archive-org.com » ORG » O » OEFFA.ORG

Total: 1274

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • livestock care standards board | OEFFA News
    99 USDA accredited certification agencies all which certify to the same standard the National Organic Program NOP OEFFA Comments to the Livestock Care Standards Board September 24 2010 OEFFA Testimony Comments and Sign On Letters livestock care standards board Lauren 28 May 2010 Dear Director Boggs and Livestock Care Standards Board committee members Thank you for the opportunity to submit comments for your consideration The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA is a 31 year old membership based organization of farmers backyard gardeners consumers retailers educators researchers and others who share the desire to build a healthy food system that brings prosperity to farmers helps preserve farmland offers food security for all Ohioans and creates economic opportunities for our rural communities OEFFA also offers organic certification We are one of the 99 USDA accredited certification agencies all which certify to the same standard the National Organic Program NOP It is with great concern that these comments are submitted to this board We urge you to consider and act on the following Unintended consequences for small farmers The Livestock Care Standards Board LCSB was established as a pre emptive strike against the Humane Society of the United States HSUS ballot initiative in which certain confinement practices found in large scale livestock operations would be banned The target never was small scale livestock farms or diversified farms nor organic livestock production which has its own set of humane practice standards OEFFA is concerned that attempts to avoid more restrictive regulations of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs as promoted by HSUS will have the unintended consequence of requiring additional paperwork fees and government intrusion on non CAFO farms Small diversified and organic farms are not just a niche or fringe market They are small businesses creating jobs strengthening our local economies and serving a growing consumer market for locally and sustainably raised food To let small farmers get caught up in the middle of what is really a battle between CAFOs and HSUS would be a reckless use of this board s constitutional authority This will have a substantial negative impact on several fronts The livestock producer who will see his or her costs unjustly increase due to time spent filling out forms fees for any audit a 500 annual audit fee is nothing to a 100 000 poultry confinement facility but is a heavy burden to the farm that sells two dozen eggs a week and inspector visits The Department of Agriculture which will be saddled with the increased inspection demands and paperwork process as a certifying agency offering a third party verification process we appreciate what kind of demand this is The Ohio taxpayer who will have to pay for the costs of maintaining this board and the auditing and enforcement expenses and The consumer who will see less choice at the marketplace as smaller producers decide to quit production if procedures are put in place that are financially or otherwise too onerous This is clearly not what voters thought they would be getting when they passed Issue 2 last fall Further just as farms are of different sizes they also have different practices There is no one right way to raise beef for instance In an integrated farming system how cattle are managed is much different than in a feedlot Standards that require a prescriptive use of drugs or a blanket method to house livestock would be overreaching and detrimental to the diversity of Ohio livestock agriculture Recommendation Whatever direction the LCSB takes in establishing animal welfare standards it is imperative that if it is necessary to have annual audits and to file paperwork with the State of Ohio this effort should focus on certain sized operations Our suggestion is that any operation smaller than the threshold size for the EPA s definition of a medium sized CAFO be excluded from the requirement of an annual audit Instead farms below this threshold size would be subject to inspection only when triggered by a complaint 2 A reasoned timeline to allow for good policy making While it is admirable that board members have committed so much time to gathering public feedback and meeting to work out details to furnish initial standards and rules OEFFA must point out that the timeline in which the board is working prohibits true participation by all those producers potentially affected by this board s actions Indeed with this timing many of the livestock producers we talked to question the sincerity of the board and in effect feel that going to a listening session to voice their concerns and offer feedback is a waste of time because of the fast track that this board has established Further it is nearly impossible for most livestock farmers to find the time to serve on any Technical Advisory Committees TACS or subcommittees at this time of year Farmers who grow grain for their livestock are tending to their fields diversified farms are working from sun up to sun down growing and harvesting their produce for their CSAs and to get to market The pressure to get something in place now is not coming from the public or the farmers themselves This is again a reaction to the HSUS ballot initiative The board is tasked with making very important decisions that will affect the livelihood of tens of thousands livestock producers their families and the consumers who count on them This rule making process should be thoughtful deliberate thorough and respectful of the impacts it could have on these farmers not rushed to serve a narrow political interest In short this is not the foundation for good policy making Insisting that this rule making be completed in the next few months would prevent all but big operators industry representatives and academics who are paid to be there from participating If the subcommittees fail to include the voices of small farmers their recommendations to the board will present an incomplete picture of livestock farming and could set the board up to

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=livestock-care-standards-board (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • OEFFA Comments to the Livestock Care Standards Board | OEFFA News
    wants input from the public and to have diverse representation on the subcommittees especially from those who will be impacted by this board s decisions then it will hold off establishing any kind of regulations until there is adequate time for participation and input In addition to holding listening sessions at the beginning of the process where participants are only able to make general comments and not respond to specific standards and procedures the board should develop draft recommendations gather public input and then repeat this process prior to review by JCARR Late fall through the winter offers ample opportunity for this work In this way the board can avoid any unintended impacts on farmers and ensure that these standards and regulations are thought through Ensure a transparent process Related to the previous point a transparent process needs to be established in order to offer a fair and balanced process and instill confidence in the public Information about this board and its activities is currently not easily accessible and is not communicated to the public in a timely manner Note that the LCSB webpage itself only has the statement State Issue 2 was recently approved by Ohio voters creating the 13 member Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board Much has happened since then but information on the board s makeup contact information for board and staff as well as any meeting notes are not being made available at this time Recommendation Allow public comment at the meetings including subcommittee meetings and provide an easy online form where members of the public can submit comment electronically The board s website should include meeting agendas and thorough minutes meeting announcements disclosures about finances names contact information and biographies for each board member each subcommittee member and the LCSB staff as well as other information which makes the board s activities accessible to the public In the future the board should provide more advanced notice for meetings ensuring that members of the public who want to attend have that opportunity Consumers right to choose Regulations need to protect alternative production processing and distribution models and ensure that consumers continue to have a choice about how their food is produced Consumer demand is at an all time high for grass fed beef free range poultry and pastured pork For example in 2009 while total U S food sales grew by only 1 6 percent organic product sales grew by 5 1 percent Moreover the organic meat sector is currently one of the fastest growing in the organic industry with total retail sales increasing by a factor of 46 between 1997 and 2007 We know that small farmers are especially likely to adopt organic practices as a way to improve farm income Any regulation must not be inhibit them from raising livestock that supplies these growing markets Recommendation The board needs to take special care that the regulations enacted do not squelch the growing local and alternative food movement by overburdening smaller operations or eliminating options

