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  • Ohio Pipeline Projects Stir Fears of Compromised Farmland Integrity | OEFFA News
    quality and is linked to earthquakes instead of long term energy solutions Supporters of the projects maintain they would lead to cheaper energy and say pipelines are the safest and cheapest way to transport natural gas James Yoder produces organic milk at Clover Meadow Farm in Wayne County where the ET Rover pipeline would cut diagonally across 11 acres If the company does not use a mitigation plan he says his organic certification would be in jeopardy I probably wouldn t go on farming if we had to be conventional he states If they don t follow those guidelines I m sure part of the land or all of the land would be conventional I don t know if we could get it back if we go through the three year transition period to get the affected land back to organic again At this point Lipstreu says there s been no word if the company will take any measures to prevent soil contamination degradation of milk quality and loss of organic certification on Yoder s property But she adds the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is accepting public input on the pipelines There is an opportunity for people to weigh in on this issue she states We can think about what we re doing here and think in terms of more long term sustainability She also points to the risks to health and safety posed by new pipeline infrastructure In November 2011 a natural gas transmission pipeline exploded in Morgan County burning three houses and leaving a 30 foot wide crater The next year a pipeline spill polluted one and a half miles of Boggs Fork in Harrison County Post navigation At Least 4 Good Reasons to Boost Soil Organic Matter and a Chance to Learn How to Do It OEFFA

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2252 (2016-02-17)
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  • Sustainable Agriculture in the News | OEFFA News
    greater than 80 percent of household income through farming In fact Organic Valley not only keeps a stable price for its members but also sets a higher standard of fairness in pricing and contracts in the organic dairy market that other companies are forced to compete with Keep buying from alternative food networks but don t stop there Pay attention when the next Farm Bill the big piece of legislation that shapes U S food and farm policy is up for debate The market for organically grown foods has grown by double digits in most years since the 1990s but there is a significant national shortage of farmers able to meet this demand There is no reason we shouldn t have a policy structure that reflects this demand and provides fair competition and equal opportunity for all farmers Water Quality in Ohio Taking a Page from Organic Farming July 27 2015 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren By Mary Kuhlman Public News Service 7 20 15 PHOTO Sustainable farming groups say lessons from organic farming can help solve Ohio s toxic and unsightly algae problems and improve water quality Photo courtesy NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory July 20 2015 COLUMBUS Ohio Algal blooms in Lake Erie are predicted to be among the worst in recorded history this summer And organic farmers say taking a page from their playbook can help state leaders working to address the recurring problem and other water quality issues Organic farms are prohibited from using synthetic fertilizers which are linked to toxic algae One farmer Dave Shively of northwest Ohio says the practices he uses reduce runoff and soil erosion which in turn reduce the chances that excess nutrients reach waterways Most of the products we use are more water soluble so they stay in place more he explains And any manures we put on are usually incorporated right away And we do a lot of crop rotation which we put a lot of small grains in and legumes Ohio recently enacted a law Senate Bill 1 that prohibits applying manure and fertilizer on frozen or saturated ground The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association is among the groups suggesting growers follow organic farmers lead and use sustainable practices such as cover cropping crop rotation and field buffers to reduce farm runoff into waterways Organic farmers also are required to take steps to maintain water quality as part of their Organic System Plan Shively says protecting water sources is vital to the health of the ecosystem and the public What we re doing is trying to not pollute that with pesticides and herbicides and insecticides so we re doing a more sustainable natural way he explains Shively stresses chemicals used in traditional farming should be reduced to improve water quality I feel very strongly about the chemical ag world and that that s a practice that s getting worse and worse as we go along with more potent chemicals and pesticides he states And they re creating resistance to herbicides which is creating a whole other issue According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA the effects of algae in Lake Erie are expected to peak in August or early September Flower farm open house touts local sustainable July 27 2015 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren By Joshua Lim The Columbus Dispatch 6 29 15 In a straw hat