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  • Organic Farm Groups Sue Monsanto | OEFFA News
    avoid GMOs in our fields and on our plates said Dr Carol Goland Ph D of one of the plaintiff organizations That is the inevitable consequence of releasing genetically engineered materials into the environment The challenge to Monsanto s patents rests on evidence of the negative economic and health effects of GM seed which the organic groups argue invalidates the legal requirement for usefulness under patent law None of Monsanto s original promises regarding genetically modified seeds have come true after 15 years of wide adoption by commodity farmers said David Murphy founder and Executive Director of plaintiff Food Democracy Now Rather than increased yields or less chemical usage farmers are facing more crop diseases an onslaught of herbicide resistant superweeds and increased costs from additional herbicide application In The Battle for Biodiversity Monsanto and Farmers Clash a current article in the Atlantic Anna Lappe asks Does genetic modification lead to more and better crops Or will it destroy the foundations of our food systems Corporate control of seeds and relaxed laws for biotech promotion spur innovation and productivity That may sound good Lappe writes But many other groups around the world look at the real world effects of 20 years of patent approvals and the spread of biotech crops These critics argue that corporate power over seeds has actually undermined biodiversity and food system resilience Crop biotechnology has been a miserable failure economically and biologically and now threatens to undermine the basic freedoms that farmers and consumers have enjoyed in our constitutional democracy said Murphy It is outrageous that one corporate entity through the trespass of what they refer to as their technology can intimidate and run roughshod over family farmers said Mark Kastel Senior Farm Policy Analyst for The Cornucopia Institute one of the plaintiffs He contends that Monsanto and the farmers licensing its technology should be the ones required to ensure that genetically engineered DNA does not trespass onto neighboring farmland This debate is significant Lappe contends Which side we listen to will largely determine just how well we can continue to feed the planet Although saving seeds from one year to the next is a farming tradition as old as agriculture due to Monsanto s aggressive legal action Farmers are being intimidated into not saving seed for fear that they will be doggedly pursued through the court system and potentially bankrupted detailed Kastel We must protect our world by protecting our most precious sacred resource of seed sovereignty People must have the right to the resources of the earth for our sustenance said Rose Marie Burroughs of plaintiff California Cloverleaf Farms The building blocks of life are sacred and should be in the public domain The private profit motive corrupts pure science and increasingly precludes democratic participation claimed Jill Davies Director of plaintiff Sustainable Living Systems Monsanto and the biotechnology industry have made great investments in our executive and legislative branches through campaign contributions and powerful lobbyists in Washington Kastel points out We need the court

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=255 (2016-02-17)
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  • Ohio Farmers and Growers Take on Agricultural Giant | OEFFA News
    Farm Association Darren Malhame says contamination can cause organic growers to lose their organic certifications and put them out of business He adds it s a matter that could affect the future of organic farming This lawsuit is really about protecting farmers ability and freedom to practice their art in a way that s not only beneficial for them but beneficial for society as a whole Farmers say it s nearly impossible to prevent Monsanto seeds getting into their crops because animals and wind can pick up the seed and distribute it widely Malhame charges that Monsanto has been trying to monopolize the seed market with its patents and has a history of suing farmers who say their fields have become contaminated with their genetically modified seed so he feels those who are involved in this lawsuit should be commended Standing up to an organization like Monsanto is really an act of bravery but it s also an act of patriotism because it s really standing up for the best interest of everyone who depends on agriculture to live which is all of us Monsanto has said the lawsuit is misleading and that it has never sued farmers over as the company puts it the inadvertent presence of biotechnology traits in their fields The case was filed in U S District Court in Manhattan The plaintiff organizations represent more than 270 000 members including thousands of certified organic family farmers Post navigation Sustainable Agriculture Organic Diverse and Local Organic Farm Groups Sue Monsanto Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=252 (2016-02-17)
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  • Could Alfalfa Decision Spur “Super Weeds”? | OEFFA News
