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  • Flower-farm open house touts ‘local,’ sustainable | OEFFA News
    give to loved ones to express joy love sadness and remorse is something the Adamses don t take lightly And they want people to share those emotions with local products People are going to come and see what the other option is for flowers to see why local flowers are just as important as local food Mr Adams said We want people to be buying local flowers whether they re from us or they re from other growers The U S cut flower industry accounts for 7 billion to 8 billion in sales in a year according to the Society of American Florists but only a fraction of flowers come from local farms Imports make up 79 percent of the U S supply of cut flowers and greens according to the California Cut Flower Commission Adams said flowers from foreign countries might have been sprayed with chemicals that are harmful to consumers For us sustainability is a farm that can continue to provide fresh quality flowers without synthetic fertilizers and chemical inputs he said Sunny Meadows does not use herbicides and it uses compost as fertilizer Mrs Adams said The farm also uses beneficial insects to control pests Eric Pawlowski the association s sustainable agriculture educator said he has benefited from the tours because farmers often provide tips that can make or break a crop of any size It s not so much the how or the do but it s the what not to do he said In addition to the annual farm open houses the association has a number of farm tours and workshops which started in June and will end in late October More information is at www oeffa org Lindsey Baker 32 a florist in Morrow Ohio said she was interested in learning from Adams because

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2100 (2016-02-17)
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  • Farm Tours | OEFFA News
    on the energy to transport those flowers Alwin Chan Frederick 36 said he was impressed by the farm s sustainable practices Supporting kinds of small businesses like theirs is important for the local community he said Tours Shine Light on Ohio Sustainable Food Production June 1 2015 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Lauren By Mary Kuhlman Public News Service 5 26 2015 PHOTO The 2015 Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series kicks off in June offering people across Ohio the chance to experience life on the farm and learn new skills Photo courtesy of Sunseed Farm COLUMBUS Ohio A lot of work goes into the production of fruit vegetables and other fresh food sold at markets and grocery stores and this summer Ohioans can get an up close and personal look at the process The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA is sponsoring 15 tours and nine workshops during its 2015 Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series Communications coordinator Lauren Ketcham says it s a unique experience for both adults and children To see a tomato ripening on the vine in the field or to be able to pull a carrot out of the ground and really tangibly see how that food gets from the field to their dinner table she says Tours this year offer a variety of activities including the opportunity to walk in the footsteps of a shepherd view organic dairy production and sample local meats cheeses and preserves As part of the series there will be a one day Women Grow Ohio event at 17 locations and a benefit dinner in the fall Ketcham says OEFFA has offered the tours for more than 35 years to give growers and non growers the opportunity to learn about sustainable foods produced in Ohio communities The more consumers know about how their food is grown the better prepared there are to make informed choices about who to support with their food dollars says Ketcham The tours are a good way to gain this knowledge Ketcham says Ohio s sustainable farmers and producers use innovative practices and techniques and during the tours they will share their experiences She says the workshops allow folks to delve even deeper Some of those topics this summer are going to include learning how to design and install your own solar photo voltaic system small plot market farming urban agriculture dairy herd health farm machinery she says The Ohio State University Sustainable Agriculture Team and the Clintonville Farmers Market are sponsoring additional tours OEFFA reveals organic Ohio farm tour schedule for 2015 from goat cheese to chickens June 1 2015 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Sustainable Agriculture in the News Lauren By Debbi Snook The Plain Dealer 5 12 15 CLEVELAND Ohio Time to get your proverbial boots dusty Fifteen organic farm tours from chickens to vegetables and grains are part of this year s series organized by the Columbus based Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA Northeast Ohioans won t have to travel far for several of them including The Farmers Table a farm to table dinner Aug 30 at Maplestar Farm in Geauga County Muddy Fork Farm in Wayne County kicks off the schedule on June 3 with a demonstration of its pastured poultry research On July 19 MorningSide Farm in Medina County opens its vegetable growing operation to everyone especially those who buy from them at Cleveland area farmers markets Nine events will turn into learning workshops including poultry processing October 11 at Tea Hills Farms in Ashland