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  • The Beautiful, the Local and the Slow | OEFFA News
    capitalism can return What do poetry and capitalism have in common WT Capitalism per se may not be very poetic But there s a bit of poetry in Slow Money Poetry is a way of communicating that forces the mind to slow down It says as much about what isn t said as what is For me all of the arguments in the world all the facts in the world just like all the new technologies in the world won t get us where we need to go What we need if I can borrow some inspiration from Wendell Berry is a new kind of imagination We need to rediscover our place in the scheme of things We need to rediscover awe in the face of nature By nature I mean everything from looking up at the night sky to looking down into the soil where there are billions of microorganisms in every gram of soil This is fundamental to the life that sustains us yet we almost never pay attention to it Wendell Berry talks beautifully about how we need a new kind of imagination to reconnect to nature Poetry is about imagination MM What is the rate of return for a Slow Money investment WT There is no one rate of return for a Slow Money investment In fact Slow Money can even mean philanthropy It can be low interest loans It can be 0 money the kind of investment that Muhammed Yunus calls for Or it can be private equity The point is that we are moving in a new direction moving towards small food enterprises not because of arithmetic We are doing it for many reasons and perhaps the least of these is the arithmetic That said we can justify the move on many financial grounds as a hedge a diversification an interesting alternative to the increasingly volatile thing we call the stock market MM How do you entice investors to park their money for a long period of time WT Our job it not to entice or convince It is more about giving people permission to do something that they already want to do How many people will do it We say in shorthand that one of our goals is to have a million Americans investing 1 of their money in local food systems within a decade Both of those numbers are important It is a lot of people taking a little of their money and starting to put it to work directly in things that they understand near where they live starting with food MM Can you tell me about the Soil Trust that you plan to launch in 2012 WT The idea emerged for a nonprofit fund called the Soil Trust which would allow people to put in as little as 25 It would be a tax deductible donation but it would be an investment in the sense that those dollars would be aggregated with lots of other small donations and then it would be invested alongside Slow Money investors around the United States This capital would be used as catalytically as possible for instance to provide guarantees and co investment alongside Slow Money investing around the country Think of it as a new kind of foundation in which all of the assets are used to invest rather than to generate income that is used as grants If we are going to build a new food system and a new restorative economy we are going to need billions upon billions of dollars Where is this money going to come from Wall Street Washington Foundations Whatever they can do it won t be enough it won t be direct enough and there won t be enough of it The only place it can come from is from all of us who have a direct vested interest in the places where we live The investment returns of the Soil Trust will come back to the Trust to be re invested for the benefit of future generations It is a very forward looking compost oriented form of investing if you want to use that metaphor It is all about putting back more than we take out MM Scott Savage a Quaker farmer and a publisher of Plain Magazine from Barnesville Ohio is one of your heroes Although we can t all revoke our driver s license like he did and move in with the Amish how can we simplify our lives WT A lot of what Slow Money is about is just saying Hey Don t let somebody tell you that money has to be so complicated It gets complicated when there is layer after layer of intermediation veils of security laws and the distance between you and what you are investing in is so great that you need legions of experts to tell you where your money is and what it might be doing In 1900 of every dollar that was spent by a U S consumer on food about 40 cents went to the farmer The rest went to processors shippers retailers etc Today the farmer gets around nine cents What happened The system has become so complicated the distance between the producer and the consumers has become so great that all the steps between producer and consumer are taking more and more of our money The quality of our food and the quality of our investing both suffer So your question has the answer in it We need to simplify we need to get closer we need to get more direct we need to take back control of some of our money and in so doing reshape our food system our economy and our culture Established in 2009 Slow Money plays a catalytic role connecting investors to local entrepreneurs and money to place Since its inaugural gathering in Santa Fe 15 000 people have signed the Slow Money Principles 2 000 have become members 11 Slow Money chapters have emerged around the country

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=612 (2016-02-17)
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  • Reclaiming Ohio’s Food Sovereignty | OEFFA News
    complicated and disconnected and we need to bring money back down to earth We ve got to take some of our money out of all this stuff that we no longer understand or can manage effectively and put it to work near where we live starting with food Tasch says that means investments that support local community based food and farm businesses He says access to healthy organic food grown with sustainable agriculture practices has increased But he says it will take more than consumer demand and dollars to help local food systems succeed Also it s going to take massive amounts of investment capital because organic farmers need to get on the land they need to create their enterprises there needs to be new distribution and processing and a whole bunch of other things that require investment capital Tasch says the idea is to put money where we live behind those entrepreneurs who are already using sustainable practices So whether it be a small farmer or someone who s developing a niche brand or someone who s got a seed company or a creamery or grain mill or a distribution business there s a myriad of small businesses that create a vibrant local food system Other topics to be covered at the conference include food safety gardening livestock green living and cooking The event draws more than 1 000 visitors from across Ohio and the Midwest and has sold out in advance the past two years It will be held February 18 19 in Granville Mary Kuhlman Public News Service OH Post navigation Hoop houses extend the growing season so farmers can meet demand for local veggies The Beautiful the Local and the Slow Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=605 (2016-02-17)
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  • Joan Dye Gussow talks about why the local-food movement matters | OEFFA News
    d scream It s not the money Somebody s out there mining that chrome and in a terrible environment It was a puzzle to me after 40 years that he didn t understand what drove me I wasn t unhappy The real secret to happiness and the reason I wanted to write about it is to be a person who is happy with themselves and the world around them Somebody else is not going to make you happy What s different since your last Ohio visit A lot more people are aware of the local food movement at least for reasons of freshness and transportation costs From when I started out in the 70s to now it s stunning how much has changed It s very rewarding What will you talk about I ll probably give them a history of the movement and look at the future and how we have to be very conscious of the traps along the way What traps We have a very very very powerful food industry from seed to table It s the biggest industry in the United States They argue that nothing is wrong with the way we typically raise and slaughter animals And they have a lot of money to put that message out there in large type We just lost a major battle when the U S Department of Agriculture approved genetically modified alfalfa which was fought passionately by a huge number of people They the USDA just took all boundaries off and approved it I think it s extraordinarily dangerous If you get genetically modified alfalfa pollen spreading around and contaminating all the organic alfalfa crops organic farmers will either not be able to feed alfalfa to their animals or they ll have to give up the organic label What do you say to people who don t follow this point of view I would think that nutritional and taste benefits were obvious to people There are people who think this means you can t have an orange in winter I get a box of grapefruit every year from Texas It ships once and I use it for two months It s a wonderful winter treat It s about what you do about dinner normally Two thirds of people don t understand how well fed you can be with local food in Ohio in the winter Or how dysfunctional and dangerous our present food system is It s dangerous in terms of toxic things such as E coli scares of lettuce and in the way our standard meat system handles and slaughters animals Or to the degree to which we depend on people who make less than they can live on all the way down the chain from growers to shippers to some restaurant workers These are all minimally paid people whom we really exploit through the system The hope is that with a local food system you can watch what s going on You can be aware where food

