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  • Interview with Joel Salatin | OEFFA News
    retail outlets and even Chipotle a billion dollar fast food chain dedicated to serving sustainably raised food Joel was sponsored by Chipotle to be a keynote speaker at the 2010 OEFFA conference that took place in Granville Ohio In his speech titled Everything I Want to do is Illegal he discussed the local food movement challenge from zoning to food safety to insurance and regulatory hurdles designed and implemented to benefit industrial food models and called for guerrilla marketing campaigns and other solutions to grow access to nutritionally superior sustainably raised food Listen to the three part interview here http eriewire org 2010 02 15 erie county oh joel salatin interview part 1 Post navigation Group was at forefront of early organic movement Philanthropy Friday OEFFA Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=47 (2016-02-17)
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  • Group was at forefront of early “organic” movement | OEFFA News
    and Kentucky OEFFA organic certification is one of 55 accredited around the country Goland said and was one of the very first certifying agencies according to Hunt Group goes to bat for farmers The main thrust of the association s work Goland said is supporting its member farmers who are growing produce for local markets and helping consumers to find them The OEFFA seeks to let food producers know that being responsible and doing the right thing for human health and the ecology can still be profitable Goland said It s a different mindset she said All of this Goland added has brought greater visibility to the issue of sustainable farming and in turn made it easier for other farmers and consumers to follow in the footsteps of those already part of the movement There are broader social trends that we are working in concert with Goland said All of our work revolves around working with volunteers Hunt said We do not operate in a vacuum We have members in almost every county in Ohio said Lauren Ketcham membership services and communications coordinator for OEFFA The northwest part of the state and also central eastern Ohio are somewhat underrepresented Goland said Some members are in Indiana which has no similar organization according to Hunt The OEFFA is not formally involved in traditional efforts to preserve agricultural lands Goland said believing that the best way to preserve farms is to preserve farmers Ohio is unique however in that it boasts many substantial metropolitan areas surrounded by farmland giving those farmers a ready market for what they grow which is an aspect of the fresh organic food effort Whether we re taking full advantage of that or not is another question Goland said OEFFA has in the past had a somewhat prickly relationship with state government agencies involved with agriculture the executive director said Things have improved somewhat under Gov Ted Strickland she said She pointed to the creation of a Food Policy Advisory Council which Strickland announced at the Ohio State Fair in 2007 and the first sustainable agricultural program as major steps toward bridging the gap between government programs and the ideals of the OEFFA These are really positive signs Goland said Annual conference to be held in Granville The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s 31st annual conference Growing with Integrity Eating with Intention will take place Feb 13 14 in Granville The conference to be held in the town s middle and high schools will feature keynote speakers Joel Salatin and Ann Cooper as well as hands on workshops exhibitors a separate educational conference for children locally sourced meals a child care area and Saturday evening entertainment Online registration for the conference is ongoing at www oeffa org More and more people are beginning to realize that the food they can get from local farmers is fresher and better tasting than what is available in grocery stores OEFFA executive director Carol Goland said in a prepared statement

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=41 (2016-02-17)
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  • Annual Conference | OEFFA News | Page 7
    decreasing health Abraham Maslow the guy who made that neat pyramid that shows the hierarchy of human needs saw fit to put food at the base because without it we d die and thus not need anything What s interesting though is why people seem to regard eating and the impact on our health as less important than say watching tonight s Lost episode We seem content to believe that something sold as food must be good for us or else it wouldn t be for sale Apply that same reasoning to firearms and see where you get Here s another food related logic problem I struggle with I asked myself Who in America makes the big bucks Professionals right Doctors lawyers football coaches CEO s et al What do these folks have in common and why do they get paid so well They all possess a knowledge of incredibly complex concepts and the creativity to use that knowledge toward providing a unique service to the rest of us hence the big paychecks It occurred to me however that one profession is missing from the list the farmer Farmers also possess a knowledge of incredibly complex concepts and they use it creatively to provide us with food that basic human need Seems like a pretty important job right Yet farmers don t generally drive BMWs or own condos in Cocoa Beach On the contrary most farmers throughout America struggle just to break even and put food on their own tables Um This past Valentine s Day weekend my sweetheart and I attended an event that brought food issues into focus The event was the 31st annual OEFFA Conference For those of you who are unaware as I was until very recently OEFFA is the Ohio Ecological Food Farm Association Since 1979 they have committed themselves to bringing visibility to and offering support for sustainable ecologically viable agriculture and healthy eating Now to be clear I m no ostrich my head isn t buried in the sand I have a library card listen to NPR and if forced watch cable news I know what s going on But the conference not only opened my eyes a bit wider it motivated me to consider my own behavior and gave me the means to change it I found myself among a group of people who demonstrated a working knowledge of things as wide ranging as soil ecology renewable energy genetically modified organisms botanical chemistry and yes animal husbandry As a layman I was able to attend workshops in many of these areas and get exposed to cutting edge ideas that can change the current paradigm of corporate food culture At a time when issues such as health care energy consumption and economic turmoil have surged to the fore of political dialogue OEFFA seems uniquely positioned to make an impact By promoting fair treatment for farmers who grow real food and by assisting in the proliferation of local food economies the organization strives to

