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  • Lauren | OEFFA News | Page 3
    70 processors across 10 states But the reality is that farmers and organic food processors have to go through the certification process every year Goland says As a whole we are keeping up but it represents an area of growth since organics is growing Goland adds certifiers are calling for clarification and more regulation in areas like animal welfare hydroponic crops and beauty products You will see some cosmetics or body care products out on the market that are labeled organics There aren t really standards for these she says There are more than 730 certified organic operations in Ohio and nearly 20 000 in the U S Nationally organic products generate 39 billion in sales Press Conference to Celebrate 25 Years of Certified Organic Standards November 17 2015 OEFFA Press Releases Lauren FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 17 2015 CONTACT Amalie Lipstreu OEFFA Policy Program Coordinator 614 421 2022 Ext 208 policy oeffa org Lauren Ketcham OEFFA Communications Coordinator 614 421 2022 Ext 203 lauren oeffa org What The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA is holding a virtual press conference to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Organic Foods Production Act OFPA which was signed into law by President George H W Bush on November 28 1990 A moderated panel of expert speakers will provide statements about the history of the organic movement and standards and the growth of the organic sector A question and answer session will follow to allow members of the media the opportunity to explore the issues further Prior to OFPA there were no consistent standards or regulations to define organic agriculture The first certification programs were developed by states and agencies resulting in a patchwork of standards A grassroots movement grew to develop a national organic standard to help facilitate interstate marketing which eventually resulted in the passage of OFPA and the creation of the National Organic Program which established federal regulations defining uniform standards for organic farming practices and labeling and a third party verification process to ensure compliance uniformity and transparency After years of work and public involvement final rules were written and implemented in 2002 Today there are more than 730 certified organic operations in Ohio and nearly 19 500 in the U S Consumer demand for organic food and fiber continues to grow Organic food sales have increased by an average of 10 percent per year since 2010 and sales of organic products soared to 39 1 billion in 2014 When Monday November 30 10 am ET Please RSVP to lauren oeffa org Include your name and the name of the outlet you represent Where Members of the media can join this virtual press conference by phone from the convenience of their home or office Call 712 432 0390 and then enter access code 805354 Who Carol Goland OEFFA Executive Director and event moderator OEFFA is one of the oldest and largest organic certification agencies in the country OEFFA certified to state standards prior to OFPA and worked toward the development of a national program Liana Hoodes National Organic Coalition Advisor Liana is the Co Chair of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York former director of the National Organic Coalition and previous Organic Policy Coordinator for the National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture Kathleen Merrigan Executive Director of Sustainability George Washington University From 2009 2013 Dr Merrigan was U S Deputy Secretary and Chief Operating Officer of the U S Department of Agriculture where she created and led the Know Your Farmer Know Your Food Initiative to support local food systems She previously worked as senior staff to the U S Senate Committee on Agriculture Nutrition and Forestry where she wrote the law establishing national standards for organic food Mike Laughlin certified organic specialty crop farmer Northridge Organic Farm in Johnstown Ohio was one of Ohio s first certified organic farms under the federal standards Abby Youngblood National Organic Coalition Executive Director Abby previously served as the Food and Environment Program Officer at the North Star Fund co owned and operated a vegetable farm in New York and advocated for a strong organic standard in 2001 About OEFFA The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA is a statewide grassroots nonprofit organization founded in 1979 by farmers gardeners and conscientious eaters working together to create and promote a sustainable and healthful food and farming system OEFFA operates one of the oldest and largest organic certification agencies in the country and offers educational programming and support to organic farmers and businesses and those looking to transition to organic For more information go to www oeffa org What s in a Label You May Not Know with DARK Act October 21 2015 Farm Policy OEFFA in the News Lauren Ohio Public News Service By Mary Kuhlman 9 16 15 COLUMBUS Ohio With preservatives flavorings and other unpronounceable ingredients making sense of food labels is difficult enough Opponents say the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act could create even more confusion They refer to it as the Deny Americans the Right to Know or DARK Act The legislation would allow foods made with genetically modified organisms to be labeled as natural and allow some GMO foods to be labeled as non GMO Warren Taylor who produces non GMO milk at