    used in organic dairy and grass fed beef operations To make matters worse she says the use and overuse of Round Up has lead to the emergence of what are called super weeds The analogy here is with is the overuse of antibiotics leading to the emergence of antibiotic resistant diseases We see the same thing with herbicides and the weeds Alfalfa is the nation s fourth largest crop covering 20 million acres In Ohio many organic dairy farmers rely on alfalfa as part of their organic feed program Additionally alfalfa is often used in organic crop rotation Goland says Initially the USDA proposed planting guidelines for genetically modified alfalfa but then reversed its position Goland says contamination from use of genetically modified seed can do a lot of economic harm to farmers who are responding to the rising consumer demand for organic products The organic standards require that livestock feed for animals be 100 percent organic So that potential for contamination puts at risk the organic status of crops animals and farms She adds that some farmers try to avoid contamination from neighboring farms that use genetically modified seed by planting later in the season or using production land as a buffer which she says can also hurt their bottom line Mary Kuhlman Public News Service OH Audio available at http www publicnewsservice org index php content article 18410 1 Post navigation OEFFA Announces 2011 Stewardship Award Recipients Interview A Discussion on Emerging Markets for Organic Grain Feed Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=208 (2016-02-17)
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  • Food safety bill promises major change | OEFFA News
    have sickened thousands of Americans this year alone An Ohio State University study in March put the total cost of foodborne illnesses in the United States at 152 billion The researcher Robert Scharff factored in the cost of medical expenses and unemployment related to illness Foodborne illness is a serious public health problem in the United States he said More importantly Scharff s report along with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows more than 5 000 deaths a year from food related illnesses Supporters and opponents The food safety act has won the support of United Fresh Produce Association and many other marketing agencies But despite the bill s good intentions its critics say they fear small farmers and family run businesses will be at a disadvantage The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association a major organic certifier in the Buckeye state is among a host of organizations who support what is being called the Tester Amendment an amendment named after Senator Jon Tester D Mont which according to information on OEFFA s website would exempt small farm and small farm food processing facilities as well as mid sized farmers who primarily direct market their products to consumers stores or restaurants The Tester Amendment is backed by OEFFA and many other sustainable agriculture interests including National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition Both organizations have pledged to oppose the bill if the Tester Amendment is not included On the flipside large marketing organizations like United Fresh Produce have pledged their own opposition if small farmers are granted an exclusion Real battle United Fresh is calling the exclusion of small farms an ideological concern based on speculation rather than sound science The consequences of inadequate food safety precautions have no boundaries as to size of operation geography nor whether the product is sold at a farm stand or grocery store United Fresh stated in a release The consumer has a right to know that all food that they purchase has been produced transported and offered for sale under the same food safety requirements But growers who market on a small scale including the thousands of Amish growers who produce a large portion of produce in Ohio and Pennsylvania want to know their own markets will be preserved Ohio plan OEFFA has joined hands with the Ohio Produce Growers Marketing Association to help form a set of standards specific for Ohio a three tier system that would classify producers by size of operation but subject all to similar quality inspections and standards The Ohio plan called Ohio Fresh Produce Marketing Agreement would seek to empower producers at all levels Moreover it would be seen as an effective alternative to food safety plans like California s Leafy Green Marketing Agreement which OEFFA and OPGMA both say had devastating effects on small farmers in California because it instituted overly restrictive one size fits all regulations OEFFA s Executive Director Carol Goland said she feels the bill with the Tester Amendment included is moving in the right

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=187 (2016-02-17)
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  • Farm Policy | OEFFA News | Page 7
    Food and Drug Administration FDA and some of the country s top veterinarians weighed in on the issue Some Ohio farmers feed antibiotics to their cows pigs and chickens to keep them healthy and prompt faster growth but Lauren Ketcham at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association says the practice also has environmental effects Animal waste that is produced on factory farms contains ammonia nitrates phosphorous and in many cases antibiotics When these waste products are concentrated in such high volumes and not properly disposed of these things find their way into our groundwater and our soil The FDA is suggesting what it calls judicious use of antibiotics in food animals although some people don t believe the agency s stance is tough enough A bill in Congress to restrict antibiotic use in animals except for treating diseases has 130 co sponsors including four Ohio representatives Reps Fudge Kaptur Kilroy and Sutton Ketcham says no matter what Congress decides Ohio consumers who are concerned always have a choice to buy organic Farmers and producers who sell their products with the organic label may not use drugs including hormones to promote growth and cannot sell animals or animal products treated with antibiotics as organic And the organic standards are rigorously enforced so consumers can be assured that they re getting what they re paying for The bill Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act is HR 1549 amd S 619 Posts navigation Newer posts Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=9&paged=7 (2016-02-17)