and with the sleeves of his checkered shirt rolled up enough that you could see his tattoo of a dahlia Steve Adams revealed his obsession in the sprawling field of some of the most beautiful blooms in Columbus About 100 people attended the open house at Adams Sunny Meadows Flower Farm on the East Side on Sunday to hear about how the sharpest red and deepest blue blooms rise from the farm The open house is part of an annual series of farmers events held by members of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association Renee Hunt the association s program director said tours workshops and open houses are held each year to give farmers and consumers a firsthand opportunity to learn different practices from a variety of farmers People are sharing what they know so that that information can be taken and be used elsewhere and promote any successful farming practices she said Adams and his wife Gretel started their farm in 2007 because they were passionate about buying and selling locally made products especially fresh flowers They grow flowers for mixed cut bouquets to sell at local farmers markets to florists and for weddings and other occasions Growing flowers for people to give to loved ones to express joy love sadness and remorse is something the Adamses don t take lightly And they want people to share those emotions with local products People are going to come and see what the other option is for flowers to see why local flowers are just as important as local food Mr Adams said We want people to be buying local flowers whether they re from us or they re from other growers The U S cut flower industry accounts for 7 billion to 8 billion in sales in a year according to the Society of American Florists but only a fraction of flowers come from local farms Imports make up 79 percent of the U S supply of cut flowers and greens according to the California Cut Flower Commission Adams said flowers from foreign countries might have been sprayed with chemicals that are harmful to consumers For us sustainability is a farm that can continue to provide fresh quality flowers without synthetic fertilizers and chemical inputs he said Sunny Meadows does not use herbicides and it uses compost as fertilizer Mrs Adams said The farm also uses beneficial insects to control pests Eric Pawlowski the association s sustainable agriculture educator said he has benefited from the tours because farmers often provide tips that can make or break a crop of any size It s not so much the how or the do but it s the what not to do he said In addition to the annual farm open houses the association has a number of farm tours and workshops which started in June and will end in late October More information is at www oeffa org Lindsey Baker 32 a florist in Morrow Ohio said she was interested in learning from Adams because she started growing flowers this year When you find out you can grow all this right here in Ohio we should do a lot more of that Baker said You re supporting the family you re supporting your local economy and you re cutting down on the energy to transport those flowers Alwin Chan Frederick 36 said he was impressed by the farm s sustainable practices Supporting kinds of small businesses like theirs is important for the local community he said U S House of Representatives Denies Americans the Right to Know July 24 2015 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren Statement by Amalie Lipstreu OEFFA Policy Program Coordinator Friday July 24 2015 Contact Amalie Lipstreu Policy Program Coordinator 614 421 2022 Ext 208 amalie oeffa org Lauren Ketcham Communications Coordinator 614 421 2022 Ext 203 lauren oeffa org On Thursday July 23 by a vote of 275 to 150 the U S House of Representatives passed HR 1599 misleadingly titled The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act More accurately dubbed the Deny Americans the Right to Know DARK Act the bill flies in the face of public opinion by denying citizens the right to choose what they eat and feed their families and throws out all state efforts to label genetically engineered GE food such as the laws already passed in Maine Connecticut and Vermont This bill s absurdity is immense Although proponents say voluntary labeling is the solution no companies have voluntarily opted to label their foods as GE The Dark Act also ends states rights to regulate food labeling and even more appallingly it allows GE foods to be labeled as natural The House placed the interests of large corporate agribusiness above the interests of an overwhelming majority of the people they represent who have consistently asked for the right to know if food contains GE ingredients A poll conducted by OEFFA in February found that 87 percent of Ohio voters across partisan lines support GE labeling I encourage all Ohioans to take the opportunity to view how their representative voted on the bill and to let them know where they stand on this issue A similar measure has yet to be introduced in the Senate and is expected to face a much tougher battle so there s still a chance for the public to make its voice heard OEFFA reveals organic Ohio farm tour schedule for 2015 from goat cheese to chickens June 1 2015 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren By Debbi Snook The Plain Dealer 5 12 15 CLEVELAND Ohio Time to get your proverbial