus Play Physicians Scientists Engineers for Healthy Energy October 2012 available from http www damascuscitizensforsustainability org wp content uploads 2012 11 PSECementFailureCausesRateAnalysisIngraffea pdf Full and Fair Farm Bill NOW July 22 2013 OEFFA Testimony Comments and Sign On Letters Lauren July 18 2013 The undersigned 243 groups from all parts of the country have joined together today to demand that Congress develop and pass a full and fair Farm Bill this summer without further delay A full and fair Farm Bill must include farm food and nutrition conservation and rural economic development programs and commodity and crop insurance reforms It must also provide renewed and enhanced funding for the now stranded but critical subset of programs that assist the most chronically under served segments of agriculture and our rural and urban communities The House and Senate should immediately appoint conferees to work in an open and urgent fashion toward adopting a final full and fair Farm Bill this summer The final bill should include All nutrition programs while rejecting all cuts or changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program SNAP that would increase hunger or reduce access to nutrition education for any of the 47 million Americans who currently rely on the program to meet basic food needs Full funding for farm conservation programs enhanced and streamlined to better meet the pressing and accelerating natural resource and environmental issues of our day The cost saving crop insurance and commodity subsidy reforms included in one or both bills including payment limit reform national sodsaver and conservation compliance re linked to crop insurance plus additional reforms needed to create a strong targeted and cost effective safety net Robust provisions and funding to increase economic opportunity for the nation s diverse family farmers and ranchers farm and food workers rural and urban communities and Indian Tribes and Provisions to ensure that a comprehensive farm bill with all titles will be updated on a regular five year basis as conditions in the food and farm system change We support equity justice opportunity and access across all titles of the Farm Bill Therefore we support removing elements that make the bill less fair and that weaken protections for consumers including those in need of food assistance or of farmers labor and the environment These include provisions restricting SNAP eligibility as well as those related to the Grain Inspection Packers and Stockyards Act GIPSA the Environmental Protection Agency EPA the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Commerce Clause We further pledge to work with Congress to secure passage of a Farm Billpackage that continues the currently stranded programs that are so critical to producers and communities around the country These vital programs representing a small fraction of overall Farm Bill investments support beginning socially disadvantaged tribal women and veteran farmers and ranchers rural economic development and job creation renewable energy fruit and vegetable production organic farmers local and regional food systems farmers markets healthy food access and community food and urban agriculture projects Completion of a full and fair Farm Bill in 2013 is critical to the health of our recovering national economy We strongly urge Congress to act now to assure access to affordable healthy and nutritious food for all support the next generations of our nation s farmers and ranchers protect farm and ranch land forests and other natural resources advance food and agriculture based economic development and investment in sustainable agriculture and food system research promote energy conservation and renewable energy production rebuild local and regional food infrastructure and markets and ensure the success of our nation s diverse producers farm and food chain workers and communities in greatest need of the landmark programs wisely created by Congress in the past several Farm Bills programs which must be funded as part of a full and fair farm bill 21st Century Youth Leadership Movement Eutaw AL American Friends Service Committee Southern NM Agriculture Apprentice Project El Paso TX Agri Cultura Network Albuquerque NM Agricultural Missions Inc New York NY Alabama State Association of Cooperatives Forkland AL Alamosa Community Gardens Alamosa CO Alianza Nacional de Campesinas Oxnard CA Alternative Energy Resources Organization Helena MT America the Beautiful Fund Washington DC American Federation of Government Employees Local 3354 St Louis MO American Sustainable Business Council New York NY Angelic Organics Learning Center Caledonia IL Archetypical Women Minneapolis MN Arkansas Land and Farm Development Corporation Brinkley AK Ashtabula Geauga Lake Counties Farmers Union Windsor OH Bay Localize Oakland CA Black Farmers and Agriculturalists Association Tillery NC Broadfork Farm Moseley VA Brooklyn Food Coalition Brooklyn NY California FarmLink Sacramento CA California Institute for Rural Studies Davis CA CAN Act Davis CA Carolina Farm Stewardship Association Pittsboro NC Cascade Harvest Coalition Seattle WA Catholic Charities Rural Life Coordinator St Cloud MN Catholic Charities Arcadia FL Catholic Rural Life Conference of the St Martin Deanery Georgetown OH Center for Rural Affairs Lyons NE Center for Social Inclusion New York NY Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture San Francisco CA Center of Social Sustainable Systems CESOSS Albuquerque NM Cervantes Orchards Sunnyside WA Chesapeake Food Safety Nottingham MD Chilili Land Grant Chilili NM Church Women United in New York State Rochester NY ColorOfChange org Oakland CA Community Alliance with Family Farmers Davis CA Community Environmental Council Santa Barbara CA Community Farm Alliance Frankfort KY Community Food Agriculture Coalition Missoula MT Community Food and Justice Coalition Oakland CA Concerned Citizens of Tillery Tillery NC Corn Dance Ltd Oklahoma City OK CSA Center For Social Advocacy San Diego CA Cultivating Community Portland ME Dakota Rural Action Brookings SD Damascus Citizens for Sustainability Milanville PA Delta Land Community Almyra AR Detroit Food Justice Taskforce Detroit MI Dine Agriculture Inc Shiprock NM Dine Policy Institute Tsaile AZ Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Springfield IL Dockery Group LLC Elm City NC Earth Cluster of Franciscans International Rochester MN Echota Cherokee Nation Fort Washington MD Ecological Farming Association Soquel CA Edible San Diego San Diego CA Environmental Working Group Washington DC Equinox Farm Shirley IN Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Chicago IL Fair World Project Portland OR Family Farm