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=116 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • OEFFA News | Ecological Food and Farm News | Page 10
    pollution Agroecology based farming methods not only reduce water pollution they reduce or eliminate pesticide use and can reduce global warming emissions And they have been shown to be profitable and highly productive The lesson from Lake Erie is that piecemeal fixes like no till though they have some important benefits will not fix a system that is fundamentally broken We need systematic change not band aids Addendum The new paper on the sources of phosphorus pollution in Lake Erie points to manure as an important source of phosphorus in the eastern part of the Lake rather than the Maumee River basin in the western part of Lake Erie Figure 13 The Maumee River Basin phosphorus is predominantly from agriculture sources as noted in the blog post but according to the paper mainly from fertilizer the post does note that fertilizer is the overall main source of agricultural phosphorus pollution This does not affect the main points in the blog that agriculture and no till combined with heavier precipitation are major sources of increased phosphorus entering the Lake since the 1990s But it does strongly suggest that the correlation between CAFOs and the Maumee River basin is just that a correlation and not a cause From Market to Farm One couple s commitment to cultivating connections on Ohio s largest certified organic blueberry farm August 18 2014 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren Edible Columbus by Karin McKenna Summer 2014 In a matchup nearly as inspiring as blueberries and cream Phillip and Margaret Nabors well known food advocates and owners of the venerable Mustard Seed Markets are now organic farmers themselves A few miles south of Loudonville and very near the Mohican Memorial State Forest blueberry pickers have been making annual treks to Blueberry Hill Farm for 60 years In 2010 Nabors bought it For years I ve been wanting to own land Phillip explains The 66 acre property was put on the market and though he and Margaret were on vacation with only the Internet on his phone as a meager research tool Phillip saw the potential in the property The rest magically unfolded I didn t do my normal fastidious research but it just seemed right he says The text that he received from Margaret on his way to the auction must have played a large part in the decision Let the angels guide you it read Since then the large group of Nabors family and close friends the 40 Hippie Method Phillip calls it have been working very hard to clear the land of invaders grapevines poison ivy and a couple thousand trees As a result the 5 000 blueberry bushes are breathing a bit easier At any time there may be six to twenty guests visiting the land and helping out Large meals are cooked and enjoyed friendship is shared There s a pool a teepee a friendly contingent of dogs hammocks and a welcoming vibe The longtime association with the farmers with whom they work through Mustard Seed Market has made Phillip and Margaret s transition to the farming life a natural one The connection between the earth and our food supply is profound says Phillip For every bite of food there s a farm somewhere There s a profound process that s worthy of appreciation It takes a lot of effort to manage all of the forces to get food to grow out of the ground and get it to market As the land is cleared they re planting new trees Long term plans include diversifying and focusing on high nutritional value super fruits and aligning with the permaculture model They re introducing forest gardening creating a habitat for mushrooms ginseng medicinal herbs things that want to grow in the forest as Phillip says Between the forest and pasture are the paw paws persimmons and nut trees There are a lot of interesting crops that want to grow on the edges and we re going to help them along by planting them he says Obviously the food aspects of Blueberry Hill are important but the spiritual effects of the farm have become apparent as well To a person everybody who goes there feels something Phillip says We ve had some amazing experiences with our guests really connecting with this land Visitors receive explicit instructions at Blueberry Hill to taste the berries as they pick and Phillip likens the joy that comes from this to feeding our inner caveperson s primal connectivity to the earth We take the larceny right out of the equation By saying that it s okay to eat as they pick we take the guilt off the table Very often kids will come back their faces just smeared with blueberries and about 12 berries in their bucket They come back with these huge smiles It s fun for us to enable that The Nabors hands these days are quite full with Blueberry Hill and the two grocery stores Joining locations in Solon and in Montrose a third Mustard Seed Market is under construction in the Highland Square area of Akron I am incredibly excited about the store because it s not just a new store it s a new path for us Phillip shares The newest market is a smaller store in the dense neighborhood where the Nabors family has lived for 35 years on the edge of an official USDA food desert Lacking a grocery store for 15 years the neighborhood is truly hungry for its offerings and much thought is being put into how to best serve the area What s amazing is that the category of natural organic stores has evolved to where now we can do a natural organic store and serve as the neighborhood grocery store That really wasn t possible as little as 10 years ago explains Phillip With an eye toward education a value oriented mix of offerings and cutting edge green building features there is a lot of excitement about the new store which could open as early as December of this year Of course shoppers will find Blueberry Hill berries in all three Mustard Seed stores Blueberry picking begins when the berries are ripe Watch the Blueberry Hill Facebook page for the latest updates or call the farm at 740 599 5050 Blueberry Hill is located at 23038 Gessling Road in Glenmont Directions are on the website at BlueberryHillFamilyFarms com Cost Share Assistance Available for Growers and Handlers of Organic Agricultural Products July 24 2014 OEFFA in the News Organic Certification Lauren Ohio Department of Agriculture Press Release 7 22 2014 REYNOLDSBURG OH The Ohio Department of Agriculture today announced it will receive 478 600 to help growers and handlers of organic agricultural products recover part of the cost of their U S Department of Agriculture USDA certification Producers and handlers who incur expenses for obtaining or renewing their organic certification between October 1 2013 and September 30 2014 are eligible for reimbursement Payments will be up to 75 percent of an individual producer s certification costs with a maximum of 750 per certification scope crops livestock handling wildcrops Grant funding is provided by USDA s National Organic Certification Cost Share Program Approximately 11 5 million is available nationwide for organic certification cost share assistance making certification more accessible for certified producers and handlers The department is working in partnership with