County a five day solar energy class starting October 12 in Wayne County and an urban agriculture exchange Oct 24 at Ohio City Farm Cleveland This is a great chance for everyone interested in local foods to turn over a new leaf said OEFFA representative Lauren Ketcham They can learn how sustainably produced food is grown and connect with others who share a passion for sustainable agriculture They also can learn she said about the life of a shepherd how to control weeds without chemicals see draft horses make sorghum into sweet syrup sample local meats cheeses and jams and butcher their own poultry A list of all the programs plus details and a statewide map can be found online Twenty minutes with organic grain farmer Dean McIlvaine August 18 2014 Farm Tours Lauren Farm and Dairy by Chris Kick 8 13 14 WEST SALEM Ohio When you think of organic you probably think of small scale farms of about 100 acres or less But that s not always the case Dean McIlvaine of Twin Parks Organic Farm in Wayne County has operated an 850 acre organic grain farm since 1985 He welcomed guests to his farm Aug 1 as part of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association s annual summer sustainability tour He grows organic corn and soybeans spelt oats wheat rye and clover and markets them nationally and internationally His father Dale McIlvaine bought the farm in the mid 1970s and the family farmed conventionally up until 1985 At this same time Dale owned the area John Deere dealership and wanted to be more involved with that business so Dean took over the farm Going organic Dean transitioned to an organic operation following his college dream and his personal beliefs that organic food is healthier and better for the environment The farm name Twin Parks comes from the two Interstate rest area parks located on the farm Today Dean farms alongside his girlfriend Mona Frey and he s constantly trying new things and exploring new markets During the OEFFA tour he showed some plots of organic no till corn that he grew for the first time and talked about how he s using cover crops to help control weeds and keep nutrients in the soil He also explained some of his farm equipment like his cover crop roller which rolls and flattens cover crops prior to planting the main crops and his organic weed puller a mechanical attachment that mounts on the front of his tractor and pulls and crimps weeds in between the rows Following the tour Farm and Dairy caught up with Dean to talk one on one about his operation and the state of organics Q Why organic Why did you make the decision to leave conventional A I have had a strong aversion to the health concerns My father and grandfather were both active conventional farmers with lots of exposure to synthetic fertilizers and chemicals and both died early from associated related illnesses leukemia and lymphoma There was lots of exposure there that was toxic to them I was never really a fan of processed foods Once I got a taste of whole grains and real food I recognized how much better it tasted and how much better I felt The contamination starts with our air our water and our soil And if we want to live a healthier more productive life we need to clean up our environment Q What are the biggest challenges to being an organic grain operator A The biggest challenges begin with finding adequate fertility and learning how to manage the microbial life in the soil to facilitate that fertility And dealing with the weeds and just learning how the whole system works that we can do it with the resources that nature has provided instead of from the toxic things that we ve used in the conventional world Q How have people s attitudes changed toward what you re doing A They re much more receptive People are very curious anymore Even in the midst of our under achievement there s lots of interest and curiosity People recognize the cost of producing food is ever increasing as our world s resources are forever diminishing and the beauty of the organic system is that we try to recycle nutrients that are available more effectively and try and enhance the biology of the soil which can help that transfer of nutrients from the soil to the plants Q What have been some of your biggest successes as an organic grain producer A Personally the times we ve had good corn crops or good clean soybean fields But learning how to replicate that over all 850 acres has been the challenge to do so consistently It is sort of a delicate balance and if you try to short circuit the system it will backfire in a hurry And there s always new challenges with the changing weed pressures and changing climate pressures What worked last year or three years ago may or may not work this year So we have to be forever looking forward to anticipate what we need to make things grow the best Q What new things are you trying or what things would you like to try A I ve always had an interest since college days to have a more value added production system or vertically integrated system So adding value to the crops that we grow is of interest He does do some of that by cleaning his own grain and dehulling etc for specific markets We ve really gone out on a limb with organic no till in corn It was one thing to make the leap into organics but to do so with the row crops is equally challenging But it matches the overall goal of enhancing soil life by minimizing soil tillage Q What would you tell others who want to