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  • OSEA: Globe and Mail - Solar legend guides startup across Valley of Death
    Power Community Power Publications Energy Policy Economics Guidebooks and Tools Renewable Energy articles publications Sustainable Energy OSEA Archives Green Energy Act Campaign Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program RESOP Search Home News Updates OSEA Member News News Updates OSEA Member News Globe and Mail Solar legend guides startup across Valley of Death How did tiny Morgan Solar lure Asif Ansari to Toronto from California to become its CEO Easy It invented

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=948&ContentID=3104&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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  • OSEA: New Office Space Available!
    News New Office Space Available OSEA is looking for organizations or individuals to share office space in our suite located at 156 Front Street West in the heart of the financial district The building is located on the north side of the street just west of University Avenue and is easily accessible by public transit and several parking facilities We have two different alcoves available approximately 200 and 150 sq ft which includes 4 desks 2 desks for the smaller alcove and a filing cabinet The rent for these spaces is 2 500 and 1 500 respectively plus HST per month and includes internet and phone fees kitchen access boardroom usage and janitorial and reception service We also have the following rental options available for individuals who require one seat or a place to work for a day or a few hours 600 plus HST per month 70 plus HST per day 10 plus HST per hour FREE for members up to two hours per day Please note boardroom usage is separate when renting space by the hour Boardroom rates are 25 per day for members and 40 per day for non members The single desks are situated in an

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=122&ContentID=2579&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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  • OSEA: Goldhawk Fights Back: Come Clean Campaign (radio interview)
    publications Sustainable Energy OSEA Archives Green Energy Act Campaign Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program RESOP Search Home News Updates OSEA Member News News Updates OSEA Member News Goldhawk Fights Back Come Clean Campaign radio interview Wednesday March 2nd 2011 11 30am AM 740 Zoomer Radio OSEA s ED Kris Stevens interviewed on the Dale Goldhawk show TOPIC Wind Turbines and the Come Clean campaign that will hold elected officials accountable

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=948&ContentID=2941&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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  • OSEA: WindSimplicity.ca - Wind Simplicity Finalist in Design for Recycling® Award
    Resource Library Community Power Community Power Publications Energy Policy Economics Guidebooks and Tools Renewable Energy articles publications Sustainable Energy OSEA Archives Green Energy Act Campaign Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program RESOP Search Home News Updates OSEA Member News News Updates OSEA Member News WindSimplicity ca Wind Simplicity Finalist in Design for Recycling Award Wind Simplicity selected as finalist in ISRI s Design for Recycling Award for its commitment to recycling

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=948&ContentID=2516&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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  • OSEA: Enfinity Canada Makes Progress at 36 MW plant, Looks to Acquire Delayed Ontario Solar Rooftop Projects
    Act Campaign Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program RESOP Search Home News Updates OSEA Member News News Updates OSEA Member News Enfinity Canada Makes Progress at 36 MW plant Looks to Acquire Delayed Ontario Solar Rooftop Projects OTTAWA ON Jan 26 2011 Enfinity a leading international solar power project developer begins the new year by announcing that construction is underway at its 36 megawatt MW Stardale installation in East Hawkesbury ON The company is also primed to announce additional projects later this month It s a good start to the year says Enfinity s managing director Chris Young But Ontario is still facing challenges when it comes to completing solar projects Young describes a scenario where global experience in financing and development can make the difference between a solar installation moving from the planning phase to actual construction He continues For many solar developers in Ontario the problem is that once they have a project permitted they often lack the technical expertise to effectively execute and this limits the ability to finance a project and can delay its progress by months if not years Enfinity s international track record is proving to be very attractive to financing institutions in Ontario we

