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  • Open Logger Project : Required Tools
    Basic Multimeter r1c3 Created by kelly Last Modification Sunday 08 of February 2009 14 02 38 UTC by kelly Similar Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages Structures Articles Articles home List articles Forums List forums Directory Browse directory File Galleries List galleries Sidebar Login Login as User Password Remember me Login I forgot my password Standard Secure Support this Site Please help support

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=Required+Tools&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : How To Solder
    been cleaned you are ready to place the component on the board Bend the leads as necessary and insert the component through the proper holes on the board To hold the part in place while you are soldering you may want to bend the leads on the bottom of the board at a 45 degree angle Once you are sure that the component is properly placed you can more on to the next step 2 Apply Heat Apply a very small amount of solder to the tip of the iron This helps conduct the heat to the component and board but it is not the solder that will make up the joint Now you are ready to actually heat the component and board Lay the iron tip so that it rests against both the component lead and the board Normally it takes one or two seconds to heat the component up enough to solder but larger components and larger soldering pads on the board can increase the time 3 Apply Solder And Remove Heat Once the component lead and solder pad has heated up you are ready to apply solder Touch the tip of the strand of solder to the component lead and solder pad but not the tip of the iron If everything is hot enough the solder should flow freely around the lead and pad Once the surface of the pad is completely coated you can stop adding solder and remove the soldering iron in that order Don t move the joint for a few seconds to allow the solder to cool If you do move the joint you will get what s called a cold joint This will be discussed shortly 4 Trim Leads After soldering all of the wires or leads from a part use cutters to trim the excess wire nearly flush with the board 5 Cleanup After you have made all the solder joints you may wish to clean with steel wool or solvent to remove all the left over rosin You may also wish to coat the bottom of the board with lacquer This will prevent oxidation and keep it nice and shiny Cold Solder Joints A cold joint is a joint in which the solder does not make good contact with the component lead or printed circuit board pad Cold joints occur when the component lead or solder pad moves before the solder is completely cooled Cold joints make a really bad electrical connection and can prevent your circuit from working Cold joints can be recognized by a characteristic grainy dull gray colour and can be easily fixed This is done by first removing the old solder with a desoldering tool or simply by heating it up and flicking it off with the iron Once the old solder is off you can resolder the joint making sure to keep it still as it cools Tips and Tricks for Soldering Soldering is something that needs to be practiced These tips should help you

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=How+To+Solder&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : How to Make Printed Circuit Boards
    the board After the board has been sanded it must be cleaned to remove any traces of dirt or chemicals which may prevent the toner from sticking to the copper It is also important that the cleaner does not leave any chemical traces Chemicals like acetone nail polish remover or methylated spirits evaporate any traces of themselves and are ideal for this purpose After this the board is ready for the toner transfer In order to transfer the toner from the paper to the PCB you will need a hot clothes iron a flat surface and a container of warm water Toner has a reasonably high melting point thus it is best to set the iron temperature as high as it will go It is not uncommon for the paper to turn a light golden color during the toner transfer process When applying the iron apply it with as much pressure as possible After the iron has been applied for a few seconds the toner starts to melt and the paper sticks to the board When this happens start moving the iron around the paper to ensure that all areas are properly heated and have pressure applied to them otherwise areas under the steam holes or other uneven surfaces may not transfer properly When the ironing is finished a process which typically takes 3 6 minutes depending on board size drop the board in a container of warm water Sometimes at this point the board will actually sizzle because of the heat The board can then soak for 10 30 minutes or longer two circuit boards on the same sheet of copper soaking in water After the board has been soaked it is time to carefully peel off the paper Usually the paper will tear or won t come off properly It is only important to clear areas which will be etched any paper on the toner traces can stay removing paper after transfer process To scratch off the paper either rub it off with your thumb or use a toothbrush Toner normally adheres to the surface and will not easily scrape off so significant pressure can be applied board after toner transfer some of the traces need to be touched up with a marker At this point it is important to make absolutely certain that the traces are perfect If you are unhappy with the transferred results simply remove the toner with acetone and start again Small scratches and errors can be fixed with an etch resistant marker or Sharpie brand black permanent marker after the board has dried bits of paper can be seen covering small areas of the board after drying Areas which did transfer well and small remnants of paper over areas that should be exposed especially common over drill holes may be scratched off with a very fine artwork knife or scalpel If in doubt mark the traces with the etch resistant marker and make sure all component pads are free of paper as next

