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  • OEFFA Press Releases | OEFFA News | Page 9
    to more than 310 reflecting the tremendous growth in demand for locally sourced and sustainably produced foods said OEFFA Executive Director Carol Goland The Good Earth Guide aids consumers interested in buying wholesome local ecologically produced food and helps ensure the future of Ohio s farmers by helping to increase public awareness of the food being grown in their community You can find just about anything you d want being made right here in Ohio By offering this guide we hope to help Ohioans make the connections they need to find quality local foods and to help ensure the future of a vibrant sustainable food system said Goland Each farm listing includes name and contact information products sold a farm description whether the farm is certified organic and where their products are sold Both the print and online versions include tools that make it easy to search the listings for a specific product farm or farmer by county or by sales method The Good Earth Guide helps provide a blueprint for consumers interested in eating locally and in season Eating locally allows consumers to get to know who raises the food they eat and to find out how it was produced It keeps produce from traveling far distances allowing it to be picked and sold ripe and full of flavor and nutrition Buying locally and directly from the farmer also helps keep our food dollars in the local economy which in turn helps to preserve Ohio s vanishing small farm families farmland and traditions concluded Goland The Good Earth Guide is available free to the public in an easy to use online searchable database at http www oeffa org search geg php The Ohio Ecological Food Farm Association OEFFA is a non profit organization founded in 1979 by farmers gardeners and conscientious eaters who committed to work together to create and promote a sustainable and healthful food and farming system For more information go to www oeffa org For more information about OEFFA or the Good Earth Guide go to www oeffa org or contact Renee Hunt at 614 421 2022 Ext 205 or renee oeffa org Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board Implementing Legislation and Board Appointments Fail to Protect Small Family Farmers September 24 2010 OEFFA Press Releases livestock care standards board small farmers Lauren Press Release For Immediate Release Contact April 8 2010 Carol Goland Ph D 614 421 2022 Ext 202 cgoland oeffa org Columbus OH A picture of how the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board will function is starting to develop following the passage of implementing legislation and this week s appointment announcements from Governor Ted Strickland On March 31 Governor Strickland signed into law implementing legislation authorizing the creation of the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board After legislators balked at the idea of a fifteen cent per ton tax on animal feed to fund the Board s operating costs Senate Bill SB 233 was amended to require that the Board s initial costs be funded

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=4&paged=9 (2016-02-17)
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  • Sense of Place | OEFFA News
    Snapper s among others The two also currently own My Catered Table a meal home delivery service The experiences have prepared them for the launch of their first full scale restaurant and has informed Heirloom s menu which is simple but rich Breakfast options which are served all day include sweet rolls homemade granola and yogurt egg sandwiches with cheddar cheese served on wheat sourdough buns baked in house and the eye opener burrito consisting of eggs potatoes chorizo and cheddar cheese served on a wheat tortilla The three quiche options spinach and feta bacon and Swiss and a quiche of the day stand alone or come with a side of fresh fruit or greens Prices for breakfast items range from about 2 to 7 25 The lunch menu consists of a handful of salads and sandwiches The spirugala salad of spinach arugula cranberries toasted pecans and goat cheese is priced at 8 The big salad of mixed greens arugula pasta broccoli sunflower seeds raisins carrots and cucumbers with a white balsamic and maple vinaigrette dressing is 8 25 The Gila monster headlines the sandwich menu It s a combination of turkey meatloaf green chile pepper jack cheese and Southwestern aioli Heirloom is serving Luna vegan burgers and a peanut butter banana and honey sandwich as well They range in price from 5 75 to 9 Ingredients come from Ohio businesses such as nuts and peanut butter from Krema and coffee from Stauf s both of Grandview Heights goat cheese from the Blue Jacket Dairy in Bellefontaine and oats cereal and grains from Stutzman Farms in Millersburg I m a firm believer that local is not only trendy but becoming more and more of a necessity John Skaggs said He likes being able to shake hands with the people who