Defenders Madison WI Farm Aid Cambridge MA Farm to Table New Mexico Santa Fe NM Farm to Table Food Services Oakland CA FarmBillPrimer org Baltimore MD Farmer Jane Sebastopol CA Farmers on the Move Battle Creek MI Farms Not Arms Petaluma CA Farmworker Association of Florida Inc Apopka FL Farmworkers Center El Paso TX Fay Penn Economic Development Council Lemont Furnace PA Federation of Southern Cooperatives Land Assistance Fund Atlanta GA Feeding America San Diego San Diego CA Florida Certified Organic Growers Consumers FOG Gainesville FL Food and You West Des Moines IA Food Chain Workers Alliance Los Angeles CA Food Democracy NOW Seattle WA Food For All Buffalo NY Food System Economic Partnership Ann Arbor MI Food Health and Environmental Justice Coalition Kansas City KS For Chicana Chicano Studies Foundation Northridge CA Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration La Crosse WI FRESHFARM Markets Washington DC Fresno Interdenominational Refugee Ministries FIRM Inc Fresno CA Georgia Organics Atlanta GA Grassroots International Boston MA Greater Grand Rapids Food Systems Council Grand Rapids MI Green Bee Soda Brunswick ME Green For All Washington DC Greene County Democrat weekly newspaper Eutaw AL GrowFood org Mount Vernon WA Haitian International Youth Leadership Institute Inc Shannon NC Hazon San Francisco CA Health Care Without Harm Reston VA Hill Connections Chaseburg WI Hmong National Development Inc Washington DC Hour Children LIC NY Housing Assistance Council Washington DC Hunger Action Los Angeles Los Angeles CA Hunger Action Network of New York State New York NY Indian Nations Conservation Alliance Twin Bridges MT Inland Mexican Heritage Joshua Tree CA Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy Minneapolis MN Institute for Community Engagement Las Cruces NM Interfaith Community Services Escondido CA Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative Sebastopol CA Intertribal Agriculture Council Billings MT Iowa Environmental Council Des Moines IA Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Baltimore MD Kentucky Resources Council Inc Frankfort KY Kikandwa Environmental Association Kampala WI La Semilla Food Center Las Cruces NM Land Stewardship Project Minneapolis MN Latinos in Agriculture Leaders Conference San Antonio TX Lideres Campesinas Oxnard CA Little Sisters of the Assumption Family Health Service New York NY Live Real Boston MA Local Food Hub Charlottesville VA Local2Global Advocates for Justice Kansas City KS Local Matters Columbus OH Long Island Cares Inc The Harry Chapin Food Bank Hauppauge NY Los Jardines Institute The Gardens Institute Albuquerque NM LTV Productions Corp Saugus MA Maine Rural Partners Orono ME Maria Hines Restaurants Seattle WA Maryknoll Affiliates Mexico Silver City NM Maryknoll Society Ossining NY Maternity of Mary Church St Paul MN Michael Fields Agricultural Institute East Troy WI Michigan Food and Farming Systems East Lansing MI Michigan Land Use Institute Traverse City MI Michigan Young Farmer Coalition Troy MI Minnesota Food Association Marine on St Croix MN Mississippi Association of Cooperatives Jackson MS National Catholic Rural Life Conference Des Moines IA National Family Farm Coalition Washington DC National Hmong American Farmers Inc Fresno CA National Latino Farmers and Ranchers Trade Association Washington DC National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition Washington DC National Young Farmers Coalition Tivoli NY Native American Task Group Sisters of St Joseph St Paul MN New Mexico Acequia Association Santa Fe NM New Mexico Food and Agriculture Policy Council Santa Fe NM North American Farm Alliance Windsor OH North Carolina Association of Black Lawyers Land Loss Prevention Project Durham NC North Carolina Environmental Justice Network Tillery NC North Coast Opportunities Ukiah CA Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance Deerfield MA Northeast Organic Farming Association Interstate Council Stillwater NY Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York Rochester NY Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group NESAWG New Paltz NY Northern New Mexico Stockmans Association Espanola NM Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides Eugene OR Northwest Farm Bill Action Group Seattle WA Northwest Michigan Food Farming Network Traverse City MI NY Small Scale Food Processors Association New York NYC Foodscape New York NY OFARM Inc Brussels WI Office for Human Dignity Catholic Diocese of Joliet Romeoville IL Office of Social Justice Christian Reformed Church in North America Grand Rapids MI Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association Columbus OH Oklahoma Black Historical Research Project Oklahoma City OK One in Ten San Diego CA Operation Spring Plant Inc Oxford NC Oregon Tilth Corvallis OR Organic Consumers Association Finland MN Organic Valley La Farge WI Paradigm Permaculture Coalition Prescott AZ Pearlstone Center Reisterstown MD Pesticide Action Network Oakland CA Place Matters San Joaquin Valley Fresno CA PLBA Housing Development Corporation Gainesville AL Practical Farmers of Iowa Ames IA Pululu Farm Arroyo Seco NM Rio Grande Community Development Corporation Albuquerque NM Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield Illinois Springfield IL Rooted In Community Berkeley CA Rural Advancement Foundation International USA Pittsboro NC Rural Advancement Fund Orangeburg SC Rural Coalition Coalicion Rural Washington DC Rural Development Leadership Network New York NY Sacramento Hunger Coalition Sacramento CA San Diego 1in10 San Diego CA San Diego Community Garden Network SDCGN San Diego CA San Diego Hunger Coalition San Diego CA San Francisco Urban Agriculture Alliance San Francisco CA San Luis Valley Local Foods Coalition Alamosa CO School Food FOCUS National Office New York NY Sembrando Semillas San Luis San Luis CO Sharon L Yeago LLC High Springs FL Silas H Hunt CDC Texarkana AR Silver Lake Conference Center Sharon CT Single Payer New York Ithaca NY Slow Food California Sacramento CA Slow Food Orange Count Laguna Beach CA Slow Food USA New York NY Social Concerns Office Diocese of Austin Austin TX SOLAR Chapparal NM South Valley Regional Association of Acequias SVRAA Albuquerque NM Southeastern African American Farmers Organic Network SAAFON Savannah GA Southern New Mexico Small Farmers Coop Chamberino NM Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group Fayetteville AR St Austin Catholic Parish Austin TX St Leo Catholic Church Tacoma WA St Luke s Church Bronx NY St Mary s Food Pantry New York NY St Raphael Parish Social Ministry East Meadow NY Surco El Paso TX Sustainable and Organic Agricultural Resources SOLAR Chaparral NM Sustainable Economic