the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA to verify the certification of organic operations and to manage reimbursement requests Those interested in applying for cost share assistance may do so directly through OEFFA Applications must be postmarked by November 15 2014 For more information on cost share program guidelines or to apply visit http certification oeffa org costshare or call OEFFA directly at 614 262 2022 July 21 2014 Farm Policy Lauren Public News Service By Mary Kuhlman 7 14 14 Mud Run Farm in Stark County uses horsepower to reduce emissions linked to a warming climate Photo courtesy of Mud Run Farm COLUMBUS Ohio The National Climate Assessment finds climate stressors such as weeds and diseases are threatening the future of farming But the report also suggests that sustainable agriculture practices could help slow the pace of climate change Mud Run Farm in Stark County is a small organic operation Owner Alex Dragovich says changes of his farm s position in the U S Department of Agriculture s plant hardiness zone maps indicate a shift to warmer temperatures for growing And he admits there have been some changes in weather patterns impacting agriculture in Ohio The season went from very cold to warm in a short amount of time and then a lot of rain he points out Can I say that that s climate change Maybe in the long term but not in the short term It s like a chronic illness you don t realize you have it until it s too late Dragovich says his farm uses earth friendly practices that reduce carbon emissions He s cut back on the use of diesel fuels by powering his farm mostly with horses and also manages cover crops which reduce the amount of tractor time needed in the fields The National Climate Assessment found that the resiliency of the agriculture system can be increased through sustainable methods such as diversifying crop rotations integrating livestock with crop production systems and minimizing off farm flows of nutrients and pesticides Dragovich says he s hopeful the next farming generation embraces sustainable methods and considers the impact agricultural practices have on the environment I see a lot of young people taking up the organic mantra and trying to save this planet he says So hopefully these young people will be a little more respective of Mother Earth and hopefully will be better at it than my generation Recent research found organic farming methods that encourage soil health create higher yielding crops better able to cope with weather related stressors compared to conventional farming Ohio cattle ranchers rebuilding herds July 21 2014 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren The Columbus Dispatch By JD Malone 7 17 14 On Saturdays at the Worthington Farmers Market Licking County rancher John Wiley sells every piece and package of beef he brings Thanks to historic high prices for both beef and live cattle Wiley s grass fed cuts aren t cheap but that hasn t hurt his sales and he s working to produce more High prices unrelenting demand and decent weather have Ohio s cattle herds once again on the rise Buckeye ranchers added 2 percent to their stock this year over last one of the few states to do so the U S Department of Agriculture said But unlike businesses that make toys cars or computers adding production capacity at the ranch level isn t as easy as throwing up a new building or contracting with another manufacturer It s complicated by fickle markets biology and weather say Wiley and other experts Beef is a different sort of animal Americans have a love affair with beef and insatiable demand in a headwind of historic prices proves it We ve seen demand continue to increase said Darren Tristano executive vice president of Technomic which tracks the restaurant industry Consumption is up Consumers like their beef and burgers The U S beef herd has long been in decline The nation s herd size peaked in the 1990s and has lost 38 million head since It is now as small as it was in 1951 when there were half as many Americans to feed according to USDA and U S census records Recent droughts the widespread calamity of 2011 and the current rainfall deficit in the West have prompted ranchers to cull millions from their herds because they have become too expensive to feed We are starting to see signs of some hints toward expansion said Elizabeth Harsh president of the Ohio Cattlemen s Association Ohio has been fortunate We have been in a different weather pattern Beef producers are at the mercy of Mother Nature Ohio s pasture and range lands are in good shape with 93 percent in fair to excellent condition according to the USDA s latest crop report In major beef producing states such as Texas Kansas and Colorado 20 percent to 35 percent of pastures are in poor to very poor condition In California the report rated 75 percent of pasture as poor to very poor Partly because of good grazing conditions Ohio s ranchers kept more heifers young female cows to breed and are looking to grow their herds as their operations allow Harsh said Wiley has added 20 cows to his operation Up the Lane Farm through the past couple of years but he is now at capacity Wiley said his fellow ranchers struggle with the decision to cash in their cows at today s prices or hold a few back and grow a bit to see if tomorrow brings even better returns Some of these guys are more likely to hang on when the prices are up Wiley said The animals are worth so much money it is almost too expensive to turn them into meat Calves are sold by weight and weigh between 450 to 800 pounds Prices for calves in June 2013 ranged from 640 to 1 000 the USDA said This June prices ranged from 1 000 to 1 600 We keep raising our retail beef prices to keep up Wiley said But everything we do keeps costing more everything from hay and the price of calves I would say it has doubled in about five years Because of the high price of calves and low herd count fewer animals are being sent to slaughter this year the USDA said Harsh and Wiley agree that there are fewer cows at local processors If true expansion happens it ll come slowly Predictions aren t for a rapid expansion anytime soon said Stephen Boyles a beef expert with Ohio State University Extension I see interest but I m not sure I have seen a lot of action To hold back a heifer to expand a herd through breeding and raising a calf is a two to three year commitment Boyles said That is a long term investment without a guarantee that prices will remain high Just buying a calf and raising it for slaughter takes 12 to 18 months Wiley said his customers often ask why he doesn t bring more meat to the farmers market when he knows he has a strong customer base What I tell people is that the animals I have now are the ones I bought two years ago Wiley said I didn t know you d be here two years ago Checkoffs More and more of the same July 21 2014 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren Farm and Dairy By Alan Guebert 7 10 14 According to the U S Department of Agriculture there now are federal commodity checkoffs for beef blueberries Christmas trees cotton dairy products eggs fluid milk Hass avocados Honey Packers and Importers lamb mango mushrooms paper and paper based packaging peanuts popcorn pork potatoes processed raspberries softwood lumber sorghum soybeans and watermelons Let s see that s 1 2 3 whoa 22 These 22 federally mandated largely nonrefundable commodity checkoffs raise most of an estimated 750 million per year from U S farmers and ranchers to promote everything from well avocados to watermelons Wait there s more Long as that menu is however it s not the whole checkoff enchilada USDA operates another 35 or so federal commodity marketing orders and many states oversee dozens more local commodity checkoffs For example there are at least 22 state corn checkoffs for varying amounts per bushel some refundable some not that contribute a portion of their money to a coordinated national corn promotion effort Also many state beef groups either now have or are pursuing statewide beef checkoffs to add up to another 1 per head to fund state specific beef promotion programs on top of the 1 per head nonrefundable federal checkoff each beef and dairy producer already pays upon sale of their animals Combine state and national checkoff collections and it s guessed because checkoff data is not compiled that American farmers and ranchers pay 1 25 billion per year for