boots dusty Fifteen organic farm tours from chickens to vegetables and grains are part of this year s series organized by the Columbus based Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA Northeast Ohioans won t have to travel far for several of them including The Farmers Table a farm to table dinner Aug 30 at Maplestar Farm in Geauga County Muddy Fork Farm in Wayne County kicks off the schedule on June 3 with a demonstration of its pastured poultry research On July 19 MorningSide Farm in Medina County opens its vegetable growing operation to everyone especially those who buy from them at Cleveland area farmers markets Nine events will turn into learning workshops including poultry processing October 11 at Tea Hills Farms in Ashland County a five day solar energy class starting October 12 in Wayne County and an urban agriculture exchange Oct 24 at Ohio City Farm Cleveland This is a great chance for everyone interested in local foods to turn over a new leaf said OEFFA representative Lauren Ketcham They can learn how sustainably produced food is grown and connect with others who share a passion for sustainable agriculture They also can learn she said about the life of a shepherd how to control weeds without chemicals see draft horses make sorghum into sweet syrup sample local meats cheeses and jams and butcher their own poultry A list of all the programs plus details and a statewide map can be found online Ohio homesteaders and sustainability advocates feel good about kefir May 11 2015 Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren By Vivian Goodman WKSU News 3 20 15 One of the world s oldest elixirs is back in vogue Kefir is a beverage made from fermented milk Its health benefits remain largely unproven But fans claim that drinking it makes them feel good Besides it s a local sustainable food source that can be made at home In today s Quick Bite WKSU s Vivian Goodman delves into the drink Kefir is something like liquid yogurt It s thick white creamy and bubbly and tastes tart slightly sour and yeasty like a cross between yogurt and buttermilk It s one of the world s oldest cultured milk products Marco Polo himself sang its praises And these days kefir s being rediscovered by do it yourselfers and proponents of sustainable food systems Making converts to kefir Warren Taylor of Snowville Creamery led a kefir workshop at last month s annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association He calls himself a dairy evangelist Before the workshop began Taylor passed around buttons that read Kefir feel good The name derives from a Turkish word for well being Taylor feels great and hopes to convert others to what s been his way of life for almost 40 years I generally get up in the morning my tummy s pretty empty I put about a quart of kefir in me Goes deep goes right through your stomach and boom right into your small intestines Centuries ago this is how the herding people would consume their cultured products big bowls of it They would guzzle it Centenarians of the Caucusus Nomadic horsemen of the northern Caucasus mountains who drank the stuff reportedly lived past the century mark Some think the probiotic bacteria in kefir might be the reason why but the only scientific proof of kefir s medical benefits is a 2003 Ohio State University study that showed it curbed flatulence in those with lactose intolerance Reported rare side effects of drinking kefir include bloating headache and acne Still today it s the most popular fermented milk in Russia and in Uzbekistan horse bladder saddle bags full of it still swing over front doors You hang it in your doorway says Taylor and everyone who comes through the doorway slaps it coming and going to shake it and agitate it and that makes it grow faster It s alive It grows because it s a living organism that you have to take care of every day Real kefir is something that you keep like a pet But Taylor says like many of the best things in life real kefir can t be bought God can t put kefir in a bottle says Taylor The stuff that s in the store that s called kefir is not kefir Demonstrating how he says anyone can make it at home Taylor strains foamy liquid through a colander to isolate kefir grains He ll share some with workshop participants Pass that around You can get a smell get an idea We re going to put those in little bottles for you The grains are a gelatinous mass of bacteria and yeast a symbiotic community of microorganisms The small irregular opaque clumps look like cottage cheese or cauliflower Once plopped into a quantity of milk kefir grains ferment the liquid Then they re strained out and added to fresh milk for use in successive batches A renewable source of nutrition Kefir is a self perpetuating food source of somewhat mysterious origin It s believed that all the kefir grains in the world today are babies of a mother culture that came out of the Caucasus mountains thousands of years ago Warren Taylor calls it an enigma It only exists because of human beings but nobody can make it The most sophisticated dairy lab in the world can t make you a real kefir culture You have to get it from somebody A question at the workshop Is there a ratio of grains to milk Good question Taylor replied It depends on the temperature that it s going to be growing at because the warmer it is the less kefir you need to