begin growing crops organically A Do your homework Take a soil test to see where you are and address the long term needs of your crops Soil drainage and soil balancing are quite a trick and an art and a science that are of upmost importance Think broadly about diversifying And try to incorporate animal components in as much as possible I think there s that cycle of life that is helpful for every farm It goes along with the idea of recycling and using what s nearby Q Do you think you would ever go back to conventional A I think about it when the weeds get taller than the crops But at the end of the day I know that things aren t always better in that camp either Especially with the problems with the Roundup and the GMO grains The costs are outlandish for that technology and the results are short sighted and short term There s too many long term costs of going back to conventional Q What is the state of organic farming today A It s strong it s healthy it s vibrant it s growing It s pretty exciting to be a part of and especially to see the new young people get involved and even poor people who want a better life This is one of the easiest most cost effective ways they can do something for themselves that improves their life now and in the long run The interest that people have in growing their own food and doing it with a minimum or lack of chemicals is very encouraging The hard part is replicating it over a bigger area and more acres and day in and day out OEFFA Tour Stop Harmonious Homestead June 30 2014 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Lauren This Week News June 2014 This Week News previews a farm tour part of OEFFA s 2014 Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop series at Harmonious Homestead a community oriented urban homestead in Columbus Ohio The tour took place on June 22 2014 Click here to take a video tour of the farm Ohioans Can Get The Dirt on Organic Growing from Farmers June 12 2014 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Lauren By Mary Kuhlman Public News Service May 27 2014 COLUMBUS Ohio Getting organic and sustainable foods from the field to the dinner table takes a lot of knowledge effort and care and Ohioans can get an inside look at how it all happens This summer the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association is sponsoring 15 tours and six workshops across the Buckeye State as part of the group s 2014 farm tour series Spokeswoman Lauren Ketchum says it s a unique opportunity The great thing is that farmers know all the dirt so during this summer series they re sharing that knowledge about how sustainably produced food is grown The tours are also designed to help farmers and gardeners learn from each other so that they can improve their production and marketing techniques Ketchum says Beyond just seeing how food is grown consumers can learn about rooftop gardening sustainable flowers solar electric use farming with horses and more Most of the tours and workshops are free and open to the public and will take place rain or shine Fulton Farms in Miami County is among those opening its gates Ketchum says allowing people to glimpse its operation They re a diverse family owned organic vegetable farm that is operating a pretty large community supported agriculture program which feeds more than 400 families People will have a chance to see more than 30 acres of organic field production she explains Ketchum says they see great turnout at the tours as demand for fresh local foods grows and consumers want to make informed choices We really encourage growers educators and conscientious eaters to attend the tours They can learn about sustainable agriculture in a real world setting from farmers with years of practical experience she says The tours have been offered for more than three decades and this year the Ohio State University Sustainable Agriculture Team is sponsoring 10 additional tours More information on the tours is at www oeffa org Creamery is first stop in series of farm tours June 10 2013 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Lauren By Mary Vanac The Columbus Dispatch 6 8 13 Consumers quest for more locally produced food is sending them back to the farm This year s Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series which starts today at Snowville Creamery in Pomeroy offers learning opportunities for both consumers and farmers As consumer demand for fresh locally produced food and farm products has grown there has been a desire to reconnect with the farm and understand how that food gets from the field to the table said Lauren Ketcham communications coordinator for the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association which has run the tours for more than three decades In addition to the Meigs County dairy this year s organic and ecological farms stops include a sustainable cut flower farm in Franklin County a Licking County organic vegetable farm a Fairfield County beef farm that markets its jerky and snack sticks directly to consumers and an organic farm that is doing a canning workshop Most of the tours are free and open to the public a few charge fees and require registration This year Ohio State University Extension and the Coalition of Ohio Land Trusts will offer seven of the 24 stops on the tour while OEFFA will handle the remaining 17 stops Ketcham said We feel that consumer education is an important part of our mission she said