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=461 (2016-02-17)
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  • Sidewalk Sustainability: The Crazy Genius of Edible Lawns | OEFFA News
    than they could keep up with In the summer Sandman said they are swimming in tomatoes and peppers In the spring she never needs to buy salad greens The growers get more than free food they get food that tastes better than any they could buy That s the biggest downside of the garden it makes everything bought in the store taste not nearly as good said Sandman Rooney agreed She was surprised to learn how different naturally grown celery tastes from the grocery store variety Rooney s yard grown celery is dark green flavorful and not stringy at all When folks only have access to grocery store produce Sandman said it s no wonder that people hate vegetables Developing a sustainable ecosystem with the land one has available is not a new idea the couples pointed out It was a no brainer for their farming ancestors and now it s a no brainer for them It s funny to look around the neighborhoods now and think that little slope on that little lawn would be the perfect place to just let strawberries go crazy Collins said I don t know why the front yard is considered to be some mostly barren place where only grass is allowed to make an appearance Yet the permaculture concept is not without controversy This summer for example Julie Bass of Oak Park Michigan reportedly faced about three months in jail for growing vegetables in place of her lawn Although her garden was contained in raised beds her neighbors reported it as an eyesore The local government contested her yard needed suitable live plant materials instead such as grass flowers and shrubbery Fortunately for Bass the charges were eventually dropped And fortunately for the folks on Como Avenue the feedback they ve cultivated has

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=457 (2016-02-17)
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  • Environmental & Agricultural Success at Marshy Meadows | OEFFA News
    than 30 years and are devoted to making their farm work economically and ecologically After getting her master s degree in agronomy from Ohio State University Mardy set goals for Marshy Meadows that included assessing the topography of the land and finding the best agricultural fit for the rambling collection of hills wetlands and valleys All of the farm is classified as wetland or highly erodible Mardy told me It didn t make sense to keep tilling up highly erodible land Mardy chose to abandon the production of crops and began converting fields to grasslands Previously erosion had been a problem on the hilly areas of the farm Grassland holds everything in place and provides prime real estate for the grazing of cattle Since 2002 the Marshy Meadows herd has grown to around 130 head of the Hereford Angus cross Black Baldies This past spring was a good calving season with 33 calves born without losing a single one Converting Marshy Meadows Farm to grassland has been good for the environment in Ashtabula County and provides a way for Mardy to make a living from what she loves farming Over the past nine years she has only had to work at off the farm jobs twice as she s built her business Her grass fed beef is also becoming popular in the region Through the good work of the Geauga Family Farmers Cooperative it has even made its way onto the table at the Cleveland Clinic Work is nearly complete on Marshy Meadows new water system EQIP has been a part of that success Funding for a system to deliver water to different pastures around the farm has been supported by EQIP grants From the policy point of view USDA wanted to help beginning farmers and those willing to be more environmentally conscious with how they use their land From Mardy s point of view she has been able to get needed infrastructure onto the farm much more quickly than she could have without USDA support Implementing a new environmentally friendly practice can be costly and not affordable based on the cash flow of an operation EQIP helps farmers over this economic hurdle Mardy said Marshy Meadows also is in the eighth year of a ten year grant program with the Conservation Stewardship program This is another USDA program that helps defray the costs incurred by using environmentally friendly practices The grasslands of Marshy Meadows supports thriving bird populations of eastern meadowlark and bobolink both of which are in danger due to loss of habitat CSP payments make up some of the farm income lost by protecting these ground nesting birds habitats However Townsend is worried about what she s hearing from Washington regarding Congressional budget cutting and just where the budget axe may fall Her concern is that across the board draconian cuts at USDA are going to shut down EQIP making it difficult for farmers to continue to implement environmentally friendly practices at the necessary rate Also CSP

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=452 (2016-02-17)
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  • Lessons for locavores: Ohio cooking expert explains how to make the most of local products | OEFFA News
    teach at a local cooking school I recognized that people had a lot of basic questions about the food they eat said Suszko who lives in Vermilion Ohio along Lake Erie Maybe we had to start relearning the way we were eating The book divides food into seasons asparagus in the spring green beans and cucumbers in the summer pears apples and tomatoes in the fall Suszko includes how to choose the best produce and store it as well as how to prepare it with more than 150 recipes from Cucumber Salad With Cilantro and Peanuts to Chilled Cantaloupe Soup She lists items other than produce to be found nearby eggs maple syrup specialty grains And finally she tells how to preserve foods in season through freezing or canning to be consumed later New locavores Jones said should consider such a strategy More people have an interest in cooking for right now getting dinner on the table he said But we re just starting to see them ask themselves How do I extend the seasons Doing so Suszko said is crucial to eating locally Make that part of your repertoire during the growing season she said putting away some of the food we enjoy now so we can enjoy it in the middle of winter when we miss the flavors of homegrown The Locavore s Kitchen represents a labor of love for Suszko also the author of Farms Foods of Ohio From Garden Gate to Dinner Plate Instead of talking to farmers and food producers as she did for her first book she relied on her experience as a home cook specializing in locally grown foods The challenge for her she said involved the writing The hardest part was trying to keep it concise she said I only had so