Enterprises of Los Angeles SEE LA Los Angeles CA Sustainable Living Project Potsdam NY Sustainable Living Systems Victor MT Taos County Economic Development Corp Taos NM TCTS Global LLC Dickens IA Texas Mexico Border Coalition San Isidro TX The Cornucopia Institute Cornucopia WI The Global Action Research Center San Diego CA The Jacobs Cushman San Diego Food Bank San Diego CA Tilth Producers of Washington Seattle WA Town of Atrisco Grant Merced Atrisco NM Torres Farm Taos NM Union of Concerned Scientists Cambridge MA United Farmers USA Manning SC Victory Garden Foundation Berkeley CA Victory Gardens San Diego San Diego CA Virginia Association for Biological Farming Lexington VA Visiones Photography Media Communications Albuquerque NM Walker Memorial Baptist Church Bronx NY Washington State Farmers Market Association Seattle WA Washington Sustainable Food Farming Network Mount Vernon WA West Side Campaign Against Hunger New York NY Western Center on Law and Poverty Los Angeles CA Western Organization of Resource Councils WORC Billings MT Western Sustainable Agriculture Working Group Austin NV Wholesome Wave Bridgeport CT WhyHunger New York NY Wild Farm Alliance Watsonville CA Winston County Self Help Cooperative Louisville MS Women Food and Agriculture Network Ames IA Workers Collaborative Chicago IL Working Families Party Irvington NY World Farmers Inc Lancaster MA Letter to Congress Equity Amendments for a Fair 2013 Farm Bill May 29 2013 OEFFA Testimony Comments and Sign On Letters Lauren This Letter is sent on Behalf of the Undersigned Groups For more information contact Lorette Picciano Rural Coalition at lpicciano ruralco org or 202 628 7160 Katherine Ozer National Family Farm Coalition at kozer nffc net or 202 543 5675 Y Armando Nieto Community Food and Justice Coalition at yanieto cafoodjustice org or 510 547 1547 May 23 2013 Dear Senator As the Senate considers the Farm Bill on the Senate floor we write to express our support for passage of a full and fair 2013 Farm Bill that will increase economic opportunity for the nation s diverse family farmers farmworkers rural and urban communities and Indian Tribes protect the environment and ensure proper nutrition for all families and communities We the undersigned organizations have recommendations for the farm bill that extend beyond the specific issues in this letter but we focus here on equity considerations We support a full and fair package that balances any reductions across all areas of the Farm Bill mitigates disasters especially for the most vulnerable producers protects natural resources enhances equity and inclusion constructs a new and economically viable future for agriculture and rural communities and assures healthy food for all consumers As written the bill under debate S 954 saves 24 2 billion The Committee originally committed to saving 23 billion Two of the amendments 1055 and 1088 listed below would direct 210 million of the additional and unexpected savings to the programs listed below The total savings for the bill would still exceed 24 billion and these amendments would make a small but significant investment in our diverse producers new generation farmers and the growing food systems in rural and urban communities across our country We ask you to co sponsor and vote for the following still pending amendments to restore funding for critical programs charged with serving chronically underserved segments of agriculture and the food system and make additional policy changes to improve rural development local food systems urban agriculture including programs serving Indian Tribes socially disadvantaged beginning and veteran producers and farmworkers while assuring healthy food for all We urge Senators to SUPPORT the following priority amendments Udall NM Heinrich NM 1055 Socially Disadvantaged and Veteran Producer Training SUPPORT The Outreach and Assistance Program for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers and Veteran Farmers and Rancher also known as the 2501 Program is a historic program that provides competitive grants to educational institutions Extension and community based organizations to assist African American American Indian Asian American and Latino farmers and ranchers in owning and operating farms and participating in USDA programs The committee passed bill expands program eligibility requirements to include veteran farmers and ranchers and funds this program at 10 million annually about half of previous funding The amendment would restore funding of 17 million annually in order to serve both the traditional and new producers now eligible for the program Udall NM Heinrich NM 1045 Receipt for Service SUPPORT This amendment adds authority to require the issuance of a receipt for service or denial of service to any current or prospective participant in USDA programs serving farmers and ranchers as operated by the Farm Service Agency the Natural Resources and Conservation Service and in any other USDA program directly serving producers In a time of tight resources a receipt for service will help assure that all farmers and ranchers receive clear information on programs available to them and what they need to do to access them and verify that information has been provided Udall NM Heinrich NM 1048 EQIP Community Irrigation Association Language SUPPORT The amendment defines eligible community irrigation associations and would allow USDA to make alternate payment arrangements so members of irrigation associations including acequias could receive support for conservation practices through their association so long as the payment limit for any individual producers in the association is not exceeded This would allow NRCS to do a single contract for an irrigation wide community project rather than a series of individual producer contracts for the same project Udall NM Heinrich NM 1049 EQIP Irrigation Water Saving SUPPORT This amendment would strengthen in the requirements Environmental Quality Incentives Program EQIP to assure producers who use EQIP funds for irrigation not only to improve their irrigation systems but also to achieve true water savings This would ensure that USDA payments for irrigation efficiency also generate water conservation benefits such as enhanced in stream flow and water storage Seeking Sponsor Expansion of the Substantially Underserved Trust Area Initiative with USDA Rural Development SUPPORT This amendment expands the Substantially Underserved Trust Area SUTA Initiative in USDA Rural Development Rural Utilities Service to all programs under Rural Development The amendment will improve access to family housing and community facilities financing and business and economic development funding providing RD with added flexibility to