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  • herbicides | OEFFA News
    and water hemp and marestail in Illinois grow fast and produce tens of thousands of seeds It s getting to be a big deal said Mike Plumer a 61 year old farmer and University of Illinois agronomist who grows soybeans and cotton near the southern Illinois community of Creal Springs If you ve got it it s a real big deal When Monsanto introduced Roundup in 1976 it was like the best thing since sliced bread said Garry Niemeyer who grows corn and soybeans near Auburn in central Illinois The weed killer known generically as glyphosate is absorbed through plants leaves and kills them by blocking the production of proteins they need to grow The U S Environmental Protection Agency considers it to have little toxicity to people and animals and it s less of a threat to the environment because it quickly binds to soil and becomes inactive Monsanto s introduction of seeds designed to survive Roundup made things even better for farmers because they could spray it on emerging crops to wipe out the weeds Seeds containing Monsanto s Roundup Ready traits are now used to grow about 90 percent of the nation s soybeans and 70percent of its corn and cotton With increased reliance on Roundup herbicide use on corn decreased from 2 76pounds an acre in 1994 to 2 06 in 2005 the most recent year for which the U S Department of Agriculture has data Spread that out over the 81 8 million acres planted in 2005 and it s a decrease of more than 57 million pounds of herbicides annually Farmers also found they could cut back or in some cases eliminate tilling reducing erosion and fuel use But with any herbicide the more it s used the more likely it ll run into individual plants within a species that have just enough genetic variation to survive what kills most of their relatives With each generation the survivors represent a larger percentage of the species St Louis based Monsanto maintains the resistance is often overstated We believe that glyphosate will remain an important tool in the farmers arsenal Monsanto spokesman John Combest said That said the company has started paying cotton farmers 12 an acre to cover the cost of other herbicides used alongside Roundup to boost its effectiveness The trend has confirmed some food safety groups belief that biotechnology won t reduce the use of chemicals in the long run That s being reversed said Bill Freese a chemist with the Washington D C based Center For Food Safety which promotes organic agriculture They re going to dramatically increase use of those chemicals and that s bad news The first weeds in the U S that survived Roundup were found about 10 years ago in Delaware Monsanto and other companies are developing new seeds designed to resist older herbicides such as dicamba and 2 4 D a weed killer developed during World War II and an ingredient in Agent Orange which was used

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=herbicides (2016-02-17)
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  • Field Report: A Michigan Teen Farms Her Backyard | OEFFA News
    sideways at her mother while drinking a tall glass of chocolate milk from a nearby dairy My mom thought it wasn t the best idea because of the road we live on which is narrow and fairly fast She d been learning about the C S A aspect so she told me about it and I really liked the idea I liked that it was on my own schedule so I could kind of pick what I wanted cause it is still my summer she adds finally sounding like a teenager and I don t want to like you know be busy every single minute of the day Reau entered her idea for Garden to Go in the Prima Civitas Foundation youth inventors competition and her business plan won 300 in start up money While we eat a colorful salad of spinach strawberry and goat cheese Reau s spinach and strawberries local goat cheese deviled eggs bartered and strawberry shortcake local good in the Reaus toile curtained dining room Brenda explains that a quarter of last year s members told her that they were attracted to Garden to Go because it was a young person s effort They want to support someone who is interested in working instead of being on the Internet all day Brenda says And growing food I reached one of Reau s customers Mary Janicki of Sylvania Ohio on her pontoon boat I liked the idea that she was such a go getter said Janicki who found Garden to Go through Reau s page on Localharvest org last year I read that she won that award and was only 13 years old and I thought This is a young lady who s got it together Janicki has signed up for a second summer because she appreciates the freshness of the produce as well as the idea of eating locally And that corn Oh my goodness Following last year s success with five members and a few standbys who came whenever extra vegetables were available Reau s summer project has jumped the plot Herbs and squash pop up in the flower beds edging the house more tomatoes were started in a raised bed that her dad improvised from a neighbor s recycled soybean seed bag she grows flowers and peppers at her grandmother s house next door more flowers are flourishing outside her two rabbit barns Reau has been a national champion rabbit breeder since she was 10 for the past four years she s been packaging the manure in her dad s old plastic nail buckets and selling it as Bunny Honey Asked which vegetable she s proudest of Reau said potatoes Just because potatoes are something everyone eats you don t think about that you grow them you just eat them And their skins aren t dry and ucky like what you get at stores She s also curious about this summer s tomato experiment Her neighbor a World War II veteran named Leon Spaulding