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  • OEFFA in the News | OEFFA News | Page 8
    We work with members and legislators to prevent environmental contamination by the fracking industry and make the process more transparent said MacKenzie Bailey policy program coordinator for OEFFA This is definitely an issue that is important to our members Former USDA chief Merrigan encourages organic fans to get involved in federal policy February 17 2014 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren The Cleveland Plain Dealer By Debbi Snook 2 17 2014 Kathleen Merrigan former deputy secretary of the U S Department of Agriculture told her audience at Sunday s sustainable agriculture conference in Granville that there s still a lot of hope for organic farming even with recent court losses against the use of genetically modified seeds I ve never been anti GMO Merrigan said at the 35th gathering of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association but the marketplace is demanding it She also believes organic farmers should be protected from GMO seed contamination for the financial ruin it could cause Seeds and food from such seeds are not allowed under legal definitions of organic food and proliferating use of GMO seeds on some conventional farms can put organic farmers at risk of not producing a true organic product Contamination can happen by drift at grain elevators and other ways she said Yet federal language has already been written to say the USDA can regulate whether plants can cause economic harm That language has not yet been finalized she said and organic supporters should fight for it You don t have to prove GMOs are unsafe she said You just have to show economic damage We need it as a regulation in a big way Merrigan served at the USDA for four years helping to craft federal definitions for organic food and championing the Know Your Farmer Know Your Food program with its website showing farmers and department programs across the country and the Farm to School movement s efforts to get fresh local food to students In the next few weeks she ll become a fixture in Washington D C again taking the role as executive director of the new sustainability center at George Washington University I did my time Merrigan said of her previous federal role Yet she encouraged participation in Washington with a list of Ten Reasons People Should Be Engaged in Federal Policy Advocacy makes a difference she said and has helped build food hubs and get more research done on organic agriculture Your congressional delegation rocks she said of Reps Marcia Fudge and Marcy Kaptur and Sen Sherrod Brown She encouraged the audience to continue to populate the halls of power with people who care about these issues Public comment helped modify some of the upcoming food safety regulations that would have caused hardship for some smaller farms she said You didn t even see the earlier versions she said There was a rule that farmers wouldn t spit or chew gum The government can do real harm if the regulations don t really fit the needs Merrigan reminded listeners that the USDA is not the only game in town and that gains in better food quality can come from the transportation and health departments And she encouraged more applications for governmental grant money Even if there s more competition we can all be lifted by it The number of farmers in the country is dwindling she said The USDA shows that 50 percent of farmers will be eligible for retirement soon she said and half of those intend to retire New efforts must be made to pave the way for younger farmers especially with financial help new research in the organic field tax policies and farmland preservation Having been a government employee Merrigan asked the group to stop thinking of a federal agency as a group of people with one mind There are 110 000 people working there she said Do you really believe they all think the same thing One person can make a difference she said both inside government and outside it Merrigan was introduced by Bruce McPheron who is in his second year as dean of Ohio State University s College of Agriculture While it s rare to have such a high ranking Ohio agriculture official at the organic conference McPheron promised he d be more visible to the group Ohio is an incredible place to be engaged in the food system he said And we re all batting on the same team hoping to provide abundant healthy and safe food to support Ohio and America Ohio sustainable agriculture conference feeds many appetites February 17 2014 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren The Cleveland Plain Dealer By Debbi Snook 2 16 2014 The definition of organic food may be food grown without pesticides herbicides and other controversial chemicals but talking about organic food involves a whole stew of additional issues That was the case Saturday