Snowville Creamery in central Ohio said the act would take away people s right to know what they re eating The cheapest commodity jug milk at a grocery store can be now labeled non GMO milk he said Every egg sold in America can be labeled non GMO eggs regardless of the fact that those animals are all being fed GMO feed The bill also would ban states from regulating food labeling which supporters say would stop a patchwork of conflicting laws While it would set up a voluntary national labeling system Taylor argued that most companies that actually use GMO foods are not going to advertise it The legislation passed in the U S House with only two Ohio lawmakers voting against it The Senate could introduce the measure soon Taylor contended that the bill undermines existing businesses like his that sell non GMO products For the past eight years he said Snowville Creamery has been breaking even and recently received a game changing offer that would have paid the company a premium for its non GMO milk but the deal didn t last because of the labeling act The day the DARK Act passed the House of Representatives a week later they called me from the cheese plant and rescinded their offer because all cheese in America became non GMO according to the DARK Act if it passes the Senate this month he said Snowville Creamery is like a cat hanging on a wall right now There are global economic concerns Taylor said At least 35 countries have laws that impose labeling or import restrictions on GMO foods Taylor said America s non GMO producers will suffer without proper labeling The purpose of the DARK Act is to not give the American people the GMO labeling that every other industrialized democracy and Russia and China have he said but rather to assure that the American people will never be able to make an informed choice A poll this year found that 87 percent of Ohioans surveyed support the labeling of genetically engineered foods Details of the legislation HR 1599 are online at congress gov The poll is at policy oeffa org New Study Highlights Opportunities for Organic Agriculture September 18 2015 OEFFA Press Releases Lauren For Immediate Release September 18 2015 Contact Amalie Lipstreu Policy Program Coordinator 614 421 2022 Ext 208 amalie oeffa org Lauren Ketcham Communications Coordinator 614 421 2022 Ext 203 lauren oeffa org Columbus OH A government survey of U S organic farms shows Ohio s growth in organic sales follow the national trend and while the number of organic farms in Ohio fell slightly over the past five years Ohio farmland in organic production has increased by more than 10 000 acres since 2008 The United States Department of Agriculture s National Agriculture Statistics Service USDA NASS released results from the 2014 Organic Production Survey this week revealing a 72 percent increase in organic sales since 2008 as well as a slight decrease in the number of organic farmers and total organic acreage in the U S While the decrease in the number of organic farms nationally and in Ohio is a concern Ohio remains in the top 10 of states in the number of organic farms in operation said Amalie Lipstreu Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA Policy Program Coordinator More than 40 percent of Ohio organic farmers earn between 75 and 100 percent of their income from organic farming The data show that organic farming provides a full time occupation for many farmers and there is a future in organic production as demand outpaces supply for organic food in the U S said Lipstreu These results also show a strong commitment to the organic market as more than 40 percent of Ohio s organic farmers plan to increase organic production In 2015 OEFFA has also seen an increase in the number of farmers seeking certification for the first time While 78 percent of organic sales are to wholesale markets the first point of sale for 80 percent of all U S organic products was less than 500 miles from the farm The growth of local and regional food systems as well as access to large wholesale markets provide huge growth opportunities for organic farmers said Lipstreu This study represents the second comprehensive survey of organic agriculture in the U S The ability to have trend data and analysis of organic agriculture in Ohio and the U S provides information critical to the organic industry and the farming community said Lipstreu Continuing to collect and analyze this information will help current producers as well as those considering a transition to organic agriculture understand the growing demand price premiums and production challenges OEFFA is one of the oldest and largest organic certification agencies in the country and offers educational programming and support to organic farmers and businesses and those looking to transition to organic For more information click here The complete report can be accessed at the USDA Census of Agriculture website Shagbark Seed Mill is changing the way restaurants use grains August 10 2015 OEFFA in the News Organic Certification Lauren By Beth Stallings Columbus Crave Fall 2015 Brandon Jaeger and Michelle Ajamian sit across from each other at the center of a long table they ve haphazardly strung together from four tops at Athens hippie Mexican eatery Casa Nueva One by one as their friends arrive a recent college grad in a maxi skirt a toddler wheeling couple sporting dreadlocks Jaeger and Ajamian jump up and smile with arms outstretched Every guest is treated with an enthusiastic hello or a strong armed embrace that lingers with familiarity The convivial air carries through