The more consumers know about how their food is grown the better prepared they are to make informed choices about who to support with their local food dollars The tours also are designed to help farmers and gardeners learn from each other so they can improve their production and marketing techniques and grow their operations she said Ketcham is looking forward to the July 28 tour of Sunny Meadows Flower Farm in Columbus and to the July 21 tour of Northridge Organic Farm in Johnstown Mike and Laura Laughlin are turning their farm over to young farmer Joseph Swain The tour series is all about offering farmers alternatives said Mike Hogan an OSU Extension educator in Fairfield County Our goal is to give people ideas to make their farm operations more sustainable Hogan said We give them ideas about alternative enterprises alternative production systems like grazing or no till and alternative marketing systems The July tour of Berry Family Farm in Pleasantville shows how one producer has added facets to its operation Hogan said They re adding value to beef products selling jerky summer sausage and snack sticks directly to consumers as well as marketing freezer beef At Snowville Creamery owner Warren Taylor put his workers through their public speaking paces yesterday in preparation for today s open house from 1 to 4 p m Snowville supplies milk cream yogurt and creme fraiche to Jeni s Splendid Ice Creams in Columbus and select grocers from Ohio to Virginia This year we have organized ourselves into a dozen functional areas each of which will have a Snowville Creamery team member explaining that area Taylor said Taylor spent a career designing and engineering milk production facilities around the world for the nation s largest dairy companies He said he started Snowville as a reaction against the few large dairies which he thinks are too powerful I have long since decided that Snowville Creamery s purpose goes far beyond milk Taylor said It goes to advocating for representative democracy in America For a full tour listing visit www oeffa org Go Behind the Scenes of Ohio s Sustainable Growing May 28 2013 Farm Tours OEFFA in the News Lauren May 28 2013 Ohio News Service Mary Kuhlman COLUMBUS Ohio All those who have ever wanted to see how their food is produced can get a sneak peek in Ohio this summer Over two dozen sustainable and organic farms are being featured as part of a farm tour series According to Lauren Ketcham communications coordinator for the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association the more consumers know the better prepared they are to make informed choices about who to support with their food dollars And she added the participating farmers are more than happy to let Ohioans see the inner workings

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?cat=7 (2016-02-17)
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  • U.S. House of Representatives Denies Americans the Right to Know | OEFFA News
    accurately dubbed the Deny Americans the Right to Know DARK Act the bill flies in the face of public opinion by denying citizens the right to choose what they eat and feed their families and throws out all state efforts to label genetically engineered GE food such as the laws already passed in Maine Connecticut and Vermont This bill s absurdity is immense Although proponents say voluntary labeling is the solution no companies have voluntarily opted to label their foods as GE The Dark Act also ends states rights to regulate food labeling and even more appallingly it allows GE foods to be labeled as natural The House placed the interests of large corporate agribusiness above the interests of an overwhelming majority of the people they represent who have consistently asked for the right to know if food contains GE ingredients A poll conducted by OEFFA in February found that 87 percent of Ohio voters across partisan lines support GE labeling I encourage all Ohioans to take the opportunity to view how their representative voted on the bill and to let them know where they stand on this issue A similar measure has yet to be introduced in the Senate and is expected to face a much tougher battle so there s still a chance for the public to make its voice heard Post navigation Farm to Table Dinner Comes to Northeast Ohio The Farmers Table Celebrates Ohio Farms and Flavors Flower farm open house touts local sustainable Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2096 (2016-02-17)
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  • OEFFA reveals organic Ohio farm tour schedule for 2015, from goat cheese to chickens | OEFFA News
    pastured poultry research On July 19 MorningSide Farm in Medina County opens its vegetable growing operation to everyone especially those who buy from them at Cleveland area farmers markets Nine events will turn into learning workshops including poultry processing October 11 at Tea Hills Farms in Ashland County a five day solar energy class starting October 12 in Wayne County and an urban agriculture exchange Oct 24 at Ohio City Farm Cleveland This is a great chance for everyone interested in local foods to turn over a new leaf said OEFFA representative Lauren Ketcham They can learn how sustainably produced food is grown and connect with others who share a passion for sustainable agriculture They also can learn she said about the life of a shepherd how to control weeds without chemicals see draft horses make sorghum into sweet syrup sample local meats cheeses and jams and butcher their own poultry A list of all the programs plus details and a statewide map can be found online Post navigation Interviews from OEFFA s Annual Conference Tours Shine Light on Ohio Sustainable Food Production Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2059 (2016-02-17)