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=5&paged=7 (2016-02-17)
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  • Fast Action Needed to Keep Some Ohio Growers in Business | OEFFA News
    help her and other growers provide healthy food options for Ohioans There s going to be more demand and more interest as people learn where their food is coming from so we re going to need more local farmers and beginning farmers to provide these things If the funding is cut there s going to be a huge gap The Senate passed a farm bill in June but the House Agriculture Committee passed a different version of the bill in July Unless the House takes action the current farm bill from 2008 will expire Sept 30 Another program that could lose funding is the National Organic Certification Cost Share Program which Ron Meyer of Strawberry Hill Farm near Coshocton says has been a tremendous help to him He fears losing the program particularly after he s already lost nearly one third of his yield this year because of the heat and drought that have devastated farms across the Midwest We ve seen insects insects that we ve never seen before We ve had some disease problems we ve never had before and both of those are due to the weather this year While the House passed a disaster assistance bill for farmers earlier this month the Farm Bill that outlines short term and long term farm policies remains stalled Meyer is a member of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association which advocates for policies that protect and benefit sustainable agriculture Post navigation Sweet corn is a hot commodity at the mercy of the weather Support the National Organic Cost Share Program in the 2012 Farm Bill Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=861 (2016-02-17)
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  • Home> News> Press Releases Brown Announces Senate Passage of Farm Bill that Would Save Taxpayers $23 Billion While Creating Jobs and Boosting Rural Development | OEFFA News
    and the consumers who support them we are grateful to Senator Brown for his leadership which has led to a farm bill that continues to invest in organic and sustainable agriculture and bolsters the future of community markets local food businesses and working lands conservation said Carol Goland Executive Director of Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association Senator Brown s work will ensure that farmers and businesses in Ohio have access to capital and development support to build our state s rural economy The National Association of Counties deeply appreciates the Senator s bipartisan work on these common sense policy solutions in the Farm Bill said Athens County Commissioner Lenny Eliason President of the National Association of Counties Below are some provisions Brown inserted in the farm bill Protecting Taxpayers while Ensuring a Strong Safety Net for Farmers The centerpiece of the deficit reduction measures in the bill is the new Ag Risk Coverage ARC program which is based on the bipartisan Aggregate Risk and Revenue Management Act ARRM Brown authored with Sen John Thune R SD This new approach to farm risk management ends the era of fixed payments These direct payments are replaced by a market based system that relies on current crop year data market prices and actual yields making payments to farmers only when the market fails The Senate s bipartisan 2012 farm bill represents the most significant reform of American agriculture policy in decades Brown has been working to reform the farm safety net since starting in the Senate in 2006 In the 2008 farm bill he worked to include the Average Crop Revenue Election ACRE program after hearing from a Henry County farmer who attended a roundtable Brown convened ARRM builds on the ACRE program and continues this work towards a market based safety net by eliminating fixed price support programs reducing overlap with crop insurance simplifying application and administrative processes and saving billions of taxpayer dollars With this bill the era of direct payments paying farmers for crops regardless of need or market conditions is over The legislation would save more than 23 billion by ending direct payments eliminating more than 100 duplicative programs and authorizations and cracking down on fraud and abuse By eliminating direct payments and two other farm subsidy programs steps first suggested in ARRM the legislation would save taxpayers money and provide a more responsible risk management approach Under the bill farmers receive support only when they suffer a substantial loss through events beyond their control and only for crops they have actually planted Grow it Here Make it Here The Grow it Here Make it Here initiative would boost the manufacture of biobased products made with agricultural materials With more than 130 Ohio companies already producing biobased products Grow it Here Make it Here would bolster Ohio s leading industries agriculture and manufacturing Earlier this year Brown outlined how the Grow it Here Make it Here initiative would increase access to capital for biobased manufacturers improve marketing of