milk to have it grow out in the same period of time How vigorous are the grains how good is the milk All of these things So you just kind of get to know your kefir Sharing the grains and the method You can drink it plain but Taylor brought a blender and made the workshop participants a kefir smoothie We re going to put fresh strawberries and blueberries I like bananas Warren Taylor learned about kefir at college in a dairy technology class but it took two years of searching before he could get grains shipped to him from Holland That was the beginning of my kefir culture and this is the same culture I m going to share with you all today So I ve been drinking this since 1978 How many people has he shared his culture with In the last nearly 40 years thousands I think it s a very fundamental human idea to share You re going to give us some today Yes What am I going to do when I go home Put it in milk Well how much Three parts milk to one part grains How long do you let it sit Until it coagulates until it makes a gel until it has acidity Like two hours Well 24 Much longer than the 4 to 6 hours it takes to ferment yogurt Kefir buttermilk sour cream says Taylor take more like 24 hours room temperature Slightly alcoholic when ripe Letting it sit even longer on your kitchen counter is called ripening and that s what Rachel Baillieul often does If you allow kefir to go on long enough you might get a little bit of an alcoholic taste she says or an effervescence Baillieul is an urban homesteader farming on two acres of soil in Columbus I m a home cook who is unafraid to try anything That s what started me down this road of fermentation She s teaching a workshop on the culinary aspects of kefir So this is kefir that s actually gone a little bit far I forgot to put it in the fridge when I came yesterday So it needed one less day The grains are edible too A question comes up about how to handle the grains Do you typically always filter them out prior to consuming the kefir No They are consumable And you have to decide am I going to eat them Am I going to press them together to make a sort of cheese Am I going to feed them to my animals Am I going to pass them to friends She says they can be stored in a little bit of milk or water in the refrigerator I just recently pulled some out that I had just in water for about three months They were still alive Baillieuil belongs to a growing kefir community I m one of those crazy people who has cultures So if you need things let me know Snowville Creamery s Warren Taylor believes the local foods movement along with a new reverence for lost arts creates the perfect climate for the growth of a shared kefir culture We

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=1 (2016-02-17)
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  • At Least 4 Good Reasons to Boost Soil Organic Matter, and a Chance to Learn How to Do It | OEFFA News
    various stages of decomposition Islam said its benefits include Providing food energy and enzymes for soil microbes The microbes boost plants growth and health Providing a reservoir of essential plant nutrients that support good yielding high quality nutritious crops Being a catalyst for regulating the soil s ecological functions The functions include buffering the soil s acid alkaline balance or pH They also include improving the cation exchange capacity which helps the soil store nutrients until needed by plants and microbes Improving the soil s structure and moisture retention Better soil structure improves drainage during rains and wet times Better moisture retention helps plants during drought Big picture soil organic matter also takes carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and stores it in the soil Excess atmospheric CO2 is one of the causes of climate change All about tools and best practices Islam said people who take the workshop will learn how to increase soil organic matter levels by using among other things compost manure cover crops and soil amendments such as gypsum zeolite and leonardite or black carbon They ll also get instruction on how to use an online soil organic matter calculator to monitor those levels The knowledge can help greatly improve soil organic matter content and consequently soil health he said Organic farmers are striving to reduce their operating costs maintain soil organic matter and increase farm profits Islam said Often this results in intensive tillage based practices that provide short term yield gains but lose soil organic matter and productivity over time The workshop is meant to reverse those losses he said with the goal being organic farms that aren t just good for the environment but are viable and profitable or even more so as businesses The research team s members include farmers experts from

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2249 (2016-02-17)
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  • Farming is a public service and we need more of it, says TedX talker Lindsey Lusher Shute | OEFFA News