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  • Ohio homesteaders and sustainability advocates feel good about kefir | OEFFA News
    can t put kefir in a bottle says Taylor The stuff that s in the store that s called kefir is not kefir Demonstrating how he says anyone can make it at home Taylor strains foamy liquid through a colander to isolate kefir grains He ll share some with workshop participants Pass that around You can get a smell get an idea We re going to put those in little bottles for you The grains are a gelatinous mass of bacteria and yeast a symbiotic community of microorganisms The small irregular opaque clumps look like cottage cheese or cauliflower Once plopped into a quantity of milk kefir grains ferment the liquid Then they re strained out and added to fresh milk for use in successive batches A renewable source of nutrition Kefir is a self perpetuating food source of somewhat mysterious origin It s believed that all the kefir grains in the world today are babies of a mother culture that came out of the Caucasus mountains thousands of years ago Warren Taylor calls it an enigma It only exists because of human beings but nobody can make it The most sophisticated dairy lab in the world can t make you a real kefir culture You have to get it from somebody A question at the workshop Is there a ratio of grains to milk Good question Taylor replied It depends on the temperature that it s going to be growing at because the warmer it is the less kefir you need to milk to have it grow out in the same period of time How vigorous are the grains how good is the milk All of these things So you just kind of get to know your kefir Sharing the grains and the method You can drink it plain but Taylor brought a blender and made the workshop participants a kefir smoothie We re going to put fresh strawberries and blueberries I like bananas Warren Taylor learned about kefir at college in a dairy technology class but it took two years of searching before he could get grains shipped to him from Holland That was the beginning of my kefir culture and this is the same culture I m going to share with you all today So I ve been drinking this since 1978 How many people has he shared his culture with In the last nearly 40 years thousands I think it s a very fundamental human idea to share You re going to give us some today Yes What am I going to do when I go home Put it in milk Well how much Three parts milk to one part grains How long do you let it sit Until it coagulates until it makes a gel until it has acidity Like two hours Well 24 Much longer than the 4 to 6 hours it takes to ferment yogurt Kefir buttermilk sour cream says Taylor take more like 24 hours room temperature Slightly alcoholic when ripe Letting

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=2033 (2016-02-17)
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  • Great River Organics Looks to Build Name for Organic Produce in Central Ohio | OEFFA News
    the standards was an important part of the foundation Welly says it gives them transparency in their processes and a clear stance on what they stand for as they broach multiple markets Currently the operation is focused mainly on the direct to consumer market making their produce accessible through their multi farm CSA known as The Great River Market Bag The eight product CSA is a mix of everyday staples and a few unique items We only grew a few items for GRO in 2014 which meant we could focus on doing it really well says Kristy Ryan of Clay Hill Farms We think the quality of produce going into the CSA is phenomenal because each farm gets the freedom to grow the items that they specialize in growing The CSA is delivered to about 20 community partners mostly corporations and includes the likes of Nationwide Cardinal Health and Limited Brands GRO s collaborative effort allows the organization to extend a traditional 20 week CSA into 30 weeks starting in June and ending around Christmas which means closer to year round fresh local produce The group is working on some other CSA options like every other week pickup or a peak season selection We ve taken a lot of feedback from our customers and we re trying to give people a wider number of options to take part Welly says Although the CSA is the anchor of GRO wholesale of certified organic produce is in the long term plans The organization is just trying to be thoughtful in the way that they grow A lot of people want to buy our product but we believe it s smarter for us to work in the framework of what our farmers are capable of right now Moore says It ensures that customers are getting the highest quality of goods And it takes time to expand as a farming operation In addition to a steady outlet for their produce member farms are also finding huge marketing advantages as a part of GRO Great River provides the farmer a network of support and marketing ability that opens up an array of opportunities that otherwise would not be available to them as an individual organic producer says Ben Dilbone of Sunbeam Family Farm Ryan echoes Dilbone s sentiments Being a young growing farm in rural area While it is very nice to live a quiet rural life the downside is we don t have access to good markets Ryan says Joining GRO allowed us to pursue our farm dream and gain market share We can enjoy the stability and benefits that CSAs offer farms without the pressure of going it alone especially this early in our career Overall GRO wants to bring awareness to and help grow the local food system Local agriculture needs as much support as it can get to maintain economic viability and compete with the pressures of cheaply produced corporate organics that are imported from other countries that we see flooding