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=How+to+Make+Printed+Circuit+Boards&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : Available Sensors
    Resistance RFID Radio frequency identification RFID is an automatic identification method used in many products PIT tags are but one example each tag is encoded with a unique number The currently available scanners can only read tags that operate at 125kHz 135kHz tags can not be read yet Temperature Temperature can be measured in several ways The simplest method is to use a thermistor a resistor that restricts the flow of electricity inversely proportional to the temperature The temperature is read using a voltage divider that measures the change in voltage in reference to the maximum voltage using a second resistor of a known value Alternatively temperature can be measured using digital probe such as the One Wire Digital Temperature Sensor DS18B20 or LM35 Precision Temperature Sensor that can send the actual temperature at a greater resolution and without the need to convert an analog signal A thermocouple that can be used to measure very high and very low temperatures about 270 to 1370C Velocity Created by kelly Last Modification Sunday 22 of February 2009 03 41 13 UTC by kelly Similar Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages Structures Articles Articles home List

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=Available+Sensors&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : Components Encyclopedia
    other components from damage due to excessive current Integrated Circuit IC A miniaturized electronic circuit consisting mainly of transistors as well as passive components that has been manufactured in the surface of a thin substrate of semiconductor material Integrated circuits are used in almost all electronic equipment in use today and have revolutionized the world of electronics Microcontroller A small computer on a single integrated circuit consisting of a relatively simple CPU combined with support functions such as a crystal oscillator timers watchdog serial and analog I O etc Program memory in the form of NOR flash or OTP ROM is also often included on chip as well as a typically small read write memory Thus in contrast to the microprocessors used in personal computers and other high performance applications simplicity is emphasized Some microcontrollers may operate at clock frequencies as low as 32KHz as this is adequate for many typical applications enabling low power consumption milliwatts or microwatts They will generally have the ability to retain functionality while waiting for an event such as a button press or other interrupt power consumption while sleeping CPU clock and most peripherals off may be just nanowatts making many of them well suited for long lasting battery applications Microcontrollers are used in automatically controlled products and devices such as automobile engine control systems remote controls office machines appliances power tools and toys By reducing the size cost and power consumption compared to a design that uses a separate microprocessor memory and input output devices microcontrollers make it economical to electronically control many more processes Printed Circuit Board PCB A printed circuit board or PCB is used to mechanically support and electrically connect electronic components using conductive pathways or traces etched from copper sheets laminated onto a non conductive substrate PCBs are rugged

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=Components+Encyclopedia&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : Arduino and Freeduino
    oscillator a USB connection a power jack an ICSP header and a reset button It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC to DC adapter or battery to get started Summary Microcontroller ATmega168 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage recommended 7 12V Input Voltage limits 6 20V Digital I O Pins 14 of which 6 provide PWM output Analog Input Pins 6 DC Current per I O Pin 40 mA DC Current for 3 3V Pin 50 mA Flash Memory 16 KB of which 2 KB used by bootloader SRAM 1 KB EEPROM 512 bytes Clock Speed 16 MHz Power The Arduino can be powered via a USB connection or with an external power supply External non USB power can come either from an AC to DC adapter or battery The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2 1mm center positive plug into the board s power jack Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts If supplied with less than 7V however the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable If using more than 12V the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts Memory The ATmega168 has 16 KB of flash memory for storing code of which 2 KB is used for the bootloader It has 1 KB of SRAM and 512 bytes of EEPROM which can be read and written with the EEPROM library Input and Output Each of the 14 digital pins on the Arduino can be used as an input or output using pinMode digitalWrite and digitalRead functions They operate at 5 volts Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull up resistor disconnected by default of 20 50 kOhms In addition some pins have specialized functions Serial 0 RX and 1 TX Used to receive RX and transmit TX TTL serial data These pins are connected to the corresponding pins of the FTDI USB to TTL Serial chip External Interrupts 2 and 3 These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value a rising or falling edge or a change in value PWM 3 5 6 9 10 and 11 Provide 8 bit PWM output SPI 10 SS 11 MOSI 12 MISO 13 SCK These pins support SPI communication which although provided by the underlying hardware is not currently included in the Arduino language The Arduino has 6 analog inputs each of which provide 10 bits of resolution i e 1024 different values By default they measure from ground to 5 volts though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin Additionally some pins have specialized functionality I2C 4 SDA and

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=Arduino+and+Freeduino&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : C Programming Language
    Administrator Last Modification Tuesday 29 of December 2009 21 53 41 UTC by System Administrator Similar Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages Structures Articles Articles home List articles Forums List forums Directory Browse directory File Galleries List galleries Sidebar Login Login as User Password Remember me Login I forgot my password Standard Secure Support this Site Please help support this site Contribute your

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=C+Programming+Language&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : User Directory
    add yourself here Created by System Administrator Last Modification Sunday 03 of January 2010 00 30 30 UTC by System Administrator Similar Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages Structures Articles Articles home List articles Forums List forums Directory Browse directory File Galleries List galleries Sidebar Login Login as User Password Remember me Login I forgot my password Standard Secure Support this Site Please

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=User+Directory&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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