commodity promotion and research Organic checkoff That pile will grow if the Organic Trade Association a self described membership based business association for the organic industry in North America is able to sway federal lawmakers to endorse an organic checkoff in the next two years OTA claims a checkoff would carry benefits for farmers and industry alike It sees the money pegged between 20 million and 40 million per year as a way to distinguish organic in the market place grow demand and help the consumer understand all that organic delivers Links to documents are posted at http farmandfoodfile com in the news To raise the money OTA is pushing an assessment plan it calls broad and shallow for everyone in the organic supply chain Everyone means not only producers according to OTA but also handlers brand manufacturers co packers and importers Exempted from paying any checkoff however would be organic certificate holders most players in the U S organic market must be certified organic by USDA with gross annual sales of 250 000 or less The proposed assessment advocated by OTA is 1 10 of 1 percent of gross organic revenue greater than 250 001 per year For example OTA explains there would be a 1 000 assessment at 1 000 000 gross organic revenue One sided While OTA s checkoff plan is relatively broader and cheaper than its federal siblings most organic farmers see little need for it Ed Maltby executive director of the Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance recently posted a lengthy discussion on NODPA s website on what he calls OTA s one sided propaganda campaign for the checkoff In fact writes Maltby

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?paged=10 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • OEFFA in the News | OEFFA News | Page 10
    the new council also serves small sustainable food and farming interests It s important that these farmers be a part of the conversation said Renee Hunt the group s educational program director Our food system would look a lot different if people voted with their food dollars to match their ideals The Ohio Farm Bureau however sees the council as another effort by the Humane Society to influence Ohio livestock care Farm Bureau s largest concern is that HSUS has chosen to ignore Ohio s leadership in protecting the well being of farm animals through the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board the bureau said Through the board all Ohioans have the ability to influence the rules that define acceptable farm animal care the Farm Bureau said HSUS is positioning its judgment as being superior to that of Ohio citizens Rickert a longtime sheep farmer who has diversified into natural and sustainable beef pork chickens and eggs sees the council mostly as an educational tool We have a lot of education to do he said FDA answers questions about produce safety rule in Wooster May 6 2013 Farm Policy OEFFA in the News Lauren Farm and Dairy By Chris Kick 5 1 13 WOOSTER Ohio One by one produce growers and industry representatives approached a panel of Food and Drug Administration staff Tuesday afternoon with questions about new rules coming their way About a third of the FDA s public listening session held at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center was devoted to question and answer following opening comments by FDA staff and Ohio s Agriculture Director David Daniels The new rule will meet the requirements of the broad sweeping Food Safety Modernization Act signed into law Jan 4 2011 It will make many of the current Good Agricultural Practices used on produce farms into enforceable standards Questions included guidelines for applying manure who is exempt from the rule what will it cost when will it take effect and how will it be enforced Enforcement Michael Taylor deputy commissioner for foods at FDA said the rule is for the first time setting enforceable standards for practices on farms that can affect the safety of produce Many of the practices are already being followed several producers said but the rule will make the standards a requirement Taylor and others who spoke said the focus is on setting standards that work for producers as well as consumers The first principal in all of this is that we have to confirm and rely upon the primary role that you the people that produce food play he said This is the frontline of food safety Samir Assar director of food safety staff at FDA said there will be a strong focus on educating growers how to comply including the formation of a technical assistance network on produce safety FDA has produced multiple public summaries of the legislation which growers said will be useful as they review what all is included The policy broadly covers standards for all aspects of unprocessed fruits and vegetables sold off a farm It covers such specifics as agricultural water biological soil amendments of animal origin health and hygiene animals in the growing area and equipment tools and buildings Several Amish growers attended the listening session one who said producers should be educated at the simplest level possible He reminded FDA that many of the Amish growers have only an eighth grade education I always was able to accomplish more in the form of education than in the form of regulation said Raymond Yoder of Yoder s Produce Supply in Fredericksburg Who it covers The proposed rule does not treat all producers the same Farmers who grow produce for use on their own farm would be exempt as well as those who grow and sell less than 25 000 in food annually from their farm Taylor said the exemption was heavily debated but officials ultimately decided it would not be economically feasible to enforce the standard on the very smallest of producers Producers who sell up to 250 000 of food products a year would be considered a Very Small Business These farms would have four years after the rule s effective date to comply for some of the water requirements they would have six years Producers whose sales range from 250 000 500 000 would be considered a Small Business These farms would have three years after the effective date to comply for some of the water requirements they would have five years Manure application Multiple farmers asked about the rule s standard for raw manure application which requires a nine month minimum waiting period before harvest if the manure is applied in a way that it comes into contact with the produce plants The National Organic Program sets the standard at just 120 days a much shorter period But FDA officials said they did not have sufficient science that the 120 day period was enough time However farmers were told they could apply manure whenever they wanted and till it into the ground or avoid contact with produce plants essentially with a zero day wait Animals for work Several farmers asked about using horses and other animals in the growing area Joy Johanson another FDA panelist said the main thing is that the worker minimize direct contact with covered produce while they re working with the animal Stark County produce grower Alex Dragovich specifically asked You are in no way going to eliminate us from the use of horses correct Assar assured him We are not putting forth requirements that would forbid the use of animals What will it cost The exact cost is not yet known but would depend in part on what practices the farm already is following If a produce safety plan already is in place and the equipment and facility are in good repair the burden of meeting the new rule would be lessened Two or three organic farmers said they thought the rules might be cost prohibitive and they testified that the new rules might put them out of business If the FDA does not address the cost concerns of the proposed rule many farmers may risk going out of business said MacKenzie Bailey a spokesperson for the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association But Yoder who has worked cooperatively with FDA throughout the process and invited them to his farm said most of what they want farmers to do is common sense something they can afford If they farmers tried to use common sense it won t put them out of business he said To comment You can comment on the rule electronically at the Federal Register website You can fax your comments to the FDA at 301 827 6870 or by mail at Division of Dockets Management HFA 305 Food and Drug Administration 5630 