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=439 (2016-02-17)
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  • Farming food, reaping knowledge | OEFFA News
    college board and specifically board member David Goodman and Roosevelt s own experience in the college s admissions process last spring as he learned about prospective students I was affected hugely by seeing how the students are already driven by this issue and how they see its connection to social justice he said Identifying himself as still learning about the topic Roosevelt said he s become increasingly passionate about sustainability concerns in the six months since he began his presidency I ve had my own education It s been dramatic Roosevelt said Other colleges such as Middlebury and Sewanee offer a sustainability focus and college leaders are still determining what Antioch s specific niche will be Roosevelt said stating that because Antioch is located in the Midwest that niche will likely be food production Along with Boutis and Christen a new farm committee composed of faculty and staff has begun meeting regularly to identify ways to incorporate the farm into campus operations Students should be able to pull a vegetable out of the ground cook with it take the compost back to the garden and then study the results in chemistry class Boutis said of some of the ways the college will integrate the farm experience into campus life The farm committee is composed of assistant professors David Kammler chemistry and Lewis Trelawny Cassity philosophy Dean of Community Life Louise Smith facilities representative Ronnie Hampton adminstrative representative Joyce Morrisey and Boutis Brooke Bryan and Ann Simonson of Glen Helen Located on the 35 acre former golf course on campus the farm will be a working laboratory that provides the opportunity for active participation in learning experimenting and applying best management practices in organic and ecological agriculture methods according to a college press release Lessons learned in the fields will likely become fodder for the college s new Global Seminars that offer students interdisciplinary approaches to the study of issues around food water governance health and energy While the first quarter Global Seminar will focus on water food will likely be emphasized in winter or spring according to Trelawny Cassity Questions regarding how citizens should spend their time how food should be produced and distributed are inherently philosophical and go back to Plato he said The farm is an interesting experiment in community and local food production These are issues of political economy he said Along with its ability to incorporate the farm into many segments of campus life Antioch has other advantages compared to some colleges regarding integration of the farm as an educational experience according to Boutis First it will be located on campus rather than several miles away And while some schools struggle with aligning their students calendar years with a farm s growing season Antioch s first class of students will have a spring campus based co op when farm needs are high and will also be on campus during their first summer We have some options other schools don t have regarding the growing season Boutis

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=423 (2016-02-17)
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  • Organic Poultry Farms Have Fewer Drug-Resistant Bacteria, Study Finds | OEFFA News
    out to be caused by a strain resistant to several antibiotics Bacteria resistant to antibiotics can make their way to humans through the meat itself and the environment like waterways contaminated with runoff If humans ingest those bacteria or are exposed to them other ways and get sick there aren t many options for treating them Several European countries have already banned the prophylactic or preventative use of antibiotics for exactly this reason and some studies there have shown that once farmers reduce antibiotic use those resistant microbes mostly go away But that s been difficult to study in the U S since the majority of farmers still use antibiotics pretty indiscriminately So Amy Sapkota an assistant professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Maryland and lead author of the study decided to look at 10 mid Atlantic farms that had just adopted organic practices She measured the change in levels of enterococci bacteria against 10 mid Atlantic conventional farms Enterococci can show up in poultry litter feed and water The researchers tested their resistance to 17 different types of antibiotic drugs We were surprised to see such dramatic differences in the levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the very first flock at these organic farms Sapkota tells Shots For one common antibiotic erythromycin 67 percent of an Enterococcus bacterium from conventional poultry farms were found to be resistant while 18 percent were resistant at the organic farms But Sapkota notes that organic farms usually still have reservoirs of resistant bacteria that can linger in the soil or the packed dirt floor of the poultry houses so they may never be completely free of the bugs But Sapkota s work does not mean organic poultry eaters get a free pass when it comes to food safety No chicken