dinner Familial teasing is directed at the father figure of the group Remember that one time Jaeger had to learn to drive a combine on the fly and then it ran out of gas on a hill Or when having never operated a forklift before he had to reverse it off the bed of a truck The goateed Jaeger laughs along as he takes it in stride adding to the stories with hand gestures that mimic gear shifting Amused Ajamian sips on a can of Jackie O s beer as she good naturedly disputes small details in every tale Among the baskets of tortilla chips and sauce covered enchiladas that decorate the table the real reason for this dinner takes shape The staples of this meal chips black beans tortillas would not be possible without this ragtag group of community do gooders who learned how to run an organic grain and seed mill on the job Since opening in 2010 Shagbark Seed Mill has become a source to which organic farmers can sell corn that turns into food not feed and from where area chefs find grains beans and flour grown and processed in Ohio Brandon Jaeger at the Shagbark mill in Athens That s a tougher feat than it may seem Until Shagbark began selling black turtle beans Northstar Cafe had to look to the West Coast to buy the essential ingredient for its veggie burger One corn farmer confesses he had never tasted his own crop in a product before Shagbark began making tortilla chips Brandon and Michelle are really in a very direct way changing the world and Ohio for the better says Darren Malhame partner at Northstar Cafe People like to talk about organic like it s some sort of elitist thing There s nothing elitist about providing healthy food for everyone They re using corn for really what it should be Sustaining the masses is exactly how the idea of the mill started At the peak of the local food movement as consumers began obsessing over heirloom tomatoes and kale grown nearby Jaeger fixated on a single question Why are we looking elsewhere for staple foods like corn and beans We re just not going to survive on tomatoes and lettuce and kale and heirloom squash We re going to need to rebuild our staples says Jaeger who calls this conundrum his existential anxiety Someone needs to be focusing on organically producing the foods that have been a staple in our diets for so long That someone it turned out is Shagbark An Origin Story Shagbark Seed Mill was never intended to be a business It was an experiment that started with a two year grant application to Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education a U S Department of Agriculture organization that promotes agricultural innovation At the time Jaeger was on a monastic training retreat at the San Francisco Zen Center Ajamian a community activist with a design background came out to stay with Jaeger planning the getaway to work on a grant proposal to support a perennial annual education lab But after Jaeger first uttered the phrase existential anxiety Ajamian suggested a second proposal The question that won them the 5 800 grant in 2008 Could they create a model staple food system that would make high nutrient grains and beans local again It started as test plots on four farms to identify which ancient grains quinoa amaranth millet and beans would grow well in Appalachia But as they conducted studies and consulted with members of the collaborative they d created Jaeger and Ajamian found one glaring piece missing from the staple food network a processing facility Even if a farmer wanted to grow black turtle beans Jaeger says he d have no outlet through which to process them We were ready for a blissful life with our hands in the soil and walking through test plots with clipboards noting pollinator activity and stem girth Jaeger says But we realized there are plenty of farmers around us with the soil and equipment and know how to grow the right crops But they need a reason for it If you wanted to open a coffee shop you could walk around a single city block find a handful of java slinging storefronts and get a feel for how the business is run But five years ago if you wanted to start a regional organic grain mill you d come up short with examples to follow That was a big challenge in the beginning as they launched their prototype regional mill Ajamian says They consulted with any experts they could find cobbling together the necessary equipment An organic farmer in Oregon recommended the kind of French mill they needed They found a seed cleaner for sale in Westerville The wooden Austrian sift box they use now to grind polenta grits spelt flour and buckwheat flour is still technically on loan from a farmer And of course they needed to persuade area farmers this would work and it would be worth working with the little guy who needed a few hundred pounds not tons of corn Thankfully the right farmer followed Ajamian out into the hallway She had just delivered her stump speech to a group of grain farmers at an Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association OEFFA meeting I d like to come down and see what you re doing said the anything but shy Chris Clinehens More than a decade earlier the third generation Bellefontaine area farmer had his conventional 210 acre farm certified organic Shagbark intrigued him That first trip he brought 150 pounds of corn Now he supplies the more than 100 000 pounds of corn needed annually to make Shagbark s signature tortilla chips and corn crackers Talk to him about his commitment to Shagbark and he speaks as if he s a partner in the business wishing his farm wasn t 250 miles away so he could help more day