invest in individuals businesses and organizations developing private sector jobs and local economies in rural trust land communities Brown OH Tester MT Heinrich NM Schatz HI Gillibrand NY Reed RI Wyden OR Cowan MA 1088 To Encourage Food And Agriculture Market Development Entrepreneurship And Education SUPPORT This comprehensive amendment provides much needed funding and a few important technical policy changes to a handful of key programs that support development of a more resilient food system These changes and the funding the amendment provides make strides towards aligning our agriculture health and economic policy in ways that ensure farmers get a fair price for their product all Americans have access to affordable healthy food and that both contribute to strong communities and a thriving economy The amendment increases mandatory funding in the Community Food Program from 5 million to 10 million per year in the Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program to 15 million in mandatory funding over the life of the farm bill and in the Value Added Producer Grants Program from 12 5 million to 20 million per year in the Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Program from 20 million to 30 million per year and in the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program from 20 6 million to 23 1 million in FY2014 and to 25 6 million per year in FY2015 FY2018 In the Business and Industry Loan Program it modifies the existing set aside for loans for local food enterprises to eliminate a burdensome third party labeling requirement to clarify that project priorities include creating new market opportunities for farmers increasing good food access in underserved communities and supporting comprehensive regional economic development strategies and to provide flexibility for USDA to reduce barriers to participation Casey PA Harkin IA 986 Microloans SUPPORT The amendment would authorize micro lending opportunities within the Department of Agriculture by creating a new simplified loan category within the Farm Service Agency s direct operating loan portfolio If adopted this provision would authorize USDA s Farm Service Agency to make small loans up to 35 000 The new loan program would be funded out of the existing direct operating loan portfolio and would streamline the application process to facilitate participation This amendment would also give FSA discretionary authority to establish a cooperative lending program to allow USDAselected intermediaries such as non governmental or community based organizations state departments of agriculture and economic development councils to make microloans to eligible borrowers Tester MT Public Breeding for Food Security SUPPORT Farmer access to seeds and breeds adapted to their regions and specific farming and market needs is paramount to fostering the competitiveness of agriculture and ensuring future national food security This amendment would designate conventional breeding for public cultivar and breed development as a high priority research area within the Department of Agriculture The amendment would also remove hurdles that have hindered USDA s efforts to address this need including establishing a unified definition to ensure public breeding research is being funded through USDA Leahy VT Collins ME EQIP Organic Initiative Payment Limit Elimination SUPPORT This amendment eliminates the separate payment limit for farmers participating in the EQIP Organic Initiative so that all farmers are subject to the same payment limitations in EQIP Grassley IA and Brown OH 969 Special Counsel for Livestock Competition SUPPORT This amendment establishes an Office of Competition and Fair Practices headed by a Special Counsel for Competition Matters for the purpose of investigating and prosecuting violations under the Packers and Stockyards Act and coordinating antitrust enforcement between the U S Department of Justice Federal Trade Commission and the U S Department of Agriculture USDA Agriculture is one of the most consolidated sectors in the U S economy but the federal antitrust and competition oversight of the food and agriculture sector is fragmented with uncoordinated oversight shared among USDA the U S Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission The lack of coherent jurisdiction is further complicated by the increasing vertical integration in the sector where some firms and combinations of firms require monitoring by more than one agency The Grassley amendment creates a USDA special counsel on agricultural competition to coordinate and oversee competition and antitrust enforcement activities among the federal agencies Rockefeller WV Tester MT and Johnson D SD Prohibiting Retaliation Against Farmers Who Speak Up SUPPORT It has become common for livestock and poultry companies to retaliate against contract farmers who speak up about abusive contracting practices The amendment clarifies that it is a clear violation of the Packers and Stockyards Act for companies to retaliate against farmers for exercising their legal rights such as talking to federal agency officials or members of Congress about their farming operations and contracts It would prohibits meatpackers from taking any kind of retaliatory action against livestock producers who speak out and would put an end to the ongoing actions by meatpackers who retaliate against producers who complain to federal agencies and to their members of Congress Tester MT 971 Requiring An Annual USDA Report On Concentration In the Agriculture And Food Industries SUPPORT Despite the dramatic concentration of the agriculture and food sectors USDA lacks comprehensive sector wide and timely information about the overall state of competitiveness in the agriculture and food sector from seed to supermarket The Tester amendment requires USDA to collect information on the consolidation levels throughout the food and farm sector and issue an annual report to the House and Senate Agriculture Committees that includes statistics relating to the four largest firms in agriculture markets Enzi WY Johnson SD 982

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  • OEFFA News | Ecological Food and Farm News | Page 6