in Granville where the first of Ohio s two day sustainable agriculture conference took place More than 1 000 farmers shop owners consumers chefs and university educators confronted food issues relating to job losses fracking government policy creativity and health The news of drought situations in California where many plantings are on hold for a lack of water seemed to heighten the purpose of the event inextricably tied to the concept of raising food locally But the overriding issue was knowledge as keynote speaker Atina Diffley petitioned farmers to take their status as heroes among local food lovers and become leaders educating consumers about land stewardship and working for policy change Her own court victory against an oil pipeline planned to run through her organic farm augmented by thousands of letters from her consumers led to a change in language in Minnesota law that declared an organic farm could be seen as equal to a sensitive environmental area Now Wisconsin and New York are looking at it she said of the language Preceding Diffley s talk a stewardship award program opened the door to an anti fracking statement including a roll out banner calling for an end to pushing natural gas out of the ground with deep chemical injections In the audience was one of last year s stewardship award recipients Mardy Townsend a grassfed beef farmer from Ashtabula who has been fighting fracking waste wells in her county where she fears it may affect the groundwater she uses to feed her animals Saturday s and Sunday s schedules are packed with at least a dozen choices per session including growing Shiitake mushrooms learning food safety regulations and starting honeybee colonies Members of Our Harvest the Cincinnati food hub talked about building a worker owned local food distribution system based on a model in Mondragon Spain There are so many farmers markets we thought Why not grow enough food for schools universities and hospitals where people really need it said Ellen Vera one of the founders The group has secured more than 500 000 in local loans and started a farm subscription program that has grown over three years to include 200 customers They hope to build a coterie of local farmers to supply larger accounts Annie Warmke who lives in a classy looking house built from recycled trash and depends on water supplied from rainwater off the roof led a session about living a sustainable life Stressing family friends and community she asked attendees to think less about shopping as therapy and more about nature Once she and her husband Jay chose a lifestyle without traditional jobs they turned their home near Zanesville into a teaching lab for raising goats and solar power installation classes Marissa Kruthaup of Morrow a recent graduate of the University of Kentucky outlined the experiment she did with a 5 574 federal sustainable agriculture grant comparing eight types of sweet corn varieties through organic and conventional methods Her results showed that consumers could not taste the difference but that using the organic chicken manure fertilizer gave her higher yields and produced less pollution than conventional fertilizer Urban farm consultant Brad Masi of Oberlin screened his new film Network Theory an affectionate look at the growth of the local food movement in Athens southeast Ohio Principals of the town s local food web which includes a commercial kitchen worker owned restaurant Casa Nueva and grain and bean growers cooperative Shagbark Mill talked about the necessary sense of community in local food Food naturally brings everyone to the table said one Weaving a network from that doesn t mean you have to love each other or hang out together all the time It just means that by working together you can do something bigger and more fabulous than working alone Annual conference teaches sustainable farming February 17 2014 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren The Newark Advocate By Joe Williams 2 16 14 GRANVILLE Katrina Bush visited Granville s middle and high schools Saturday to learn about beekeeping using herbs for medicine and community supported agriculture Bush raises chickens eggs and produce on her 30 acres near Mount Sterling She works full time for the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities in Columbus but hopes to retire soon and expand her agricultural efforts On Saturday she attended the 35th Annual Conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association to learn about sustainable food and farming I just went to a bee workshop That s my next thing she said Bush recently slaughtered her hens which were getting too old to produce eggs but she will accept delivery of 27 more early next month She raises them mostly for their egg production for herself family and friends but doesn t make much money off them for now She grows produce in her garden and donates the excess to her local food bank She sets aside 14 acres as a quail habitat On Saturday between workshops Bush browsed the exhibits in the Granville Middle School gym and spoke with vendor Charles Prince about raising barley sprouts during the winter to help feed her chickens Prince of Granville co owns Do It Yourself Sprouts which sells sprouting trays racks timers and related equipment Prince s partner Amish dairy farmer Robert Mast of Charm uses the system to feed his cows barley sprouts during the winter Customers use the sprouts to feed their goats sheep trophy deer and chickens Prince said To date the vast majority of our customers are Amish