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=84 (2016-02-17)
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  • backyard | OEFFA News
    my own farm stand out in my front yard Alexandra says at the kitchen table looking sideways at her mother while drinking a tall glass of chocolate milk from a nearby dairy My mom thought it wasn t the best idea because of the road we live on which is narrow and fairly fast She d been learning about the C S A aspect so she told me about it and I really liked the idea I liked that it was on my own schedule so I could kind of pick what I wanted cause it is still my summer she adds finally sounding like a teenager and I don t want to like you know be busy every single minute of the day Reau entered her idea for Garden to Go in the Prima Civitas Foundation youth inventors competition and her business plan won 300 in start up money While we eat a colorful salad of spinach strawberry and goat cheese Reau s spinach and strawberries local goat cheese deviled eggs bartered and strawberry shortcake local good in the Reaus toile curtained dining room Brenda explains that a quarter of last year s members told her that they were attracted to Garden to Go because it was a young person s effort They want to support someone who is interested in working instead of being on the Internet all day Brenda says And growing food I reached one of Reau s customers Mary Janicki of Sylvania Ohio on her pontoon boat I liked the idea that she was such a go getter said Janicki who found Garden to Go through Reau s page on Localharvest org last year I read that she won that award and was only 13 years old and I thought This is a young lady who s got it together Janicki has signed up for a second summer because she appreciates the freshness of the produce as well as the idea of eating locally And that corn Oh my goodness Following last year s success with five members and a few standbys who came whenever extra vegetables were available Reau s summer project has jumped the plot Herbs and squash pop up in the flower beds edging the house more tomatoes were started in a raised bed that her dad improvised from a neighbor s recycled soybean seed bag she grows flowers and peppers at her grandmother s house next door more flowers are flourishing outside her two rabbit barns Reau has been a national champion rabbit breeder since she was 10 for the past four years she s been packaging the manure in her dad s old plastic nail buckets and selling it as Bunny Honey Asked which vegetable she s proudest of Reau said potatoes Just because potatoes are something everyone eats you don t think about that you grow them you just eat them And their skins aren t dry and ucky like what you get at stores She s also curious

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=backyard (2016-02-17)
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  • Farmers Lean to Truce on Animals’ Close Quarters | OEFFA News
    initial shock at the agreement he has accepted it as necessary He will not be immediately affected since it allows existing egg farms to continue but bars new ones with similar cages He defends his methods saying My own belief is that I m doing the right thing Egg production is at the center of the debate because more than 90 percent of the country s eggs are now produced in the stacked rows of cages that critics call inhumane Ohio is the country s second largest egg producer after Iowa In the modern version of an egg barn hordes of hens live with computer controlled air circulation lighting and feeding their droppings whisked away by conveyor belt for recycling as fertilizer As the hens jostle one other their eggs roll onto a belt to be washed graded and packed without ever being touched by human hands Mr Weaver insists that his chickens are content and less prone to disease than those in barnyard flocks saying If our chickens aren t healthy and happy they won t be as productive Keeping chickens in cages is cruel and unnecessary counter advocates like Wayne Pacelle chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States which has played a central role in the state by state battles Animals that are built to move should be allowed to move he said in an interview and for chickens that means space for dust bathing perching and nesting The assertion that animals must be happy to be productive is not accurate Mr Pacelle added pointing to abnormal behaviors like head waving or bar biting and to a loss of bone density in confined animals In the mid 20th century developments in animal nutrition and farm technologies as well as economic competition spurred the emergence of large scale farms often driving out small farmers who could not afford the large capital investments or survive the lower prices Now the United Egg Producers a national trade group says that egg prices would rise by 25 percent if all eggs were produced by uncaged hens putting stress on consumers and school lunch programs Animal proponents say that better noncage methods could be developed and that price is not the ultimate issue anyway The American Veal Association under pressure from consumers agreed in 2007 to phase out the close confinement of calves by 2017 The requirement in the California law and the Ohio agreement to phase out the use of gestation crates on hog farms will have much wider effects The family of Irv Bell 64 has been growing hogs in Zanesville Ohio since the 19th century Where males and females were once put into a pen to mate sows are now inseminated artificially and most are kept through their pregnancy in a 2 by 7 foot crate in which they can lie down but not turn I work with the hogs every day and I don t think there is anything wrong with gestation crates he said But

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=75 (2016-02-17)
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  • cages | OEFFA News
    or seven to a cage Mr Weaver said that after his initial shock at the agreement he has accepted it as necessary He will not be immediately affected since it allows existing egg farms to continue but bars new ones with similar cages He defends his methods saying My own belief is that I m doing the right thing Egg production is at the center of the debate because more than 90 percent of the country s eggs are now produced in the stacked rows of cages that critics call inhumane Ohio is the country s second largest egg producer after Iowa In the modern version of an egg barn hordes of hens live with computer controlled air circulation lighting and feeding their droppings whisked away by conveyor belt for recycling as fertilizer As the hens jostle one other their eggs roll onto a belt to be washed graded and packed without ever being touched by human hands Mr Weaver insists that his chickens are content and less prone to disease than those in barnyard flocks saying If our chickens aren t healthy and happy they won t be as productive Keeping chickens in cages is cruel and unnecessary counter advocates like Wayne Pacelle chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States which has played a central role in the state by state battles Animals that are built to move should be allowed to move he said in an interview and for chickens that means space for dust bathing perching and nesting The assertion that animals must be happy to be productive is not accurate Mr Pacelle added pointing to abnormal behaviors like head waving or bar biting and to a loss of bone density in confined animals In the mid 20th century developments in animal nutrition and farm technologies as well as economic competition spurred the emergence of large scale farms often driving out small farmers who could not afford the large capital investments or survive the lower prices Now the United Egg Producers a national trade group says that egg prices would rise by 25 percent if all eggs were produced by uncaged hens putting stress on consumers and school lunch programs Animal proponents say that better noncage methods could be developed and that price is not the ultimate issue anyway The American Veal Association under pressure from consumers agreed in 2007 to phase out the close confinement of calves by 2017 The requirement in the California law and the Ohio agreement to phase out the use of gestation crates on hog farms will have much wider effects The family of Irv Bell 64 has been growing hogs in Zanesville Ohio since the 19th century Where males and females were once put into a pen to mate sows are now inseminated artificially and most are kept through their pregnancy in a 2 by 7 foot crate in which they can lie down but not turn I work with the hogs every day and I don t