    poll results can be found at http policy oeffa org gepoll Farm trend watcher has high hopes for Ohio farmers in the new food movement March 2 2015 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren By Vivian Goodman WKSU 2 20 15 One of the nation s leading agricultural journalists is sounding a hopeful note for Ohio s small family farmers Alan Guebert s syndicated column The Farm and Food File appears in 70 newspapers in the U S and Canada For more than two decades he s covered the rise of factory farms the growth of the organic sector and the push and pull between industrial and sustainable agriculture The first foodies Guebert grew up on an Illinois dairy farm in the 1960 s While we did not know it then we were the original foodies These younger people you know how they want to eat They want to eat today like we used to because we ate from our farm to our table We just did it right there on the farm And we were locavores before anybody invented the word And my point is for generations for centuries we ve eaten this way We got away from it just this past generation All I really do is watch things I got a good set of eyes and I just watch those trends like that And we re just going back to where I was 50 years ago And I can t wait Guebert delivered an upbeat keynote address at this past weekend s annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association His audience was mostly small farmers committed to sustainable agriculture They use organic methods and sell directly to consumers from their farms or at farmer s markets Sales growth Sales of organic produce increased more than 11 percent nationwide to 35 1 billion in 2013 the fastest growth in five years The organic sector is still just 4 of the overall food market but Guebert sees it continuing to grow I think it s the sky s the limit Why Because he says we re living in revolutionary times Fast food empires are fading and more Americans are asking for good safe healthy food There s going to be more and more effort on the part of people who seek out good food who will pay more for good food We do it now Look at the growth of farmers markets And if you ve ever shopped at a farmers market you can buy food cheaper elsewhere If you ve ever gone to a farm to fork table restaurant You can buy stuff a lot cheaper than that But you can t buy it any better You can t buy it any healthier You can t buy it and have more satisfaction And I think that s what the new food movement is about Last year about 80 percent of U S consumers bought organic at least sometimes And there s been explosive growth in the number of farmers markets But Guebert says conventional farmers try to downplay it I read just this past week how organic farmers markets must be worried because they only grew 8 last year where in the past they ve averaged 12 and 16 years ago there was 16 growth Wouldn t the corn and soy bean farmers love the fact that their markets grew 8 last year Of course they would So that s big Ag s message to counteract the great story that we see in farmers markets and in the growth of organic sales We re just going back to goodness Good easy straight forward uncomplicated delicious food Where Big Ag comes in But is anybody holding us back from going back What about Big Ag what about Big Food Well they would like to have a real impact on current food trends And in fact they re really trying Big Ag would like to see those choices limited And by that I mean they don t want labeling They don t really want GMO labeling for sure because they say it will work against them Well prove it Prove it Until then I think giving consumers the right to know what they re eating is important Guebert s been watching the trends for a long time He s been writing his column for about 22 years now When did he see the light bulb go off in people s heads When did this happen this food revolution I think we ve worked very hard my generation your generation to be sure that our children are very well educated And we raised them to be independent Well what we raised were smart kids We raised them in a manner that they were curious and questioning and that they sought out what they thought was good options and made informed choices That s all they re making They re making informed choices They re looking at food and they re going Well I think I ll have green beans tonight and I ll go to the farmers market He s seen it in his own family His daughter lived in D C and shopped at the Eastern Market on Capitol Hill It was on her way home so she could always stop and pick up something for supper that was fresh And in fact that s how they still do it in all of Europe You go to Europe the refrigerators are about the size of your suitcase And why Because they don t store food like we do They go to the store for food They don t store it Changes in the way Americans shop for and think about food and the growth of sustainable agriculture fuel Guebert s optimism about the future of the food system but he still worries about the power of Big Ag to influence government policy If you re going to have a subsidized system yeah the small farmer the sustainable farmer out here is going to have one hell of a bad time But if they can just get people to eat their food they ll have a customer they ll have a friend and they ll probably have a salesman for the rest of their lives So I think that s what sustainable people rightly focus on where food and people meet where they interface where they can taste tomorrow And the way farm writer Alan Guebert sees it tomorrow is yesterday OEFFA workshops help promote farmer skills February 19 2015 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren By Chris Kick Farm and Dairy 2 17 15 GRANVILLE Ohio If you wanted to learn something new about farming or food production the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association conference had you covered More than 100 educational sessions were presented Feb 14 15 at the conference in Granville Ohio which covered such things as field crops livestock specialty crops business and marketing decisions and farm policy Sessions were led by everyone from small scale part time producers to full time farmers and university researchers Beginning producers Ben Jackle of Mile Creek Farm in New Lebanon talked about what it takes to get started growing vegetables for profit He and his wife Emily have grown vegetables and flowers in the Dayton area since 2007 Many decisions must be made when starting a produce farm but Jackle said it all comes back to the soil Good soil means considering the chemical biological and physical properties Jackle said Biologically producers need to build soil organisms and organic matter Chemically they must balance and supply the necessary mineral nutrients and for good physical properties they need to install the right drainage to reduce erosion Beyond soil producers need to learn some of the farmer skills that it takes to grow a crop Jackle and his wife did not grow up on a farm so they ve been learning things like painting welding drilling and cutting record keeping and maintenance Even if these things aren t things that are necessarily interesting or something you yourself want to learn you re going to have to be hiring someone to do these things Jackle said