Fishers Lane Room 1061 Rockville MD 20852 Bill in Congress would help grow sustainable local farms April 12 2013 Farm Policy OEFFA in the News Lauren By Mary Vanac The Columbus Dispatch April 12 2013 Advocates of sustainable farming and regional food systems are applauding the Local Farm Food and Jobs Act a federal bill they say has the potential to expand markets for farmers and get more healthy food in the hands of consumers Sen Sherrod Brown an Ohio Democrat and Rep Chellie Pingree a Democrat from Maine introduced the twin bills in the Senate and House early this week hoping their provisions will make it into a five year farm bill later this year The lawmakers originally introduced their act in 2011 However Congress failed to agree on a new farm bill last year extending the previous bill instead Sen Brown s bill will boost income and market opportunities for Ohio farmers secure funding for critically important programs that support family farms expand new farming opportunities and invest in the local agriculture economy said MacKenzie Bailey policy program coordinator for the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association in a written statement The act has 33 co sponsors all Democrats including Sen Jon Tester from Montana the Senate s sole working farmer More than 280 organizations have endorsed the bill including Local Matters Ohio Environmental Council Slow Food Columbus and OEFFA Local and regional agriculture is a major driver in the farm economy yet producers face significant infrastructure marketing and information barriers said Ferd Hoefner policy director of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition in a statement The bill addresses those barriers and makes smart investments that expand economic opportunities for farmers increase jobs and improve healthy food access in rural and urban America Hoefner said The act offers something for each of the seven titles in the farm bill including proposals addressing crop insurance farm credit nutrition rural development research and extension horticulture and livestock the sustainable agriculture coalition said It would create an insurance program for diversified and organic farmers who grow crops that are not covered by traditional crop insurance It also would enable schools to purchase local food and food stamp recipients to spend their money at farmers markets more easily Local Matters said In addition the act invests in sustainable agriculture programs such as the Farmers Market Promotion Program that were stranded without funding when the 2008 farm bill was extended the sustainable agriculture coalition said For an investment of just over 100 million a year the Local Farms Food and Jobs Act can help a growing sector of the food system flourish Hoefner said That figure compares with 40 million for local food systems in the 2008 farm bill he said A climate of ecological farmers meet in Granville April 4 2013 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren Farm and Dairy February 19 2013 By Chris Kick GRANVILLE Ohio More than 1 100 people filled the Granville Middle School Feb 16 17 to hear about the latest climate in organics and local foods production Climate was a literal part of the discussion as multiple speakers spoke about the ways that cover crops and crop rotation can help reduce global climate change They gathered for the 34th annual Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association conference a statewide event Jim Hoorman OSU assistant professor and extension educator gave a compelling talk about all the different ways climate change could affect agriculture at all levels On the plus side he sees a longer growing season But it will likely come with increased precipitation events more insects heat and heat damage More time A longer growing season means farmers can plant and harvest later But a better solution he explained is to plant and harvest as they re doing now while adding more cover crops during the off season Cover crops are a proven way to keep soil and nutrients in place loosen soil and reduce compaction and they also are known to absorb and sequester a substantial amount of greenhouse gases one of the causes of climate change We have a tremendous ability to help moderate some of these climate events he said Hoorman said rain events are going to be more intense Instead of 1 inch rains he said to expect 2 to 3 inch rains He also predicted a continuous shrinking of the planting window which means farmers will have fewer suitable days to get in and out of fields He expects advanced tractor technology will help get things done quicker including robotically operated tractors More organic Hoorman said organic agriculture and cover crops has shown a tremendous decrease in the amount of fertilizer and herbicides needed and predicted the nation will become more and more organic as time goes on In the afternoon keynote speaker and Organic Valley CEO George Siemon discussed the success of CROPP one of the nation s largest organic farming cooperatives which he helped to found in 1988 He also talked about the challenges he still sees in the food industry The world needs changed very badly he said If you don t acknowledge something you can never fix it We ve got lots of problems in the food world and we need to address them Siemon said he and his partners started the parent company Cooperative Regions of Organic Producer Pools to provide some market security for organic producers We really felt that if we were going to have organic food we needed to have a fair price for farmers he said so they could know what they were getting paid and avoid the ups and downs of the market Under attack He said he s concerned that genetically modified organisms GMOs have gone too far and pose a threat to organic interests Siemon also challenged what he called were measured attacks on the organic industry including the claim that conventional farming feeds the world According to Siemon more people are fed by peasants and gardeners than modern conventional agriculture The peasants of the world and the gardeners of the world feed us he said He also questioned whether conventional food can really be considered safe when the U S Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration approve chemicals based on risk level not safety It s not safe he said They never will use the word safe Siemon said he s seeing more and more land go into large agribusiness use which he also criticized They re industrial farmers pushing people off the land in bringing in 12 row corn planters he said From a health perspective Siemon reminded the audience of the rising rate of obesity and life threatening diseases and the potential for good eating to lead to good health Healthy living In a separate talk Jay and Annie Warmke talked about the health and life benefits they experience from sustainable living at their Blue Rock Station a sustainable living center that encourages participants to experience a month of living without energy and money Participants cook their own meals in wood ovens learn to reuse repurpose and recycle as much as possible The Warmkes also store up food during good times so they can be prepared during difficult times It s just amazing what a sense of security it gives you Annie Warmke said Read about the service and stewardship award recipients Innovation cooperation on display at OEFFA conference April 4 2013 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren Buckeye Farm News February 19 2013 By Seth Teter The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s recent annual conference highlighted dozens of innovative ways to grow food and bring products to market Many of these efforts emphasized the value of increased coordination among both farmers and consumers I talked with a few of this year s presenters and attendees Here s what they had to say Organic Valley CEO George Siemon described how farmers have found success working together through the producer owned cooperative The dream of every family farm is to have it to go to the next generation And so we know who we want to be we want to serve the next generation of family farms And that s the beauty of a cooperative is that it does represent or serve the community Hear more from Siemon about Organic Valley s approach Bob Cohen of the Cooperative Development Center at Kent State University shared his thoughts on the