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=cages (2016-02-17)
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  • State proposes denial of egg farm permits | OEFFA News
    Cindy Kalis said Local officials never supplied such documentation The largest farm projects egg farms that house at least 820 000 chickens or dairy farms that house at least 7 000 head of cattle must notify local officials of how farm traffic will use local roads Farm officials also need documentation that local officials have reviewed those plans and assessed the farm traffic s potential impact on local roads The potential denial of permits to Hi Q suggests local officials could hold up permits for big farms by simply declining to provide that documentation It s hard to understand how the state of Ohio could take the action that it did said Kevin Braig Hi Q attorney Hi Q did everything that was required in the permit It was the county and township that failed to fulfill their obligation Hi Q is considering its options and can request a hearing within 30 days If it doesn t request a hearing permits will automatically be denied Kalis said The Hi Q project also had been caught in the political crosshairs of a compromise brokered by Gov Ted Strickland between farm groups and the Humane Society of the United States on controversial housing practices for farm animals including the caging of hens The deal kept a Humane Society initiative off the November ballot In negotiating a compromise everyone at the table understood that the Hi Q project would not come to fruition under proposed animal care rules a spokeswoman for the governor said last month In an Aug 25 letter the Ohio Corn Growers Association urged Union County officials to remove the roadblock saying Hi Q promises an important market for corn growers Contact this reporter at 937 225 7457 or bsutherly DaytonDailyNews com This article appeared in the Dayton Daily News

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=71 (2016-02-17)
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  • denial | OEFFA News
    planned to use local roads around its facility department spokeswoman Cindy Kalis said Local officials never supplied such documentation The largest farm projects egg farms that house at least 820 000 chickens or dairy farms that house at least 7 000 head of cattle must notify local officials of how farm traffic will use local roads Farm officials also need documentation that local officials have reviewed those plans and assessed the farm traffic s potential impact on local roads The potential denial of permits to Hi Q suggests local officials could hold up permits for big farms by simply declining to provide that documentation It s hard to understand how the state of Ohio could take the action that it did said Kevin Braig Hi Q attorney Hi Q did everything that was required in the permit It was the county and township that failed to fulfill their obligation Hi Q is considering its options and can request a hearing within 30 days If it doesn t request a hearing permits will automatically be denied Kalis said The Hi Q project also had been caught in the political crosshairs of a compromise brokered by Gov Ted Strickland between farm groups and the Humane Society of the United States on controversial housing practices for farm animals including the caging of hens The deal kept a Humane Society initiative off the November ballot In negotiating a compromise everyone at the table understood that the Hi Q project would not come to fruition under proposed animal care rules a spokeswoman for the governor said last month In an Aug 25 letter the Ohio Corn Growers Association urged Union County officials to remove the roadblock saying Hi Q promises an important market for corn growers Contact this reporter at 937 225 7457 or bsutherly

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=denial (2016-02-17)
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  • egg farm | OEFFA News
    planned to use local roads around its facility department spokeswoman Cindy Kalis said Local officials never supplied such documentation The largest farm projects egg farms that house at least 820 000 chickens or dairy farms that house at least 7 000 head of cattle must notify local officials of how farm traffic will use local roads Farm officials also need documentation that local officials have reviewed those plans and assessed the farm traffic s potential impact on local roads The potential denial of permits to Hi Q suggests local officials could hold up permits for big farms by simply declining to provide that documentation It s hard to understand how the state of Ohio could take the action that it did said Kevin Braig Hi Q attorney Hi Q did everything that was required in the permit It was the county and township that failed to fulfill their obligation Hi Q is considering its options and can request a hearing within 30 days If it doesn t request a hearing permits will automatically be denied Kalis said The Hi Q project also had been caught in the political crosshairs of a compromise brokered by Gov Ted Strickland between farm groups and the Humane Society of the United States on controversial housing practices for farm animals including the caging of hens The deal kept a Humane Society initiative off the November ballot In negotiating a compromise everyone at the table understood that the Hi Q project would not come to fruition under proposed animal care rules a spokeswoman for the governor said last month In an Aug 25 letter the Ohio Corn Growers Association urged Union County officials to remove the roadblock saying Hi Q promises an important market for corn growers Contact this reporter at 937 225 7457 or bsutherly

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?tag=egg-farm (2016-02-17)
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