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=229 (2016-02-17)
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  • Local food movement founder hopes it’s not a fad | OEFFA News
    American machine and chemical based efficiency meant that very little labor was being used in this country to send food to nations with a large pool of idle laborers And Americans were consuming food from distant shores as well and even distant parts of this country And that unsettled her too In order truly to know about something she determined you have to live near it and be a part of it I figured we had to have agriculture locally and in order to keep the agriculture local we had to eat what the local farmers produced she said So we have to be willing to change our diets and not depend on things shipped from across the seas I ve been playing with that idea for 35 years and I can tell you 35 years ago it was a big hit she said sarcastically It was like a piece of lead dropped into the ocean Some of my students thought I was crazy But she persevered writing such books as This Organic Life Confessions of a Suburban Homesteader and Chicken Little Tomato Sauce Who Will Produce Tomorrow s Food And she practiced what she preached growing vegetables in two long garden plots behind her house She freezes what she can and plants hardy winter vegetables such as Brussels sprouts collard greens and kale to get through the leaner months She gets fruit from a few trees including an apple tree with apples only a mother could love but they re very good if you cut out the insects And her meat bread and cheese come from upstate farmers as part of a Community Supported Agriculture arrangement an increasingly popular way for consumers to purchase their food items straight from the farmers and artisans The one treat she allows herself in the winter is to order a big box of grapefruit from Texas which her grandmother used to get for her and which she now gets for her loved ones Nature does not grow fruit in winter she said Now in large part because of her efforts there is a huge change in the amount of interest in local food It s almost a fad and I worry sometimes that it is a fad and it will end There has been a tremendous change in people s awareness There has been a tremendous spreading of the word and not just on the coasts but in the Midwest and the Ecological Farming Association There is a tremendous change but there is also a tremendous pushback The people in power are in power because they have so much money The Department of Agriculture just passed a bill eliminating restrictions on genetically engineered alfalfa Now you can plant it anywhere It is disheartening to see how the Department of Agriculture is overwhelmed by the powers that be We have a congress that has been bought by them The local food movement is growing but it still remains upscale and out of reach for

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=225 (2016-02-17)
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  • Interview: Steve Bosserman on Building a Local Economy | OEFFA News
    Bosserman of the Ohio State University USDA Specialty Crop Research Initiative Regional Partnerships for Innovation grant team He is also the president of the consulting firm Bosserman Associates and the administrator of localfoodsystems org Steve sat down with The Erie Wire and gave some insight on how the characteristics of Ohio s local food systems are being encouraged and strengthened To listen to to the interview go to http www eriewire org archives 10540 section agriculture Steve Bosserman of the OSU USDA SCRI Regional Partnerships for Innovation grant discussing the development of local food economies from collaborative research made available through a grant Photo Joshua B Pribanic Post navigation Interview Charlie Fritsch on Growing Organic Apples in Ohio Local food movement founder hopes it s not a fad Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=221 (2016-02-17)
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  • Interview: Charlie Fritsch on Growing Organic Apples in Ohio | OEFFA News
    32nd annual conference Crisp tasty high quality apples can be grown following organic practices even in Ohio if one starts with disease resistant varieties Researcher and Windy Hill Apple Farm orchardist Charlie Fritsch will offer strategies for managing insects and fungal diseases as well as horticultural concerns for both commercial and backyard orcharding Listen here to an interview with Charlie where he discusses the likelihood of commercial scale organic apple growing within the state of Ohio Post navigation Interview A Discussion on Emerging Markets for Organic Grain Feed Interview Steve Bosserman on Building a Local Economy Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=218 (2016-02-17)
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  • Interview: A Discussion on Emerging Markets for Organic Grain & Feed | OEFFA News
    Charlie Fritsch on Growing Organic Apples in Ohio Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=212 (2016-02-17)
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  • WOUB Newswatch: Christina Wieg on Meat Goat Production | OEFFA News
    13 10 Post navigation Food safety bill promises major change Comments to the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=191 (2016-02-17)
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