feasibility of the cooperative model in today s business climate Particularly small and medium scale farmers often can t compete in the marketplace on their own and so they re finding that by banding together they re able to negotiate a better price and sometimes create the mechanisms and infrastructure that enable them to be competitive and more profitable Hear more Cohen Another example of farmers cultivating unique business models came from Marissa Kruthaup of Kruthaup Family Farm The farm has a Community Supported Agriculture program where each year customers buy a share of the farm s products People who are especially concerned about how their food is being grown they can come to the farm and see where it s grown and see how it s grown and interact with us Hear Kruthaup explain how the program works No matter the model Richard Stewart of Carriage House Farm showed how farmers are always pursuing new opportunities In addition to growing a wide variety of crops Stewart is working to convert a former gravel mine into productive farmland Hear more about Stewart s unique farm and his progress on this project Local Fresh Organic Foods in Central Ohio April 4 2013 OEFFA in the News Lauren Food Rap February 21 2013 By Paul Andrews An interview with OEFFA Communications Coordinator Lauren Ketcham Click here to listen Organic Valley s George Siemon a Living Legend in Sustainable Agriculture April 4 2013 Annual Conference OEFFA in the News Lauren The Huffington Post February 26 2013 By Stefanie Penn Spear While attending Ohio s largest food and farming conference last weekend I had the opportunity to sit down with Organic Valley CEO George Siemon Siemon was the featured keynote speaker at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s OEFFA 34th annual conference in Granville Ohio I m inspired by Siemon s ability to engage in food advocacy and policy while at the helm of this highly successful business Organic Valley is an exemplary nearly billion dollar company that shows prioritizing human health and the environment is not only smart business but vital to creating a sustainable planet for future generations SS How did you get involved in farming and what did you do prior to the formation of the Cooperative Regions of Organic Producer Pools CROPP in 1988 GS I was your classic back to the lander I moved to the country and lived close to the land I got pulled into being a farmer and really enjoyed the traditional wisdom of the older farmers Then I discovered organic farming I wasn t raised on a farm so I was very excited for something new I milked cows for about 10 years

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=3&paged=10 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lauren | OEFFA News | Page 10
    overproduction and pollution Agroecology based farming methods not only reduce water pollution they reduce or eliminate pesticide use and can reduce global warming emissions And they have been shown to be profitable and highly productive The lesson from Lake Erie is that piecemeal fixes like no till though they have some important benefits will not fix a system that is fundamentally broken We need systematic change not band aids Addendum The new paper on the sources of phosphorus pollution in Lake Erie points to manure as an important source of phosphorus in the eastern part of the Lake rather than the Maumee River basin in the western part of Lake Erie Figure 13 The Maumee River Basin phosphorus is predominantly from agriculture sources as noted in the blog post but according to the paper mainly from fertilizer the post does note that fertilizer is the overall main source of agricultural phosphorus pollution This does not affect the main points in the blog that agriculture and no till combined with heavier precipitation are major sources of increased phosphorus entering the Lake since the 1990s But it does strongly suggest that the correlation between CAFOs and the Maumee River basin is just that a correlation and not a cause From Market to Farm One couple s commitment to cultivating connections on Ohio s largest certified organic blueberry farm August 18 2014 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren Edible Columbus by Karin McKenna Summer 2014 In a matchup nearly as inspiring as blueberries and cream Phillip and Margaret Nabors well known food advocates and owners of the venerable Mustard Seed Markets are now organic farmers themselves A few miles south of Loudonville and very near the Mohican Memorial State Forest blueberry pickers have been making annual treks to Blueberry Hill Farm for 60 years In 2010 Nabors bought it For years I ve been wanting to own land Phillip explains The 66 acre property was put on the market and though he and Margaret were on vacation with only the Internet on his phone as a meager research tool Phillip saw the potential in the property The rest magically unfolded I didn t do my normal fastidious research but it just seemed right he says The text that he received from Margaret on his way to the auction must have played a large part in the decision Let the angels guide you it read Since then the large group of Nabors family and close friends the 40 Hippie Method Phillip calls it have been working very hard to clear the land of invaders grapevines poison ivy and a couple thousand trees As a result the 5 000 blueberry bushes are breathing a bit easier At any time there may be six to twenty guests visiting the land and helping out Large meals are cooked and enjoyed friendship is shared There s a pool a teepee a friendly contingent of dogs hammocks and a welcoming vibe The longtime association with the farmers with whom they work through Mustard Seed Market has made Phillip and Margaret s transition to the farming life a natural one The connection between the earth and our food supply is profound says Phillip For every bite of food there s a farm somewhere There s a profound process that s worthy of appreciation It takes a lot of effort to manage all of the forces to get food to grow out of the ground and get it to market As the land is cleared they re planting new trees Long term plans include diversifying and focusing on high nutritional value super fruits and aligning with the permaculture model They re introducing forest gardening creating a habitat for mushrooms ginseng medicinal herbs things that want to grow in the forest as Phillip says Between the forest and pasture are the paw paws persimmons and nut trees There are a lot of interesting crops that want to grow on the edges and we re going to help them along by planting them he says Obviously the food aspects of Blueberry Hill are important but the spiritual effects of the farm have become apparent as well To a person everybody who goes there feels something Phillip says We ve had some amazing experiences with our guests really connecting with this land Visitors receive explicit instructions at Blueberry Hill to taste the berries as they pick and Phillip likens the joy that comes from this to feeding our inner caveperson s primal connectivity to the earth We take the larceny right out of the equation By saying that it s okay to eat as they pick we take the guilt off the table Very often kids will come back their faces just smeared with blueberries and about 12 berries in their bucket They come back with these huge smiles It s fun for us to enable that The Nabors hands these days are quite full with Blueberry Hill and the two grocery stores Joining locations in Solon and in Montrose a third Mustard Seed Market is under construction in the Highland Square area of Akron I am incredibly excited about the store because it s not just a new store it s a new path for us Phillip shares The newest market is a smaller store in the dense neighborhood where the Nabors family has lived for 35 years on the edge of an official USDA food desert Lacking a grocery store for 15 years the neighborhood is truly hungry for its offerings and much thought is being put into how to best serve the area What s amazing is that the category of natural organic stores has evolved to where now we can do a natural organic store and serve as the neighborhood grocery store That really wasn t possible as little as 10 years ago explains Phillip With an eye toward education a value oriented mix of offerings and cutting edge green building features there is a lot of excitement about the new store which could