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=418 (2016-02-17)
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  • Food Ark | OEFFA News
    is of wheat In 1845 spores of the deadly fungus began spreading across the country destroying nearly all the Lumpers in its path The resulting famine killed or displaced millions Current efforts to increase food production in the developing world especially in Africa largely bypassed by the green revolution may only accelerate the pace at which livestock breeds and crop species disappear in the years to come In pockets of Africa where high yield seeds and breeds have been introduced the results have been mixed at best Countries like Zimbabwe Zambia and Malawi ended up sacrificing much of their crop diversity to the monocropping of imported high yield varieties subsidized by government programs and provided by aid organizations Small farmers and pastoralists have gone deep into debt to pay for the inputs the fertilizers pesticides high protein feeds and medication required to grow these new plants and livestock in different climate conditions They are like addicts hooked on a habit they can ill afford in either economic and ecological terms One response to the rapidly dwindling biodiversity in our fields has been to gather and safely store the seeds of as many different crop varieties as we can before they disappear forever It s an idea first conceived by Russian botanist Nikolay Vavilov who in 1926 had perhaps the least heralded scientific epiphany of the modern era The son of a Moscow merchant who d grown up in a poor rural village plagued by recurring crop failures and food rationing Vavilov was obsessed from an early age with ending famine in both his native Russia and the world In the 1920s and 30s he devoted himself to gathering seeds on five continents from the wild relatives and unknown varieties of the crops we eat in order to preserve genes that confer such essential characteristics as disease and pest resistance and the ability to withstand extreme climate conditions He also headed an institute now called the Research Institute of Plant Industry in St Petersburg tasked with preserving his burgeoning collection what amounted to the first global seed bank It was on one expedition to Abyssinia now Ethiopia in 1926 that Vavilov had a vision in which he attained a vantage point high enough above the planet to see the handful of locations across the Earth where the wild relatives of our food crops had first been domesticated Afterward he mapped out seven centers of origin of cultivated plants which he described as the ancient birthing grounds of agriculture It is possible to witness there Vavilov wrote the great role played by man in the selection of the cultivated forms best suited to each area Vavilov s life story did not end happily In 1943 one of the world s foremost authorities on the potential cures for famine died of starvation in a prison camp on the Volga River a victim of Stalin who had deemed Vavilov s seed gathering efforts bourgeois science By this time Hitler s army had already closed in on St Petersburg then Leningrad a desperate city that had lost more than 700 000 people to hunger and disease The Soviets had ordered the evacuation of art from the Hermitage convinced that Hitler had his sights set on the museum They had done nothing however to safeguard the 400 000 seeds roots and fruits stored in the world s largest seed bank So a group of scientists at the Vavilov Institute boxed up a cross section of seeds moved them to the basement and took shifts protecting them Historical documents later revealed that Hitler had in fact established a commando unit to seize the seed bank perhaps hoping to one day control the world s food supply Although suffering from hunger the seeds caretakers refused to eat what they saw as their country s future Indeed by the end of the siege in the spring of 1944 nine of the institute s self appointed seed guardians had died of starvation Vavilov s ideas have been modified in the years since Today s scientists consider the regions he mapped to be centers of diversity rather than of origin because it isn t clear whether the earliest domestication occurred there first Yet Vavilov s vision of these regions as the repositories of the genetic diversity upon which the future of our food depends is proving more prescient than ever Today there are some 1 400 seed banks around the world The most ambitious is the new Svalbard Global Seed Vault set inside the permafrost of a sandstone mountain on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen just 700 miles from the North Pole Started by Cary Fowler in conjunction with the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research the so called doomsday vault is a backup for all the world s other seed banks Copies of their collections are stored in a permanently chilled earthquake free zone 400 feet above sea level ensuring that the seeds will remain high and dry even if the polar ice caps melt Fowler s Global Crop Diversity Trust recently announced what amounts to a recapitulation of Vavilov s worldwide seed gathering expeditions a ten year initiative to scour the Earth for the last remaining wild relatives of wheat rice barley lentils and chickpeas in order to arm agriculture against climate change The hope is that this mad dash scramble will allow scientists to pass along the vital traits of these rugged relatives such as drought and flood tolerance to our vulnerable crop varieties Still storing seeds in banks to bail us out of future calamities is only a halfway measure Equally worthy of saving is the hard earned wisdom of the world s farmers generations of whom crafted the seeds and breeds we now so covet Perhaps the most precious and endangered resource is the knowledge stored in farmers minds Forty year old Jemal Mohammed owns a five acre hillside farm outside the tiny hamlet of Fontanina in the Welo region of Ethiopia s northern highlands It

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=408 (2016-02-17)
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