because they need done Producers also need to consider whether they want to scale up their production or stay at the same size and become more efficient Raising livestock Choosing the right scale was one of the key points in a presentation about how to raise and manage livestock Jesse Rickard and Chelsea Gandy assistant managers at Fox Hollow Farm in Knox County discussed practical and innovative methods for raising livestock For Fox Hollow some animals like the farm s 300 sheep and 100 beef cattle are raised on a production level while other things like the farm s two dairy cows raised for milk are kept on a homestead level Rickard said farms can have a combination of production and homestead ventures and even a few experimental ventures if they so choose Fox Hollow Farm is nearly 300 acres and includes 180 acres of managed pasture The farm also produces chickens and pigs Livestock on a grazing operation require less infrastructure and to a great extent the animals manage on their own and that includes nutrient recycling Animals are basically employees if you manage them correctly Gandy said If you use them right you can really get them to build your soil fertility build your organic matter and they just do a fantastic job In addition to deciding what animals to raise livestock producers need to think about equipment needs water availability nutrition marketing labor and safety of farm workers These are all things that will make or break your operation Gandy said Good record keeping is also a must and so is being profitable Sustainable farming is only sustainable if we can continue doing it Gandy said Awards OEFFA presented its stewardship award to Bill Dix and Stacy Hall of the Brick Dairy Farm of Athens County The award recognizes outstanding contributions to the sustainable agriculture community In 1992 Dix and Hall started Big Rumen Farm a 300 acre pasture based dairy farm in Athens County with a small herd of Jersey heifers and a milking parlor In the years that followed they joined a regional network of dairy farmers known as Prograsstinators which in conjunction with Cornell University helps producers compare financial information to improve the management and profitability of grass based dairy operations John Sowder of Franklin County received the Service Award which recognizes outstanding service to OEFFA Sowder served on OEFFA s board of trustees from 1992 until 2015 including multiple terms as treasurer He lends catering skills to OEFFA by helping to organize farm to table events and OEFFA s conference meals which are locally sourced and made from scratch Breakthrough in varieties make organic apples easier to grow in Ohio February 19 2015 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren By Debbi Snook Cleveland Plain Dealer 2 16 15 GRANVILLE Ohio Having trouble finding an organic apple grown in Northeast Ohio You re not alone Most are from the state of Washington clear across the country Yet apples grown in our soils and shaped by our weather happen to taste better If we could buy organic versions more easily we could also support our local farm economy Apple scab is the main reason for the lack a fungal infection that thrives in more humid climates and leaves apples disfigured Most scab is controlled by chemicals that do not meet standards for organic certification But there s new hope to increase organic apple production in our region and two of its proponents are orchardists Don Kretschmann and Tim Gebhart from Rochester PA about 40 miles southeast of Youngstown The farming duo appeared at the recent 2015 OEFFA sustainable food conference and said there are a lot of reasons to start growing organic apples at home and on a commercial farm Here are five of them More scab resistant varieties are on the market Gebhart listed a few of his favorites Pristine yellow tastier than most early apples Liberty MacIntosh style flavor Crimson Crisp a good keeper Gebhart s favorite and Gold Rush flavorful keeps in refrigeration for many months Each is resistant to scab and many other diseases and there are more hybrids like them coming out each year Some of their favorite sources Cummins Nursery near Ithaca N Y and Adams County Nursery near Gettysburg PA The duo recommends dwarf rootstocks for easier access and spreading the roots fully when planting not curling them into place More information on growing organically is available Cornell University recently released its Organic Apple Production Guide available online The two farmers also recommend the web site and books by New Hampshire organic orchardist Michael Phillips which can also be found online More supplies are readily available Organic apple growing still requires lots of specific soil conditions serious pruning good drainage and foliar spraying to fight off pests and diseases that like fruit as much as we do A list of certified organic suppliers can be found online Surround a mudlike organic pesticide sprayed on trees to fight plum curculio that causes fruit drop is available at Ohio Earth Foods in Hartville 330 877 9356 More is known about the harm caused by conventional pesticides and herbicides Beyond effects on human health they can kill the very beneficial bacteria and other microorganisms that provide a biologically healthy soil web Find more information in the sources previously listed Also commercial growers might consider the duo s technique for warding off deer Setting up a 6 000 volt wire around the orchard attaching an occasional metal mesh covered in peanut butter Once the deer get shocked said Kretschmann they rarely come back More people want organic apples Krestchmann admits that also means more education Organic apples can look as pristine as grocery store apples but that is not always the case Still they sometimes get three times the price for whole apples by the bushel compared to the same amount they once used only in cider The education is worth it he says I can produce quality fruit to an educated customer he said I always say that using a paring knife to trim unwanted parts of the fruit are always better than using chemicals Chemicals you can t pare off Guebert tells OEFFA members big ag is unsustainable February 19 2015 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren By Chris Kick Farm and Dairy 2 16 15 GRANVILLE Ohio Bemoaning the ways of big agriculture and many of the trade groups that represent it Illinois writer and columnist Alan Guebert encouraged a return to affordable sustainable agriculture during his keynote address Feb 14 at a state meeting of organic and sustainable farmers Twenty fifteen is going to be a big year both for sustainable and a big year for unsustainable agriculture he told a crowd of about 1 100 people