Prince said because you don t need electricity Prince and Mast started the company in 2012 Prince said to feed cows during the winter when forage is unavailable An Amish farmer in Holmes County makes the molded trays for them While Mast only grows sprouts through April Prince said other farmers can grow them year round using air conditioning to control the growing temperature and humidity to protect against mold The value of sprouts during the summer is considerably less than during the winter because of the availability of pasture Prince said Carson Combs and his wife Dawn co owners of Mockingbird Meadows near Marysville attended this weekend s conference selling their products and hosting workshops Carson maintains 35 beehives while Dawn an herbalist uses the honey for spreads and herb infused honeys They also make and sell wound cleaners bug repellants and poison ivy kits You can take a spoonful of honey instead of taking a pill or tincture Carson Combs said A lot of people don t want to take pills Their business is now full time Carson formerly worked as a city planner in Dublin Dawn worked in information technology for Chase Bank They sell their products year round at farmers markets and at their farm where they also teach classes For us it goes back to Hippocrates and your food should be your medicine Combs said The conference continues from 9 a m to 3 p m Sunday with a variety of workshops including Cooking and Eating GMO Free Meals Food Safety and Post Harvest Handling and Solar Electricity for the Very Very Beginner Presenters come from across Ohio and several other states Organic activist Atina Diffley to speak at Ohio food and farm conference January 31 2014 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren By Debbi Snook The Cleveland Plain Dealer 1 31 2014 Old MacDonald had a farm and a whopping good story to go with it Atina Diffley had a farm and she believes that every organic farmer needs to find his or her own stories and sing them aloud Here s one of hers When plants in her Minnesota greenhouse became infested with damaging aphids she noticed one of her field crops was covered with ladybugs the aphids natural enemies She trucked her aphid infested plants out to the ladybug area and let them sit overnight In the morning the aphids had been devoured It s the classic story of integrated pest management she says one of the hallmarks of organic solutions No pesticides were necessary Diffley wants organic farmers to use stories like this to help make the world healthier and less chemical dependent Diffley 54 will be the keynote speaker Friday Sunday Feb 14 16 at the annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association or OEFFA the state s leading organic advocacy group and one of its major farm certifying agents The conference draws hundreds of attendees to Granville southeast of Columbus with nearly 100 talks and workshops with topics that range from growing and marketing to making a living from small scale organic farms and gardens Diffley spent decades as a farmer and wrote books about it including Turn Here Sweet Corn Organic Farming Works University of Minnesota Press 2012 part romance with her husband and co farmer Martin part war legally with a utility trying to run a pipeline through her land and part organic creed She has since left farming for work as a consultant and advocate The organic movement is a small part of agricultural America but its sales are growing much faster than sales from conventional farms Even the supermarket industry is predicting organics will have a 14 percent growth over the next five years Diffley spoke by phone about the optimism and proper storytelling necessary for the organic movement to pick up greater speed and meet what she calls greater needs She misses farming she says but I wanted to be feeding people through their minds Why do farmers need to be organic advocates I really want farmers to recognize their role as a connection between the land and the people who eat their food They really have this opportunity to activate the people they re feeding toward making policy changes We are a hero culture and eaters are interested in what the farmers are doing The way we eat is really important and we need to take the next step Agriculture is 40 percent of our planet and the leading cause of habitat degradation species extinction and greenhouse gases that lead to climate change When you change agriculture you make all the difference in the world How so exactly Organic farms statistically sequester 15 percent to 28 percent more carbon than conventional farms That s significant That s equal to hundreds of thousands of cars off the road Instead of bringing in fertilizer from off the farm you re growing it on the farm by building soil health Organic farms change the hydrology of their soil and they change where the water runoff goes If you add 1 percent of organic matter to the soil an acre can hold an extra 16 500 gallons of water That also will get you through six weeks of drought The service provided to the community by an organic farm goes beyond food Another is the practice of biological diversity on a farm which supports pest and disease management and the protection of native pollinators We take trees and wildlife for granted but we cannot survive without them We can survive without our computers but not without nature Who should farm It s not for everyone You have to like being outside You have to have some tolerance for physical discomfort and you have to have good stress management