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1981 (2016-02-17)
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  • Farm trend watcher has high hopes for Ohio farmers in the new food movement | OEFFA News
    more effort on the part of people who seek out good food who will pay more for good food We do it now Look at the growth of farmers markets And if you ve ever shopped at a farmers market you can buy food cheaper elsewhere If you ve ever gone to a farm to fork table restaurant You can buy stuff a lot cheaper than that But you can t buy it any better You can t buy it any healthier You can t buy it and have more satisfaction And I think that s what the new food movement is about Last year about 80 percent of U S consumers bought organic at least sometimes And there s been explosive growth in the number of farmers markets But Guebert says conventional farmers try to downplay it I read just this past week how organic farmers markets must be worried because they only grew 8 last year where in the past they ve averaged 12 and 16 years ago there was 16 growth Wouldn t the corn and soy bean farmers love the fact that their markets grew 8 last year Of course they would So that s big Ag s message to counteract the great story that we see in farmers markets and in the growth of organic sales We re just going back to goodness Good easy straight forward uncomplicated delicious food Where Big Ag comes in But is anybody holding us back from going back What about Big Ag what about Big Food Well they would like to have a real impact on current food trends And in fact they re really trying Big Ag would like to see those choices limited And by that I mean they don t want labeling They don t really want GMO labeling for sure because they say it will work against them Well prove it Prove it Until then I think giving consumers the right to know what they re eating is important Guebert s been watching the trends for a long time He s been writing his column for about 22 years now When did he see the light bulb go off in people s heads When did this happen this food revolution I think we ve worked very hard my generation your generation to be sure that our children are very well educated And we raised them to be independent Well what we raised were smart kids We raised them in a manner that they were curious and questioning and that they sought out what they thought was good options and made informed choices That s all they re making They re making informed choices They re looking at food and they re going Well I think I ll have green beans tonight and I ll go to the farmers market He s seen it in his own family His daughter lived in D C and shopped at the Eastern Market on Capitol Hill It was on

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1941 (2016-02-17)
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  • Some Ohio Communities are Not Pleased About Proposed Pipelines | OEFFA News
    the local public benefit of the development is questionable since the pipeline would transport natural gas from shale gas supplies produced in eastern Ohio up to Canada Groups are forming to try to get the pipeline it rerouted to areas where existing pipelines already are in place The Nexus pipeline is in early planning and its developer has said it is possible it could be moved or its path could be shifted It s not just the pipeline that Billman says is a nuisance but also its construction maintenance and accompanying compressor stations She says the possibility of accidents spills or explosions poses a real risk to organic farmers whose land could be compromised by chemicals or toxins The people who are close to these things their air quality water quality and soil is just being devastated says Billman That s food and it comes up in the food and it just draws right from the soil and from the air Supporters say the pipelines will help drillers get a better price for their gas by carrying it to areas north where there is greater demand While Billman says she understands the need for natural gas for energy she says there are other ways We know how to do things differently and there are the alternative fuels coming along solar and wind primarily and we are taking our farm in that direction she says We will be petroleum free on our farm by 2020 Other proposed projects in Ohio include ANR East Pipeline a 500 mile line to Michigan and the 800 mile Rover Pipeline which would run to Canada Post navigation Genetically Modified Crops Continue to be Controversial Scientist and Biotechnology Expert Doug Gurian Sherman to Keynote Ohio s Largest Food and Farm Conference Archives Select Month February 2016

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1838 (2016-02-17)
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