at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association annual conference held at Granville schools On the unsustainable side he expects farmers will continue to face steep financial burdens How sustaining is it to plant a 350 bag of seed corn on 10 000 an acre ground with a 250 000 tractor he asked Government support The only way such farmers will sustain their operations he said is with tax breaks and subsidies including government subsidized crop insurance The way they farm won t succeed and in fact on its own it s never going to succeed he said Throughout American history American agriculture left to its own devices has produced itself smack dab into poverty Aside from the financial challenges Guebert said modern farming practices are destroying fertile soil which results in 400 billion in lost food production every year American farmers and ranchers are going to have to change he said noting that all generations of farmers have had to change in order to survive But some things don t change like the demand for good tasting food that is fresh safe and high quality he said He recalled growing up on his family s crop and dairy farm in southern Illinois when most of their food came from within 10 miles of their home farm The term junk food was unheard of people were thinner and healthier and there were more neighbors and neighborhood businesses Original foodies Guebert said he and his rural neighbors were foodies long before the movement began With almost perfect ignorance we ate from farm to table he said adding Our farm to our table He said some of the things big ag is promoting like its claim of feeding the world and producing the safest food supply in the world are myths He pointed to recent salmonella cases and foodborne illnesses as proof Guebert said corporate agriculture tries to tell people what to think when it should be informing them about the facts Challenging ag If left unchallenged big ag s message would be to sit down eat and shut up according to Guebert Guebert has definitely been a challenger throughout his career which has mostly centered around ag journalism and a syndicated column called the Farm Food File which is carried by Farm and Dairy Many of his columns are critical of large farm organizations and government leaders and commodity checkoffs especially the National Cattlemen s Beef Checkoff which he faults for not doing a proper job of auditing its spending His brother Richard Guebert has taken a different approach to farming Richard is president of the Illinois Farm Bureau and now serves on the national Farm Bureau board organizations that Alan Guebert criticizes for promoting myths and misinformation Guebert said the kind of agriculture he expects to survive is that which is sustainable betting against things like genetically modified organisms and certain soil amendments If I was to bet on the food production scheme most likely to succeed in the next 50

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  • Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association (OEFFA) Good Earth Guide Product Search
    Rankin Raubenolt Valley Farm Profile Lakeville OH Ashland Chad Raubenolt Certified Organic by OEFFA Raven Rocks Profile Beallsville OH Belmont Donald Hartley Certified Organic by OEFFA Redde Hedde Farms Profile Delaware Ohio Delaware Rob Rehm Reidel s Urban Farm Profile Cincinnati OH Hamilton Nathan Reidel Reinhart Farm Profile Bowling Green OH Wood Greg Reinhart Certified Organic by OEFFA Renaissance Pastures Profile South Vienna OH Clark Benjamin Hirt Rider Landing Profile Deshler OH Wood Kenneth and Nan Rider II Certified Organic by OEFFA Ridgway Hatchery Profile LaRue OH Marion Micky Ridgway Rock Dove Farm Profile West Jefferson OH Madison Todd Schriver Rock Valley Run CSA Farm and Greenhouse L L C Profile Auburn Township OH Geauga Kathy Franks Rolling O Farm Profile New Weston OH Darke Mike Osterloh Certified Organic by OEFFA Root Down Acres LLC Profile Springfield OH Clark Missy Kroninger Rootstown Organic Farm Profile Rootstown OH Portage William Pennell Rose Ridge Farm Profile Waynesburg OH Carroll Deanna and David McMaken Certified Organic by GOA Rosey Acre Homestead Profile Springfield Ohio Clark Brad Teena Rose Roy s Processing Profile Yale MI non ohio Jen and Brian Certified Organic by OEFFA Rudolph s Rabbit Ranch and Waterfowl Farm Profile Centerburg OH Knox Mary Frances R Bartels Rush Creek Gardens Profile Piqua OH Miami Kristie Fisher Rustling Oaks Farm Profile Richwood OH Union Dave and Barbara Kaelber Sackner Farm Profile Fenton MI non ohio Ray Persia Certified Organic by OEFFA Sage Organics Profile Genoa OH Ottawa Elizabeth Bergman Salem Road Farms Profile Liberty IN non ohio Brent and Suzie Marcum Salomon Gardens Profile Grass Lake Michigan non ohio Salomon Jost Sandy Rock Acres Profile Rockbridge OH Hocking Christina Wieg Sassafras Farm Profile New Marshfield OH Athens Ed Perkins Scenic View Farm Profile Dundee OH Holmes Ray Mast Certified Organic by OEFFA Schacht

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  • Farmer will discuss raising chickens at home | OEFFA News
    said Ashmore suggests starting out small with a flock of about 10 chickens The basic starter kit involves a small heated structure for the chicks until they re about three weeks old Then a permanent outdoor structure is recommended encircled by fencing but allowing the chickens have enough room to move about In eight to 10 weeks the chickens will be ready for slaughter or in the parlance of farmers processing It s not an entirely rosy scenario Ashmore said Some people have to get over an initial queasiness factor and there is an odor when the chicken carcasses are lowered in hot water to remove feathers It s not necessarily less expensive to do it at home the investment translates into about 2 per pound but the benefit is in the quality of the product Ashmore said It also satisfies the needs of a locavore or someone who values locally grown and raised food products Ashmore said It s all in your hands he said A lot of people want to get back to knowing how it s raised what they re eating and how it s processed The OEFFA conference will include 95 workshops and more than 100 speakers from all facets of the farming industry The conference offers a mix of farmers agricultural experts and out of state talent said Lauren Ketcham spokeswoman for Clintonville based OEFFA The conference will be held at the Granville High School and Middle School complex 248 Newbury St The farm association expects to draw 1 100 people which would be the largest audience yet Ketcham said OEFFA will accept registrations until the conference is sold out For more information or to register visit oeffa org 2013 Post navigation New Store Becomes Resource For Urban Farmers Cooperative Organic Farming is Helping Ohio