skills I encourage anyone to take a look When we were farming people would show up every year wanting to work for us One said he definitely wanted to have a farm but never did Other people said they were doing it because they didn t know what else they wanted to do And they became farmers People should just go and try it They should go work for someone else s farm or multiple farms and at places bigger than they ever want to be If you re going to make it you have to learn systems of economy I ve seen high quality farms not make it because they couldn t figure out that when they said they d be at a meeting at 7 a m they needed to be there at 7 You ve got to know how to be in a business relationship and how to repair those relationships I see people with a marketing background thriving as farmers and growing more quickly than those who don t have that background You ve talked in your book about running away from home at 17 being in an abusive marriage and finally stepping out of the victim role I was caught in a situation where I let other people define me But you can t be 50 and living as a 2 year old would see the world When I see people acting irrationally I think that what they re doing is going back to their hurt 2 year old self It s nice if you can get professional help or find friends to catch you when you re stepping out of reality thinking you re not smart enough strong enough or good enough One of my best gifts was being able

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=3&paged=8 (2016-02-17)
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  • Lauren | OEFFA News | Page 8
    of Sustainable Agriculture and Senior Scientist at the Center for Food Safety in Washington D C He is the founding co director and former science director for the biotechnology project at the Center for Science and the Public Interest From 2006 to 2014 he served as senior scientist in the food and environment program at the Union of Concerned Scientists Previously Gurian Sherman worked at the Environmental Protection Agency where he examined the human health impacts and environmental risks of genetically engineered plants He also worked in the biotechnology group at the U S Patent and Trademark Office and he served on the Food and Drug Administration s inaugural advisory food biotechnology subcommittee He is a respected scientist widely cited expert on biotechnology and sustainable agriculture and author of dozens of articles papers and reports including the landmark Union of Concerned Scientists report Failure to Yield Evaluating the Performance of Genetically Engineered Crops In addition to Gurian Sherman this year s conference will feature syndicated agricultural writer Alan Guebert on Saturday February 14 nearly 100 educational workshops three in depth pre conference workshops on Friday February 13 a trade show activities for children and teens locally sourced and organic homemade meals and Saturday evening entertainment The OEFFA conference will be held at Granville High School 248 New Burg St in Granville For more information about the conference or to register go to www oeffa org conference2015 Past conferences have sold out in advance so early registration is encouraged to avoid disappointment Some Ohio Communities are Not Pleased About Proposed Pipelines January 19 2015 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren Ohio Public News Service By Mary Kuhlman 1 8 15 COLUMBUS Ohio Dozens of Ohioans including farmers are teaming up to fight pipeline projects that could run through their property Almost 40 000 miles of new pipelines are being proposed around the state to transport oil and gas Sheryl Billman is working to get organic certification for her Lorain County farm which is in the proposed path of the Nexus pipeline It s just a whole devastating idea a 42 inch diameter pipeline says Billman It would only be anywhere from two to six feet below ground You couldn t put trees in you could not use the land really Besides the impact on agriculture Billman says the local public benefit of the development is questionable since the pipeline would transport natural gas from shale gas supplies produced in eastern Ohio up to Canada Groups are forming to try to get the pipeline it rerouted to areas where existing pipelines already are in place The Nexus pipeline is in early planning and its developer has said it is possible it could be moved or its path could be shifted It s not just the pipeline that Billman says is a nuisance but also its construction maintenance and accompanying compressor stations She says the possibility of accidents spills or explosions poses a real risk to organic farmers whose land could be compromised by chemicals or toxins The people who are close to these things their air quality water quality and soil is just being devastated says Billman That s food and it comes up in the food and it just draws right from the soil and from the air Supporters say the pipelines will help drillers get a better price for their gas by carrying it to areas north where there is greater demand While Billman says she understands the need for natural gas for energy she says there are other ways We know how to do things differently and there are the alternative fuels coming along solar and wind primarily and we are taking our farm in that direction she says We will be petroleum free on our farm by 2020 Other proposed projects in Ohio include ANR East Pipeline a 500 mile line to Michigan and the 800 mile Rover Pipeline which would run to Canada