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=122&ContentID=2891&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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  • OSEA: Paul McKay's 100th Anniversary of Ontario “Switch On” session speech
    hire private detectives to spy on those who dared criticize him In a personal tragedy worthy of Greek drama Beck s own hubris led him to disown his only daughter and send his closest friend and confidante to prison He died a forlorn lonely man The public knew none of this Knighted before his death in 1925 Sir Adam Beck s reputation as the valiant crusader for the people s power lasted decades particularly in rural Ontario where the grid transformed lives more dramatically than the Internet has changed ours Where there had once been back breaking drudgery electricity brought safe bright lights heated water for baths electric stoves and washing machines radios machinery power tools and motors to pump well water or cool dairy herd milk Fittingly one of the most popular songs of that era and a favourite of the late great Canadian novelist Robertson Davies was called Oh What a Difference Since the Hydro Came Even in courtship it seems But Beck s most enduring legacy was the elite technical corps he first assembled From 1920 to 1970 his dream prevailed as some five dozen hydro plants were built in the Trent Madawaska and Ottawa valleys across northern Ontario and near Cornwall on the St Lawrence These projects all required large amounts of capital borrowed in the public name But they paid off handsomely because hydro plants feature rugged reliable technology the fuel is free and limitless and they create no pollution Virtually all are still operating flawlessly today So for the first half century Ontario thrived on a 100 per cent green power system prices were affordable and our public utility was universally admired Because it worked That changed during the next 50 years as it built ever larger coal and nuclear plants to meet demand the utility itself was stoking To secure coal supplies Ontario Hydro bought the entire output of a mine in Pennsylvania But because mammoth plants like Nanticoke convert only 33 of the energy value into power this resulted in decades of voracious coal consumption and relentless emissions of pollutants like sulphur dioxide nitrous oxide heavy metals and greenhouse gases To secure uranium it signed the largest most expensive commercial contracts in Ontario history to buy three decades of ore from high cost low grade northern Ontario mines The contracts came into force just before it was learned that these uranium companies were members of an illegal price fixing cartel One of these uranium company presidents was also a major donor to the Conservative Party then in power and a personal friend of the Premier whose other best friend was then his top political advisor and Party bagman and Chairman of Ontario Hydro It was a cosy world where the three blithely discussed billion dollar uranium contracts during Conservative Party political conventions But these high risk coal and uranium contracts were symptoms of a deeper pathology embedded in a giant utility which was neither public nor private It had turned into a kind of 500 kilovolt Frankenstein with no master By the early 1980 s Ontario Hydro was the largest company in Canada by assets ranked among the largest electric utilities in North America directly employed 30 000 as many as all citizens of the Yukon and accounted for about half the debt obligations of the province Its official plan was to build by the year 2000 the equivalent of 150 Pickering sized nuclear and coal units This would require a capital outlay of 13 billion each year for 20 years and force it to borrow more just to make interest payments Yet this plan contained no rate increases to achieve cost recovery In short this was a business plan which would lose money on every kilowatt hour sold but somehow make up the losses in volume The implied penalty for failing to meet Hydro s break neck construction schedule or not approving unlimited public funds to pay for all this was blackouts and crippling economic impacts In just one example the Darlington nuclear plant was exempted from any independent economic and environmental assessment hearings because Hydro warned any delay would be catastrophic The initial projected cost was 3 4 billion the final price tag was 14 3 billion By contrast current Ontario environmental rules compel developers of any solar ground mount project larger than 10 kilowatts to conduct archaeological acoustic and habitat studies and convene public hearings This is like fencing in mice after letting elephants stampede But the worst legacy of this era of unaccountability still remains hidden It began with the NDP government two decades ago when the Darlington nuclear units were to come into the rate base Instead of adjusting rates to reflect the inherited 14 3 billion capital cost the Rae government buried more debt to avoid public wrath then froze power rates This folly was accelerated by Conservative premier Mike Harris who vowed zero rate increases during his entire elected term before being elected or even looking at Hydro s books Harris kept his word Four years later the utility debt was 39 billion Four years after that the costliest blackout in Ontario history hit a vulnerable grid starved of maintenance funds leaving the economy crippled for weeks This is far from ancient history Here s why When the old Ontario Hydro effectively became bankrupt in 1999 about 30 billion in stranded debt was shifted to different government ledgers Virtually all of it was due to unrecoverable nuclear costs This was originally supposed to be paid down by 2012 But since 1999 Ontario ratepayers have made 36 3 billion in cumulative payments on this stranded debt yet 27 6 billion remains to be paid Someday Somehow 27 6 billion How many in Ontario know of this debt or what it means or how it will be dealt with It is all but invisible to the public Our politicians want to keep it that way Yet the press remains lazily indifferent to this serial negligence while devoting

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=122&ContentID=2830&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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  • OSEA: Globe and Mail - Machining firm says bye autos, hello solar
    Resource Library Community Power Community Power Publications Energy Policy Economics Guidebooks and Tools Renewable Energy articles publications Sustainable Energy OSEA Archives Green Energy Act Campaign Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program RESOP Search Home News Updates OSEA Member News News Updates OSEA Member News Globe and Mail Machining firm says bye autos hello solar Samco Machinery machine shop will soon be spitting out racking components for solar panels The demand for

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=948&ContentID=2678&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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  • OSEA: Pukwis Community Wind Park
    this year the project is now moving from the feasibility stage to the construction On June 22 2010 Pukwis broke ground as heavy equipment was deployed onto Georgina Island to clear access for roads and to take core samples at site locations to evaluate and prepare for a detailed foundation design This is the first step in a construction process that will likely see the Pukwis Community Wind Park commissioned by the 4 th quarter of 2011 or early 2012 Pukwis will be built on Georgina Island which is located 1 5 kilometres off the south eastern shore of Lake Simcoe within the Greater Toronto Area Pukwis consists of 10 community scale windmills with a nameplate capacity of 2 Megawatts MW each They will be connected to the Ontario grid and produce enough electricity to power 7 500 homes and displace 15 000 tonnes of green house gas emissions annually Pukwis receives the maximum price payable for wind energy 15 cents per kWh over the 20 year life of its FIT contract with the Ontario Power Authority due to its high level of Aboriginal participation Pukwis is majority owned by the First Nation through the wholly owned Pukwis Wind Partner I Inc A local renewable energy co operative Pukwis Energy Co operative holds the remaining equity interest This unique ownership structure has been developed to ensure that the First Nations leadership role in the project continues throughout its operational phase while also allowing for meaningful participation from the broader community Structuring the ownership of Pukwis in this way means that much of the revenue from the project remains in the local area and in Ontario generally This is important as local economic development both for the First Nation and for the broader community is an important driver of the project

    Original URL path: http://ontario-sea.org/Page.asp?PageID=122&ContentID=2617&SiteNodeID=271 (2016-02-18)
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