    up near Columbus where my dad was a public school teacher and my mother a nurse Other than visits to my grandfather s farm the state fair and an overly shaded vegetable plot I had little exposure to farm life Why did you become a farmer I became a farmer because I fell in love with one My husband Ben and I met in New York City where we built a community garden in Brooklyn He had just returned from a farming apprenticeship in Oregon and eventually decided to start his own farm upstate I was so inspired by Ben and the innovative and entrepreneurial farmers in the region that I eventually moved up But in all honesty outside of occasional chores I do very little farming these days With the National Young Farmers Coalition and our girls at home the farming is left to Ben and our incredible crew What is your farming philosophy Farming is public service That means nurturing our land protecting our water respecting our workers and growing the best food for our communities Why is there a shortage of farmers For several generations we have been losing young people in agriculture With farm incomes declining and better prospects elsewhere many farm families encouraged their kids to look to other careers The good food movement has reversed this trend somewhat by bringing kids back to the farm as well as inspiring thousands of newcomers but structural obstacles get in the way With land prices on the rise student debt and market challenges it s extremely difficult for many young people to get started and succeed in agriculture Who should be a farmer Everyone If we are going to save our farmer population every kid should contemplate a farm career Even growing up here in Ohio no one ever talked to me about the possibility of becoming a farmer That s no good Farming is the opportunity to make a decent income serve a community be your own boss and get outside Kids should put farmer right up there on their lists with doctor teacher and President of the United States What do you mean by decent income What about those declining farm wages With affordable land access to capital appropriate scale and strong demand a farmer can make a good living The National Young Farmers Coalition believes that farmers should be in the position to support themselves and their families while farming full time What s the best thing government can do to create more farms Protect the affordability of farmland One of the most difficult obstacles for young farmers is finding affordable farmland and the problem is only growing worse Governments can take action by conserving farmland with working farm easements and creating new tax incentives to help transition land What s the best thing consumers can do to help create more farms We ve all heard it a million times but buy local Where I live here in New York it s estimated that

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2247 (2016-02-17)
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  • February’s Statewide Sustainable Food Conference to Feature Cleveland Chef and Farmers | OEFFA News
    National Organic Coalition Research is necessary to keep the country s soils healthy many said and to attract new farmers OEFFA has been working on this for a number of years said Mike Laughlin a southern Ohio farmer from Johnstown We ve been developing young farmer educational programs mentorships and we even have a couple of different loan programs to help individuals get started We re starting to see some energy from that program and it really gives me a lot of hope for the future Farmers and homegrowers can also get advice at the conference from these principals among many others in more than 100 workshops Ben Bebenroth farmer and chef of Spice Kitchen Bar who will talk about growing marketing and cooking unusual vegetables Elizabeth Kucinich Rodale Institute board member on going beyond the issue of genetic engineering to focus on soil healthy agriculture Laura DeYoung Mannig of Urban Shepherd and Spicy Lamb Farm Peninsula on producing consistent meat quality George Remington of Morningside Farm Hinckley on a panel discussing biofertilizers Jake Trethewey Maplestar Farm Auburn Township on avoiding pesticide drift from nearby farms Maggie Fitzpatrick of the refugee project at Ohio City Farm Cleveland on expanding the ethnic crop market and Jacqueline Kowalski of Ohio State University Extension in Cuyahoga County on a topic to be determined Matt Herbruck of Birdsong Farm Hiram on the potential of community supported agriculture programs CSAs A former southern Ohioan will deliver the keynote address on Saturday Lindsey Lusher Shute of the National Young Farmers Coalition now a New York State farmer will talk about lobbying for more help for young farmers John Ikerd speaks on Sunday The farming advocate and critic of confined animal feeding operations wrote several books including Sustainable Capitalism A Matter of Common Sense Small Farms are

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2245 (2016-02-17)
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  • Land, Money Obstacles for Next Generation of OH Farmers | OEFFA News