Genetically Modified Crops Continue to be Controversial January 14 2015 Annual Conference Farm Policy OEFFA in the News Lauren All Sides with Ann Fisher 1 14 15 Ohio farmers have now joined a nationwide lawsuit against a Swiss agriculture company for selling genetically modified corn before it was approved by China a major corn importer Ann explores the larger issue of genetically engineered crops the concerns over health and environmental risks and the role they play in feeding the world with guests Ellen Deason professor at the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law Doug Gurian Sherman Director of Sustainable Agriculture at the Center for Food Safety and Featured Keynote Speaker at OEFFA s 36th Annual Conference on Sunday February 15 Douglas Southgate professor in the Department of Agricultural Environmental and Development Economics at The Ohio State University Listen to the hour long conversation here Award Winning Journalist to Keynote Ohio s Largest Food and Farm Conference Alan Guebert to Discuss Future of Farming January 7 2015 OEFFA Press Releases Lauren FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 7 2015 Contact Renee Hunt Program Director 614 421 2022 Ext 205 renee oeffa org Lauren Ketcham Communications Coordinator 614 421 2022 Ext 203 lauren oeffa org Award winning agriculture journalist Alan Guebert will be a featured keynote speaker at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s OEFFA 36th annual conference Sustainable Agriculture Renewing Ohio s Heart and Soil on Saturday February 14 in Granville Ohio Licking County For more than 20 years Alan has had his finger on the pulse of American agriculture offering keen insights into the politics money and technology behind our nation s food and farm system said OEFFA Program Director Renee Hunt Guebert will speak as part of the state s largest sustainable food and farm conference an event which draws more than 1 200 attendees from across Ohio and the country In his Saturday February 14 keynote address presented by Northstar Café Farming s Future Faces Shaping the Course of Our Food System Guebert will explore the ways in which science technology

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?author=2&paged=8 (2016-02-17)
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  • Conference to Look at the Future of Food and the Risks of Genetic Engineering: | OEFFA News
    drift storage transportation and processing GE crops have also been linked to pest and weed resistance and the increased use of pesticides and herbicides Recent consumer polls indicate consumer distrust of GE technology and the desire to have GE food labeled What we constantly see is a failure of the media and of policymakers to really say The problem here is industrial agriculture Kimbrell told Organic Connections They want us to see these events as scary isolated incidents instead of indicators of how dangerous and unsustainable our industrial food system has become The sleight of hand is to try to treat each incident in its own isolation and not understand that they re all connected to the larger systemic failures and problems of industrial agriculture Kimbrell is author of 101 Ways to Help Save the Earth The Human Body Shop The Engineering and Marketing of Life Your Right to Know Genetic Engineering and the Secret Changes in Your Food and general editor of Fatal Harvest The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture His articles on law technology social and psychological issues have also appeared in numerous law reviews technology journals magazines and newspapers across the country and he has been featured in many documentary films including The Future of Food In 1994 Utne Reader named Kimbrell one of the world s leading 100 visionaries In 2007 he was named one of the 50 people most likely to save the planet by The Guardian U K All events will take place at Granville Middle and High Schools 248 New Burg St in Granville Pre registration is required Cost for the conference is 115 for OEFFA members and 175 for non members and meals must be purchased separately Prices vary for late registrations students and one day only registrations Go to http www oeffa org conference2012 php for more information or to register online and receive 5 off the registration fee About OEFFA The Ohio Ecological Food Farm Association OEFFA is a state wide grassroots non profit organization founded in 1979 by farmers gardeners and conscientious eaters working together to create and promote a sustainable and healthful food and farming system For more information go to www oeffa org Conference and Pre Conference Registration To register or for more information about the conference including maps directions workshop descriptions speakers and a schedule go to http www oeffa org conference2012 php For additional questions c ontact Renee Hunt at 614 421 2022 Ext 205 or renee oeffa org The 2010 and 2011 conferences sold out in advance so early registration is encouraged to guarantee a spot Artwork and Images For the conference art image or pictures of keynote speakers contact Lauren Ketcham at 614 421 2022 Ext 203 or lauren oeffa org For photographs of the 2011 conference go to http www redplanetwd com oeffa conference2011 php Press Passes and Interviews with Keynote Speakers OEFFA offers a limited number of press passes to members of the media who would like to attend one or both

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=621 (2016-02-17)
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