to day They ve got a lot of guts Clinehens says admitting he s given them a lot of leeway on when they pay for product But it s worth it he says because he believes in their mission I can see where they re headed It s pretty outstanding that they ve accomplished what they have For a company that runs on part time employees and volunteers Shagbark s growth has been explosive from selling corn meal and spelt berries at the Athens Farmers Market to tortillas and chips at Columbus area Whole Foods Clinehens is one of eight farmers a mix of certified organic and Amish who supply the mill with high nutrient organic goods to produce roughly a dozen products including buckwheat flour spelt popcorn stone ground grits and polenta and pinto and black beans Shagbark went from selling 10 000 worth of product its first year to 125 000 the next By 2013 they reached 321 000 in sales It s leveled out a bit Jaeger says but

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?author=2&paged=3 (2016-02-17)
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  • OEFFA Joins Groups to Challenge Major USDA Change to Organic Rule | OEFFA News
    materials takes place on a five year cycle with a procedure for relisting if consistent with OFPA criteria Plaintiffs in this case maintain that the USDA organic rule establishes a public process that creates public trust in the USDA organic label which has resulted in exponential growth in organic sales over the last two decades At issue in the lawsuit is a rule that implements the organic law s sunset provision which since its origins has been interpreted to require all listed materials to cycle off the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances every five years unless the NOSB votes by a two thirds majority to relist them In making its decision the NOSB is charged with considering public input new science and new information on available alternatives In September 2013 in a complete reversal of accepted process USDA announced a definitive change in the rule it had been operating under since the inception of the organic program without any public input Now materials can remain on the National List in perpetuity unless the NOSB takes initiative to vote it off the List In a joint statement the plaintiffs representing a broad cross section of interests in organic said We are filing this lawsuit today because we are deeply concerned that the organic decision making process is being undermined by USDA The complaint challenges the unilateral agency action on the sunset procedure for synthetic materials review which represents a dramatic departure from the organic community s commitment to an open and fair decision making process subject to public input Legally the agency s decision represents a rule change and therefore must be subject to public comment But equally important it is a departure from the public process that we have built as a community This process has created a

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1960 (2016-02-17)
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  • Poll Shows Bi-Partisan Support for GE Labeling in Ohio | OEFFA News
    independent poll of 520 registered Ohio voters on February 4 5 2015 Key findings include 87 of Ohio voters want GE foods labeled and 61 disapprove of GE food 70 of women the primary food purchaser in most households disapprove of GE food and 92 of the women polled want those products labeled Support for GE labeling is a non partisan issue 89 of Republicans 88 of Democrats and 85 of Independents support GE labeling According to OEFFA member and clinical nurse Lynne Genter This poll clearly illustrates that Ohioans are knowledgeable about genetically engineered foods and want to know when foods contain GE ingredients Ohioans have raised their concerns in a unified voice and our legislators should pass a GE labeling bill Despite widespread use consumers and non GE farmers have expressed serious concerns about the technology including drift of GE pollen contaminating other plants the patenting of seed and ownership of nature the increased use of synthetic chemicals that has led to herbicide resistant superweeds and other potential environmental and human health impacts These concerns are often the subject of much debate particularly given the lack of independent scientific review and oversight It s clear from this survey that Ohioans want the right to choose said Lipstreu Just as consumers can choose whether to buy juice from concentrate labeling foods produced with GE ingredients can provide them with information they are asking for in a clear and cost effective way A two page issue brief and infographic summarizing the poll results can be found at http policy oeffa org gepoll Post navigation Farm trend watcher has high hopes for Ohio farmers in the new food movement If it s Safe for the Table Put it on the Label Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1947 (2016-02-17)
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  • OEFFA Announces 2015 Stewardship and Service Awards | OEFFA News