open as early as December of this year Of course shoppers will find Blueberry Hill berries in all three Mustard Seed stores Blueberry picking begins when the berries are ripe Watch the Blueberry Hill Facebook page for the latest updates or call the farm at 740 599 5050 Blueberry Hill is located at 23038 Gessling Road in Glenmont Directions are on the website at BlueberryHillFamilyFarms com Cost Share Assistance Available for Growers and Handlers of Organic Agricultural Products July 24 2014 OEFFA in the News Organic Certification Lauren Ohio Department of Agriculture Press Release 7 22 2014 REYNOLDSBURG OH The Ohio Department of Agriculture today announced it will receive 478 600 to help growers and handlers of organic agricultural products recover part of the cost of their U S Department of Agriculture USDA certification Producers and handlers who incur expenses for obtaining or renewing their organic certification between October 1 2013 and September 30 2014 are eligible for reimbursement Payments will be up to 75 percent of an individual producer s certification costs with a maximum of 750 per certification scope crops livestock handling wildcrops Grant funding is provided by USDA s National Organic Certification Cost Share Program Approximately 11 5 million is available nationwide for organic certification cost share assistance making certification more accessible for certified producers and handlers The department is working in partnership with the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA to verify the certification of organic operations and to manage reimbursement requests Those interested in applying for cost share assistance may do so directly through OEFFA Applications must be postmarked by November 15 2014 For more information on cost share program guidelines or to apply visit http certification oeffa org costshare or call OEFFA directly at 614 262 2022 July 21 2014 Farm Policy Lauren Public News Service By Mary Kuhlman 7 14 14 Mud Run Farm in Stark County uses horsepower to reduce emissions linked to a warming climate Photo courtesy of Mud Run Farm COLUMBUS Ohio The National Climate Assessment finds climate stressors such as weeds and diseases are threatening the future of farming But the report also suggests that sustainable agriculture practices could help slow the pace of climate change Mud Run Farm in Stark County is a small organic operation Owner Alex Dragovich says changes of his farm s position in the U S Department of Agriculture s plant hardiness zone maps indicate a shift to warmer temperatures for growing And he admits there have been some changes in weather patterns impacting agriculture in Ohio The season went from very cold to warm in a short amount of time and then a lot of rain he points out Can I say that that s climate change Maybe in the long term but not in the short term It s like a chronic illness you don t realize you have it until it s too late Dragovich says his farm uses earth friendly practices that reduce carbon emissions He s cut back on the use of diesel fuels by powering his farm mostly with horses and also manages cover crops which reduce the amount of tractor time needed in the fields The National Climate Assessment found that the resiliency of the agriculture system can be increased through sustainable methods such as diversifying crop rotations integrating livestock with crop production systems and minimizing off farm flows of nutrients and pesticides Dragovich says he s hopeful the next farming generation embraces sustainable methods and considers the impact agricultural practices have on the environment I see a lot of young people taking up the organic mantra and trying to save this planet he says So hopefully these young people will be a little more respective of Mother Earth and hopefully will be better at it than my generation Recent research found organic farming methods that encourage soil health create higher yielding crops better able to cope with weather related stressors compared to conventional farming Ohio cattle ranchers rebuilding herds July 21 2014 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren The Columbus Dispatch By JD Malone 7 17 14 On Saturdays at the Worthington Farmers Market Licking County rancher John Wiley sells every piece and package of beef he brings Thanks to historic high prices for both beef and live cattle Wiley s grass fed cuts aren t cheap but that hasn t hurt his sales and he s working to produce more High prices unrelenting demand and decent weather have Ohio s cattle herds once again on the rise Buckeye ranchers added 2 percent to their stock this year over last one of the few states to do so the U S Department of Agriculture said But unlike businesses that make toys cars or computers adding production capacity at the ranch level isn t as easy as throwing up a new building or contracting with another manufacturer It s complicated by fickle markets biology and weather say Wiley and other experts Beef is a different sort of animal Americans have a love affair with beef and insatiable demand in a headwind of historic prices proves it We ve seen demand continue to increase said Darren Tristano executive vice president of Technomic which tracks the restaurant industry Consumption is up Consumers like their beef and burgers The U S beef herd has long been in decline The nation s herd size peaked in the 1990s and has lost 38 million head since It is now as small as it was in 1951 when there were half as many Americans to feed according to USDA and U S census records Recent droughts the widespread calamity of 2011 and the current rainfall deficit in the West have prompted ranchers to cull millions from their herds because they have become too expensive to feed We are starting to see signs of some hints toward expansion said Elizabeth Harsh president of the Ohio Cattlemen s Association Ohio has been fortunate We have been in a different weather pattern Beef producers are at the mercy of Mother Nature Ohio s pasture and range lands are in good shape with 93 percent in fair to excellent condition according to the USDA s latest crop report In major beef producing states such as Texas Kansas and Colorado 20 percent to 35 percent of pastures are in poor to very poor condition In California the report rated 75 percent of pasture as poor to very poor Partly because of good grazing conditions Ohio s ranchers kept more heifers young female cows to breed and are looking to grow their herds as their operations allow Harsh said Wiley has added 20 cows to his operation Up the Lane Farm through the past couple of years but he is now at capacity Wiley said his fellow ranchers struggle with the decision to cash in their cows at today s prices or hold a few back and grow a bit to see if tomorrow brings even better returns Some of these guys are more likely to hang on when the prices are up Wiley said The animals are worth so much money it is almost too expensive to turn them into meat Calves are sold by weight and weigh between 450 to 800 pounds Prices for calves in June 2013 ranged from 640 to 1 000 the USDA said This June prices ranged from 1 000 to 1 600 We keep raising our retail beef prices to keep up Wiley said But everything we do keeps costing more everything from hay and the price of calves I would say it has doubled in about five years Because of the high price of calves and low herd count fewer animals are being sent to slaughter this year the USDA said Harsh and Wiley agree that there are fewer cows at local processors If true expansion happens it ll come slowly Predictions aren t for a rapid expansion anytime soon said Stephen Boyles a beef expert with Ohio State University Extension I see interest but I m not sure I have seen a lot of action To hold back a heifer to expand a herd through breeding and raising a calf is a two to three year commitment Boyles said That is a long term investment without a guarantee that prices will remain high Just buying a calf and raising it for slaughter takes 12 to 18 months Wiley said his customers often ask why he doesn t bring more meat to the farmers market when he knows he has a strong customer base What I tell people is that the animals I have now are the ones I bought two years ago Wiley said I didn t know you d be here two years ago Checkoffs More and more of the same July 21 2014 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren Farm and