    remains one of the major challenges Shute says while the country has grown by 200 million people since 1920 there are 28 million fewer farmers And she ll be in Ohio next month to discuss the tools and resources needed to support beginning farmers Shute is the keynote speaker at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s annual conference in Granville Feb 12 through the 14 Shute explains many beginning farmers want to give back to the land and sustainability is at the core of their motivation Some come from a long line of farmers but she says the majority are starting from scratch Their presence is very welcome in the farm community because many farm kids have not been encouraged to stay on the farm in the past few generations Shute says And so this influx of new farm entrepreneurs is very necessary and vital for the farm economy U S Department of Agriculture data shows almost 30 percent of Ohio farmers are age 65 or older and just seven percent are younger than 35 years of age Shute says agriculture needs young people to ensure the growth of local food systems If we don t do something about this gap we have and to make sure that this beautiful farmland in Ohio and across the nation says Shute If we re not sure that s going to go to another working farm family then we will not have family farms in the future and we will not have food security And one policy measure that would help says Shute is the Young Farmers Success Act of 2016 It would add farmers to a public loan forgiveness program Post navigation Sustainable Agriculture Author John Ikerd to Keynote Ohio s Largest Food and Farm Conference February s Statewide Sustainable

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2242 (2016-02-17)
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  • Sustainable Agriculture Author, John Ikerd, to Keynote Ohio’s Largest Food and Farm Conference | OEFFA News
    can see the failure of the grand experiment of industrial agriculture It s time for fundamental change Ikerd writes Ikerd will also lead two workshops during the conference Deep Sustainability Deeper than Reducing Reusing Recycling and Renewing on Saturday afternoon and Practical Radical Ideas for Restructuring Farming and Food Production Systems on Sunday morning John Ikerd challenges us to think more deeply about sustainability and sustainable agriculture said OEFFA Program Director Renee Hunt His vision for the future deeply rooted in more than 30 years of experience in agricultural science and economics is inspiring Ikerd will speak as part of the state s largest sustainable food and farm conference an event which draws more than 1 200 attendees from across Ohio and the country In addition to Ikerd this year s conference will feature keynote speaker Lindsey Lusher Shute on Saturday February 13 more than 90 educational workshops three in depth pre conference workshops on Friday February 12 a trade show activities for children and teens locally sourced and from scratch meals a raffle book sales and signings a seed swap and Saturday evening entertainment For more information about the conference or to register click here Our Sponsors Dickinson Wright PLLC Granville Village Schools Greenacres Foundation Jorgensen Farms Natural Awakenings Central Ohio Cincinnati and Toledo Organic Valley Snowville Creamery Albert Lea Seed Co Casa Nueva Earth Tools Eban Bakehouse Edible Cleveland Great River Organics Green BEAN Delivery Green Field Farms Lucky Cat Bakery Metro Cuisine Mustard Seed Market and Cafe Ohio Hills Biochar Raisin Rack Natural Food Market Stauf s Coffee Roasters Sunopta Swainway Urban FarmAg Credit ACA Andelain Fields C TEC of Licking County Curly Tail Organic Farm DNO Produce Eden Foods Edible Ohio Valley Hocking College Culinary Arts Program McClenaghan School of Hospitality Kevin Morgan Studio Law Office

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2232 (2016-02-17)
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  • Beginning Farmer Advocate to Keynote Ohio’s Largest Food and Farm Conference | OEFFA News
    husband Benjamin own and manage Hearty Roots Community Farm a 70 acre farm in New York s Hudson River Valley They grow about 25 acres of certified organic vegetables and care for a flock of laying hens and a dozen pigs which are marketed through a 900 member community support agriculture program In a 2013 Tedx Talk Shute pointed out that there are 28 million fewer farmers in the U S than in 1920 and the country has grown by 200 million people If we are going to rebuild American agriculture provide a pathway of opportunity for people of modest means to become farmers in the United States and for us all to feel and experience the benefits of all these farmers caring for the land will bring then we need to invest in the next generations of farmers said Shute who as Executive Director and co founder of NYFC represents mobilizes and engages young farmers to ensure their success On Friday February 12 Shute will facilitate a full day in depth pre conference event designed for beginning farmers titled Answering the Call to Farm On Saturday morning Shute will also lead a one hour workshop Is DC Helping Sustainable Farmers What s Happening in Congress That s Affecting You We re excited to welcome Lindsey to this year s conference so we can shine a spotlight on the resources tools and support these young farmers need to succeed along with the policy changes that the future of farming requires said OEFFA Program Director Renee Hunt Shute will speak as part of the state s largest sustainable food and farm conference an event which draws more than 1 200 attendees from across Ohio and the country In addition to Shute this year s conference will feature keynote speaker John Ikerd

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2227 (2016-02-17)
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