    creating change in their local community and in the dairy industry they worked with Warren and Victoria Taylor to create Snowville Creamery in 2007 a small scale dairy processing plant located on The Brick Dairy Farm Fresh grass fed milk from Bill and Stacy s 250 cross bred dairy cows is minimally processed and packaged on site Today Snowville s milk yogurt and other products are available in more than 125 retail locations Early supporters of OEFFA Bill and Stacy have been members for more than 25 years The partnership between Bill and Stacy and Snowville Creamery is a great story that shows what s possible when farmers food processors and the community team up to support sustainable agriculture and local producers Bill and Stacy took a gamble and made their vision a reality said OEFFA Executive Director Carol Goland 2015 Service Award Winner John Sowder Franklin County Long time OEFFA member John Sowder of Columbus served on OEFFA s Board of Trustees from 1992 until 2015 including multiple terms as board treasurer John helped to grow OEFFA develop new administrative systems and provided dependability and financial guidance during lean years in the organization s history He regularly lends his catering and event management skills to OEFFA helping to organize farm to table events and OEFFA s conference meals which are locally sourced and made from scratch He can be found each year in the kitchen at the OEFFA conference where he helps to serve more than 2 000 meals to attendees He has also helped encourage his peers within Ohio s catering and food industry to serve more local food from Ohio producers John s commitment to OEFFA and central Ohio s local food movement is unquestionable Always quick to smile and laugh John has played a leading role

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1916 (2016-02-17)
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  • Ohio’s Largest Food and Farm Conference Features Three Pre-Conference Workshops: Regenerative Agriculture, Poultry, and Dairy Herd Health Sessions Will Provide In-Depth Knowledge to Farmers and Veterinarians | OEFFA News
    the past 30 years Adkins has raised more than 50 breeds and varieties of chickens ducks geese and turkeys A licensed poultry judge he established the International Center for Poultry in 1992 and has taught at field days workshops and conferences Designed for poultry producers of any scale this session will explore the unique advantages of sustainable production systems while exploring the history of traditional heritage breeds and the transition to hybrid breeds and industrial production models Growers will walk away with an understanding of the breeding feed forage facilities and care required for different size production models and how to make their poultry businesses profitable through effective financial planning marketing and consumer education During this pre conference workshop veterinarians Dr Päivi Rajala Schultz and Dr Luciana da Costa from the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine and Organic Valley staff veterinarian Dr Guy Jodarski will help dairy producers and veterinarians serving organic dairy farmers learn how practical management and mastitis control practices can improve milk quality and farm profitability Attendees will learn the basic requirements for good udder health strategies for managing clinical mastitis and more Thanks to funding from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education NCR SARE Professional Development Program a limited number of scholarships are available for veterinarians to attend the dairy herd health pre conference event at no cost To request a scholarship or to nominate a veterinarian who would benefit from this opportunity contact Eric Pawlowski at 614 421 2022 Ext 209 or eric oeffa org All pre conference workshops will be held from 10 a m 4 p m on Friday February 13 at Granville High School 248 New Burg St Granville Ohio Pre registration is required and costs 75 for OEFFA members and 90 for non members The pre conference workshops

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1872 (2016-02-17)
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  • Scientist and Biotechnology Expert Doug Gurian-Sherman to Keynote Ohio’s Largest Food and Farm Conference | OEFFA News
    the example of toxic algae pollution in Lake Erie Gurian Sherman writes for Civil Eats piecemeal fixes like no till though they have some important benefits will not fix a system that is fundamentally broken We need systematic change not band aids In another article he goes onto say by recognizing the opportunities provided by organic farming we might be able to reverse current misplaced priorities and move toward a resilient ecologically sound and highly productive approach to farming On Sunday February 15 at 9 30 a m Gurian Sherman will also lead a two hour workshop Genetically Engineered Crops What You Need to Know About Health and Contamination Risks He will present the facts about public health contamination and government regulations surrounding GE food which he recently discussed during an interview on All Sides with Ann Fisher Gurian Sherman is the Director of Sustainable Agriculture and Senior Scientist at the Center for Food Safety in Washington D C He is the founding co director and former science director for the biotechnology project at the Center for Science and the Public Interest From 2006 to 2014 he served as senior scientist in the food and environment program at the Union of Concerned Scientists Previously Gurian Sherman worked at the Environmental Protection Agency where he examined the human health impacts and environmental risks of genetically engineered plants He also worked in the biotechnology group at the U S Patent and Trademark Office and he served on the Food and Drug Administration s inaugural advisory food biotechnology subcommittee He is a respected scientist widely cited expert on biotechnology and sustainable agriculture and author of dozens of articles papers and reports including the landmark Union of Concerned Scientists report Failure to Yield Evaluating the Performance of Genetically Engineered Crops In addition to Gurian