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=811 (2016-02-17)
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  • A Q&A on Fracking with MacKenzie Bailey of OEFFA | OEFFA News
    fluid and wastewater need to be transported to and from the site At every step of the fracking process from injection and recovery to storage and transport there is the potential for contamination of water and soil through underground fissures spills leaks and blowouts Well failures are fairly common at drilling sites In 2011 Pennsylvania levied 141 violations against Chesapeake Energy alone Of those 24 involved failures of well integrity or underground leaks Scientists at Duke University published the first rigorous peer reviewed study of water pollution at drilling and fracking operations Examining 60 sites in New York and Pennsylvania they found systematic evidence for methane contamination in household drinking water Water wells half a mile from drilling operations were contaminated by methane at 17 times the rate of those farther from gas development Land use and air pollution are also of concern Semi truck trailers transport frack fluid wastewater and drilling equipment to and from the fracking site In addition to the drill pads and compressor stations which can take up acres of land themselves roads and pipeline may need to be built The increased development has been known to elevate air pollution particularly ozone levels in rural areas CL How might those effects influence the quality and sustainability of the food from Ohio farms MB Farmers livelihoods depend on the integrity of the soil clean water and pollution free air If there is a spill leak or blowout food could become contaminated by fracking fluid or wastewater If contamination occurs on land that is certified organic that land will be taken out of organic production for at least three years and the farmer will lose that income Livestock are attracted to the salty toxic brine used in fracking and therefore are particularly vulnerable if there is contamination to soil and water According to a Food and Water Watch report in 2009 16 cattle in Louisiana died after drinking spilled frack fluids Other similar reports have been made Air pollution near fracking sites can have an impact on a farm s production For instance elevated levels of ground level ozone due to natural gas drilling as has been seen in southwestern Wyoming can lower soybean crop yields Ohio s largest agricultural commodity Other crops that can be affected by ozone include spinach tomatoes beans alfalfa and other forages Although burning conventional natural gas is known to have a lower greenhouse gas effect than burning coal or oil a 2011 Cornell University study showed that gas obtained from shale rock could actually have a greater footprint This is because the release of methane which is very potent greenhouse gas from shale rock can escape into the atmosphere This could contribute to climate disruption which leads to unpredictable growing seasons CL Does fracking have any effect on the farmers and people surrounding the farmland MB Although fracking can have positive short term economic impacts for lease signers and local businesses the long term health and environmental impacts cannot be ignored Contact

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=807 (2016-02-17)
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  • Fix our broken food system | OEFFA News
    just four companies in each sector With few national buyers farmers rarely get a competitive price for their livestock Locally there are often only one or two meat packers buying livestock Packers frequently won t buy from independent producers Big meatpackers have the power to drive down the prices farmers get for hogs and cattle Meatpackers often control and feed their own livestock exerting unfair market power over farmers These companies can buy cattle and hogs when prices are low and slaughter their own livestock when prices rise In the long term this lowers the prices farmers get for livestock allowing meatpackers to manipulate prices Low livestock prices push farmers out of business Between 1993 and 2007 according to the U S Department of Agriculture Ohio lost 8 300 hog farms three fourths of its total and 1 600 beef cattle operations or one in 10 Such losses hurt the rural economy Fewer farms support fewer feed stores equipment dealers and local small businesses Consolidation in the meatpacking industry has pushed other firms out of business as well In Ohio according to the U S Bureau of Labor Statistics the number of slaughterhouses fell by 15 percent between 2001 and 2010 The number of slaughterhouse workers and their total wages fell by nearly half Lower livestock prices are not passed on to consumers Prices of bacon and ground beef continue to rise even as farmers and workers are paid less With so few processors in the market there is no incentive for big meatpackers to share savings with consumers U S Sen Sherrod Brown D Ohio is a champion of livestock fairness issues He has defended the country of origin labeling law from attack by our trade partners He supported livestock market fairness rules that the meatpacker lobby derailed Senator

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=778 (2016-02-17)
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  • Ohio Farmers Feeling the Effects of Fracking Boom | OEFFA News
    be in jeopardy During fracking experts say wastewater returned to the surface can contain radioactive materials They add that heavy metals such as lead or mercury can contaminate the soil through spills leaks or during venting and airing Supporters say fracking could create hundreds of thousands of much needed jobs and increase revenue in the state Ohio has nearly 53 000 acres of certified organic pasture and cropland much of it in areas containing shale deposits Starline is a member of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association which represents 3 000 farmers businesses and individuals MacKenzie Bailey the group s policy program coordinator says they support a moratorium on the process because so little is known about fracking s long term effects Ohio needs strong regulations to protect our farmers and consumers from the risks associated with hydrofracking including the disclosure of chemicals prior to injection and significantly increasing transparency in the permitting process Local governments have little opportunity to speak up Bailey says adding that promoting local control of fracking is critical A few months ago Starline says many farmers in his area didn t believe fracking would become an issue for them Now he says they re being bombarded with information about the gas industry and fracking All of a sudden now we have over 140 000 acres that are being leased off by three different land groups So it came in with amazing speed and everyone wanting to jump right into it Starline says state leaders need to take a step back and evaluate environmental concerns before allowing any more drilling Mary Kuhlman Public News Service OH Post navigation Bryan store All Things Food taking organic path Battle Over Farmers Rights Against Monsanto Continues to Brew Farmers File Appeal Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=709 (2016-02-17)
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