Dairy By Alan Guebert 7 10 14 According to the U S Department of Agriculture there now are federal commodity checkoffs for beef blueberries Christmas trees cotton dairy products eggs fluid milk Hass avocados Honey Packers and Importers lamb mango mushrooms paper and paper based packaging peanuts popcorn pork potatoes processed raspberries softwood lumber sorghum soybeans and watermelons Let s see that s 1 2 3 whoa 22 These 22 federally mandated largely nonrefundable commodity checkoffs raise most of an estimated 750 million per year from U S farmers and ranchers to promote everything from well avocados to watermelons Wait there s more Long as that menu is however it s not the whole checkoff enchilada USDA operates another 35 or so federal commodity marketing orders and many states oversee dozens more local commodity checkoffs For example there are at least 22 state corn checkoffs for varying amounts per bushel some refundable some not that contribute a portion of their money to a coordinated national corn promotion effort Also many state beef groups either now have or are pursuing statewide beef checkoffs to add up to another 1 per head to fund state specific beef promotion programs on top of the 1 per head nonrefundable federal checkoff each beef and dairy producer already pays upon sale of their animals Combine state and national checkoff collections and it s guessed because checkoff data is not compiled that American farmers and ranchers pay 1 25 billion per year for commodity promotion and research Organic checkoff That pile will grow if the Organic Trade Association a self described membership based business association for the organic industry in North America is able to sway federal lawmakers to endorse an organic checkoff in the next two years OTA claims a checkoff would carry benefits for farmers and industry alike It sees the money pegged between 20 million and 40 million per year as a way to distinguish organic in the market place grow demand and help the consumer understand all that organic delivers Links to documents are posted at http farmandfoodfile com in the news To raise the money OTA is pushing an assessment plan it calls broad and shallow for everyone in the organic supply chain Everyone means not only producers according to OTA but also handlers brand manufacturers co packers and importers Exempted from paying any checkoff however would be organic certificate holders most players in the U S organic market must be certified organic by USDA with gross annual sales of 250 000 or less The proposed assessment advocated by OTA is 1 10 of 1 percent of gross organic revenue greater than 250 001 per year For example OTA explains there would be a 1 000 assessment at 1 000 000 gross organic revenue One sided While OTA s checkoff plan is relatively broader and cheaper than its federal siblings most organic farmers see little need for it Ed Maltby executive director of the Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance recently posted a lengthy discussion on NODPA s website on what he calls OTA s one sided propaganda campaign for the checkoff In fact

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?author=2&paged=10 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Court Restores Right to Know in Ohio and Throughout the U.S. | OEFFA News
    of the rule created by the Ohio Department of Agriculture that essentially prohibited labeling dairy products as rBGH free The court also rejected a portion of the rule that had placed severe restrictions on other types of labeling that referred to the use of rBGH This means that farmers in Ohio will be able to label their milk as produced from cows that were not treated with rBGH and that consumers will still be able to use this information when they purchase dairy products Today s ruling will hopefully encourage dairy producers that have already gone rBGH free to label their products accordingly We also hope that the state of Ohio has learned that attempts to restrict milk labeling are a waste of time and money Because much of the milk produced in Ohio is sold across state lines this ruling is a victory for consumers in Ohio and throughout the U S Post navigation Ohio s Eat Local Challenge Week The Challenge is Trying It All OEFFA Announces Free Public Tour Series Featuring Ohio s Organic and Sustainable Farms Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=154 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • court | OEFFA News
    by the International Dairy Foods Association and the Organic Trade Association threw out a part of the rule created by the Ohio Department of Agriculture that essentially prohibited labeling dairy products as rBGH free The court also rejected a portion of the rule that had placed severe restrictions on other types of labeling that referred to the use of rBGH This means that farmers in Ohio will be able to label their milk as produced from cows that were not treated with rBGH and that consumers will still be able to use this information when they purchase dairy products Today s ruling will hopefully encourage dairy producers that have already gone rBGH free to label their products accordingly We also hope that the state of Ohio has learned that attempts to restrict milk labeling are a waste of time and money Because much of the milk produced in Ohio is sold across state lines this ruling is a victory for consumers in Ohio and throughout the U S Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=court (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • milk | OEFFA News
    Diet For a New America and on my website this isn t the first time something like this has happened In the 1980s doctors in Puerto Rico began encountering cases of precocious puberty There were four year old girls with fully developed breasts There were three year old girls with pubic hair and vaginal bleeding There were one year old girls who had not yet begun to walk but whose breasts were growing And it wasn t just the females Young boys were also affected Many had to have surgery to deal with breasts that had become grossly swollen Writing a few years later in the Journal of the Puerto Rico Medical Association Dr Carmen A Saenz explained the cause It was clearly observed in 97 percent of the cases that the appearance of abnormal breast tissue was related to local whole milk in the infants The problem was traced and found to stem from the misuse of hormones in dairy cows When Dr Saenz was asked how she could be certain the babies and children were contaminated with hormones from milk rather than from some other source she replied simply When we take our young patients off fresh milk their symptoms usually regress Along with China the U S is today one of the few countries in the world that still allows bovine growth hormones to be injected into dairy cows Though banned in Canada Japan Australia New Zealand and most of Europe the use of these hormones in U S dairy is not only legal it s routine in all 50 states The U S dairy industry assures us that this is not a problem But there is a very real problem and its name is Insulin like Growth Factor 1 IGF 1 Monsanto s own studies as well as those of Eli Lilly Co have found a 10 fold increase in IGF 1 levels in the milk of cows who have been injected with bovine growth hormone BGH Why is that a problem A report by the European Commission s authoritative international 16 member scientific committee not only confirmed that excessive levels of IGF 1 are always found in the milk of cows injected with BGH It also concluded that excess levels of IGF 1 pose serious risks of breast colon and prostate cancer How serious is the increased risk According to an article in the May 9 1998 issue of the medical journal The Lancet women with even a relatively small increase in blood levels of IGF 1 are up to seven times more likely to develop breast cancer than women with lower levels IGF 1 that is consumed by human beings in dairy products is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream It isn t destroyed by human digestion And pasteurization is no help In fact the pasteurization process actually increases IGF 1 levels in milk What s a consumer to do If at all possible breast feed your babies and support breast feeding friendly workplaces and

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=milk (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive



  •