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1846 (2016-02-17)
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  • Award-Winning Journalist to Keynote Ohio’s Largest Food and Farm Conference: Alan Guebert to Discuss Future of Farming | OEFFA News
    will explore why the future of farming will require us to focus on public policy and private muscle to ensure the tools resources and knowledge we use today and tomorrow are intelligent sustainable and profitable On Saturday February 14 at 10 35 a m Guebert will also lead a one hour workshop Should We Have an Organic Check Off Program This moderated debate will explore both sides of a proposed organic check off program Guebert an award winning freelance agricultural journalist and expert who was raised on a 720 acre dairy farm in southern Illinois began the syndicated agriculture column The Farm and Food File in 1993 It now appears weekly in more than 70 newspapers throughout the U S and Canada Throughout his career Guebert has won numerous awards and accolades for his magazine and newspaper work In 1997 the American Agricultural Editors Association honored him with its highest awards Writer of the Year and Master Writer Guebert has been described as one of America s finest writers on the workings and the politics of our food system by Eric Schlosser and a rare gift to farmers and non farmers alike since he provides down home wisdom that helps us all make sense of the important but often misunderstood food and farm issues by Fred Kirschenmann He has worked as a writer and senior editor at Professional Farmers of America and Successful Farming magazine and contributing editor at Farm Journal magazine His new book The Land of Milk and Uncle Honey Memories from the Farm of My Youth will be published by the University of Illinois Press in spring 2015 In addition to Guebert this year s conference will feature respected scientist and biotechnology expert Dr Doug Gurian Sherman as keynote speaker on Sunday February 15 nearly 100 educational workshops three in depth pre conference workshops on Friday February 13 a trade show activities for children and teens locally sourced and organic homemade meals and Saturday evening entertainment The OEFFA conference will be held at Granville High School 248 New Burg St in Granville For more information about the conference or to register go to www oeffa org conference2015 Past conferences have sold out in advance so early registration is encouraged to avoid disappointment Our Sponsors Northstar Café Chipotle Mexican Grill Jeni s Splendid Ice Creams OSU College of Food Agricultural and Environmental Sciences UNFI Granville Exempted Village Schools Greenacres Foundation Jorgensen Farms Mustard Seed Market and Café Natural Awakenings Central Ohio Cincinnati and Toledo Organic Valley Snowville Creamery Albert Lea Seed Company Eban Bakehouse Edible Cleveland Edible Ohio Valley Green BEAN Delivery Green Field Farms Lucky Cat Bakery Metro Cuisine Raisin Rack Natural Food Market Stauf s Coffee Roasters Swainway Urban Farm Whole Foods Market Advancing Eco Agriculture Andelain Fields C TEC of Licking County Casa Nueva Columbus Culinary Institute Curly Tail Organic Farm DNO Produce Eden Foods Kevin Morgan Studio King Family Farm Law Office of David G Cox Luna Burger Northridge Organic Farm Ohio Environmental Council

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1827 (2016-02-17)
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  • Last Minute Budget Makes Long-Term Mistakes: Press Statement by Amalie Lipstreu | OEFFA News
    which the 2014 Farm Bill made mandatory It is a backdoor approach to de fund agricultural programs by those putting together the budget bill When environmental regulation is opposed voluntary approaches to address environmental concerns are held up as the solution The commitment to improving agriculture and the environment is called into question when those measures are undercut The EQIP program is an important tool for farmers implementing measures to address natural resource concerns like toxic algae affecting Ohio s waterways such as Lake Erie and Grand Lake St Marys Nationally more than1 5 million acres were planted with cover crops between 2009 and 2012 as a result of the EQIP program helping to reduce nutrient runoff The demand for EQIP technical assistance and resources already exceeds the funding allocated to Ohio Further reductions in funding are a disincentive to conservation The new spending bill also includes a detrimental anti farmer provision that would create an unfair marketplace for meat and poultry producers It removes protection from retaliation when they use their first amendment rights denies them the right to a jury trial and even denies them the right to know how the prices they receive are calculated This should not be part of any legislation in a free market economy As lawmakers hurriedly craft a deal to prevent government shutdown sustainable agriculture and the rights of family farmers should not be sacrificed Post navigation Renewing Ohio s Heart and Soil Online Registration Now Open for Ohio s Largest Sustainable Food and Farm Conference Interview with Lauren Ketcham and Alan Guebert Archives Select Month February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 August 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.oeffa.org/news/?p=1810 (2016-02-17)
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