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  • Food Safety and Grazing Pre-Conference Workshops Offer Information for Experienced Farmers: Feature Chris Blanchard and Troy Bishopp | OEFFA News
    than 26 years He contract grazes certified organic dairy replacements and grass finishes beef on his fifth generation New York family farm Bishopp is also a grassland conservation professional with the Madison County Soil and Water Conservation District the Upper Susquehanna Coalition and the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education NE SARE Professional Development Program as well as a free lance agricultural writer I ve found real value in building profitable environmentally friendly grazing strategies and tricks of the trade through good planning observation using my noggin remaining flexible and sharing these experiences amongst other farmers said Bishopp Both pre conference workshops will take place on Friday February 15 from 10 a m 4 p m at Granville Middle and High schools 248 New Burg St Granville OH Pre registration is required The pre conference workshops are offered as part of the state s largest sustainable food and farm conference on February 16 17 an event that draws more than 1 100 attendees from across Ohio and the Midwest and has sold out in advance the past three years In addition to the pre conferences this year s conference will feature keynote speaker George Siemon on Saturday February 16 keynote speaker Nicolette Hahn Niman on Sunday February 17 more than 90 educational workshops a newly expanded trade show a fun and educational kids conference and child care area locally sourced and organic homemade meals and Saturday evening entertainment To register or for more information about the pre conference workshops or the conference go to www oeffa org 2013 About OEFFA The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA is a statewide grassroots nonprofit organization founded in 1979 by farmers gardeners and conscientious eaters working together to create and promote a sustainable and healthful food and farming system For more information go to www oeffa org Conference and Pre Conference Registration To register or for more information about the conference including maps directions workshop descriptions speakers and a schedule go to www oeffa org 2013 For additional questions contact Renee Hunt at 614 421 2022 Ext 205 or renee oeffa org The 2010 2011 and 2012 conferences sold out in advance so early registration is encouraged to avoid disappointment Artwork and Images For the conference art image or speaker photographs contact Lauren Ketcham at 614 421 2022 Ext 203 or lauren oeffa org For photographs of the 2012 conference go to www oeffa us oeffa conference2012photos php Press Passes and Interviews with Keynote Speakers OEFFA offers a limited number of press passes to members of the media who would like to attend one or both days of the conference We can also help members of the press schedule pre conference interviews with our keynote speakers To arrange an interview or request a press pass contact Lauren Ketcham at 614 421 2022 Ext 203 or lauren oeffa org Event Calendar and Public Service Announcement The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s OEFFA will be holding its 34th annual conference Growing Opportunities

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  • Author and Rancher to Keynote Ohio’s Largest Sustainable Food and Farming Conference: Nicolette Hahn Niman to Explore Connections between American Diet and Industrial Agriculture | OEFFA News
    Instead of being fed antibiotics and slaughterhouse wastes these herbivores ate grass the food their bodies were designed for instead of a feedlot pen or metal crate they roamed across the open range and took afternoon naps in the sun instead of artificial insemination they courted and mated naturally gave birth and raised their young according to their instincts They lived in a way that I was not only comfortable with I was proud of she continued Hahn Niman is also an accomplished author and speaker who has been featured in Time Magazine The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times She is regular blogger for The Atlantic and has written for The San Francisco Chronicle Huffington Post Cowboys Indians and CHOW Her keynote address sponsored by Chipotle Mexican Grill is titled Eating as We Farm And Farming as We Eat and takes place Sunday February 17 at 2 45 p m Hahn Niman will explore how a shift from grass fed diversified and small scale farming to concentrated industrial monoculture production methods have led to food overproduction declining farm income and fewer farms While the industrialization of the food system fueled by farm policy over the past half century has resulted in cheap food it has also caused an increase in diet related diseases overeating and environmental pollution She will offer a vision for a path forward that would improve both the American diet and our broken food system For more information about the conference or to register go to www oeffa org 2013 About OEFFA The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA is a statewide grassroots nonprofit organization founded in 1979 by farmers gardeners and conscientious eaters working together to create and promote a sustainable and healthful food and farming system For more information go to www oeffa org Conference and Pre Conference Registration To register or for more information about the conference including maps directions workshop descriptions speakers and a schedule go to www oeffa org 2013 For additional questions contact Renee Hunt at 614 421 2022 Ext 205 or renee oeffa org The 2010 2011 and 2012 conferences sold out in advance so early registration is encouraged to avoid disappointment Artwork and Images For the conference art image or speaker photographs contact Lauren Ketcham at 614 421 2022 Ext 203 or lauren oeffa org For photographs of the 2012 conference go to www oeffa us oeffa conference2012photos php Press Passes and Interviews with Keynote Speakers OEFFA offers a limited number of press passes to members of the media who would like to attend one or both days of the conference We can also help members of the press schedule pre conference interviews with our keynote speakers To arrange an interview or request a press pass contact Lauren Ketcham at 614 421 2022 Ext 203 or lauren oeffa org Event Calendar and Public Service Announcement The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s OEFFA will be holding its 34th annual conference Growing Opportunities Cultivating Change

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