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  • Open Logger Project : Open Frog Logger
    a microprocessor and easily obtainable parts at a cost much less than other commercial systems The digital system presented can also record environmental variables temperature humidity pressure etc along with the audio recordings Description At the heart of the logger is an ATmega168 microcontroller a miniature computer that can process data from sensors and control other electrical devices This microcontroller was chosen because it is low cost easily available throughout the world and can run the Arduino bootloader roughly equivalent to an operating system for a microcontroller allowing the device to be programed using an USB connection without the need for a special programming device Arduino is an open source platform that already has a well developed user base and can implement programs written in the C computer language As the clock that is built into the microcontroller is not designed to keep track of time for an extended period or in a format easily read by humans an external clock capable of communicating with the microcontroller is needed This is accomplished using a DS1307 real time clock IC and watch crystal which can keep time with an accuracy to a few seconds over many months A backup battery is used so that the time is kept when the primary battery is disconnected The time and date are recorded on the audio file using a series of short and long pulses each at different frequencies corresponding to units of ones or fives or twos and tens for minutes A short high frequency pulse is used to mark the start and end of the time stamp This allows the time to be easily read by directly listening to the audio or visualizing the audio track on a computer This method is not as easy as using a talking clock but is more reliable and does not require the purchase of any additional parts The microcontroller can also be used to read environmental sensors and record the data to a SD memory card or the the audio track One thermistor used to measure air temperature is placed on the board itself and ports for up to six additional sensors are available The air temperature is recorded as pulse codes on the audio track along with the time Optionally time date and environmental data can be recorded to a text file on an SD memory card not yet implemented This would be the preferred method if multiple sensors are to be used Two adjustable power supplies are used to convert 6V to 40V from the battery to the lower voltages required by the microcontroller and audio recorder The minimum battery voltage must be greater than the voltage required for the main board and audio recorder unless the audio is powered by a separate supply with larger voltages heat sinks may be needed for the voltage regulators The power supply of the recorder can be turned on and off by the microcontroller so that a cassette recorder can be used as in the design

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=Open+Frog+Logger (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : Open Frog Logger
    both salvaged and proprietary parts by the recording medium and can not record any environmental data that may be important This project will expand the capabilities of these early analog frog loggers utilizing a microprocessor and easily obtainable parts at a cost much less than other commercial systems The digital system presented can also record environmental variables temperature humidity pressure etc along with the audio recordings Description At the heart of the logger is an ATmega168 microcontroller a miniature computer that can process data from sensors and control other electrical devices This microcontroller was chosen because it is low cost easily available throughout the world and can run the Arduino bootloader roughly equivalent to an operating system for a microcontroller allowing the device to be programed using an USB connection without the need for a special programming device Arduino is an open source platform that already has a well developed user base and can implement programs written in the C computer language As the clock that is built into the microcontroller is not designed to keep track of time for an extended period or in a format easily read by humans an external clock capable of communicating with the microcontroller is needed This is accomplished using a DS1307 real time clock IC and watch crystal which can keep time with an accuracy to a few seconds over many months A backup battery is used so that the time is kept when the primary battery is disconnected The time and date are recorded on the audio file using a series of short and long pulses each at different frequencies corresponding to units of ones or fives or twos and tens for minutes A short high frequency pulse is used to mark the start and end of the time stamp This allows the time to be easily read by directly listening to the audio or visualizing the audio track on a computer This method is not as easy as using a talking clock but is more reliable and does not require the purchase of any additional parts The microcontroller can also be used to read environmental sensors and record the data to a SD memory card or the the audio track One thermistor used to measure air temperature is placed on the board itself and ports for up to six additional sensors are available The air temperature is recorded as pulse codes on the audio track along with the time Optionally time date and environmental data can be recorded to a text file on an SD memory card not yet implemented This would be the preferred method if multiple sensors are to be used Two adjustable power supplies are used to convert 6V to 40V from the battery to the lower voltages required by the microcontroller and audio recorder The minimum battery voltage must be greater than the voltage required for the main board and audio recorder unless the audio is powered by a separate supply with larger voltages heat sinks may

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-print.php?page=Open%20Frog%20Logger (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : MiniDisc
    Go back Return to home page Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages Structures Articles Articles home List articles Forums List forums Directory Browse directory File Galleries List galleries Sidebar Login Login as User Password Remember me Login I forgot my password Standard Secure Support this Site Please help support this site Contribute your time and knowledge to develop new projects and improve existing

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-editpage.php?page=MiniDisc (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : Interfacing to Minidisc Recorders
    recording usually the record slide switch and the metal contact stop switch gently cut and remove the plastic film and metal disc over the proper button contacts button contact fully exposed Now solder small wires must fit in case when cover is replaced to the switch contacts Be sure to label the wires and if possible polarity If metal contact switches are used the small metal disc may need to be removed and the wires soldered directly to the contacts This will render the button on the case useless but can still be used by connecting the two wire leads together small amount of solder placed on both contacts of the stop button and record switch white wire is soldered to the common contact ground and red wires soldered to the stop and record contacts excess leads provide more space to work with Drill a small hole in the front case that the four wires can pass through pull the wires through and close the case Test the ability to record by first crossing the the record wires the minidisc should begin recording Now cross the stop wires the minidisc should stop recording hole drilled in case for wires to pass through wires placed through hole If everything is functioning correctly you can now re assemble the case and trim the excess wires control board screwed back in place placement of hole and wires and control board Solder a three or four pin female pin header to the wires and secure to the case using epoxy Doing this reduces strain on the wire and provides a useful port for connecting the minidisc to a microcontroller or other electronics A three or four pin female pin header cover is replaced and small area is sanded to attach control socket with epoxy

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=Interfacing+to+Minidisc+Recorders&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : NiCd
    Go back Return to home page Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages Structures Articles Articles home List articles Forums List forums Directory Browse directory File Galleries List galleries Sidebar Login Login as User Password Remember me Login I forgot my password Standard Secure Support this Site Please help support this site Contribute your time and knowledge to develop new projects and improve existing

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-editpage.php?page=NiCd (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : How to select batteries for a project
    battery capacity typically given in mA h or A h I is the current drawn from battery mA or A t is the amount of time in hours that a battery can sustain More Complex Method from OpenStream Created by System Administrator Last Modification Monday 29 of June 2009 11 28 38 UTC by System Administrator Similar Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=How+to+select+batteries+for+a+project&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : Frog Logger Program
    Vfreq 2500 Frequency of the 5 pulses time 1 2 Frequency 1 000 000 int Vdur 300 Duration of the 5 pulses int Vpause 300 pause between the 5 pulses int Ifreq 956 Frequency of 1 the pulses time 1 2 Frequency 1 000 000 int Idur 100 Duration of the 1 pulses int Ipause 300 Pause between the 1 pulses int VIpause 300 Duration between the 5 and the 1 pulses int BEfreq 500 Frequency of pulses that mark beginning and end of data transmission int Mdur 50 Duration of pulses that mark beginning and end of data transmission int Upause 600 Pause between units Additional variables not to be changed int Vhour Stores number of 5 hour pulses int Ihour Stores number of 1 hour pulses int Vminute Stores number of 10 minute pulses int Iminute Stores number of 2 minute pulses int Vday Stores number of 5 day pulses int Iday Stores number of 1 day pulses int Vmonth Stores number of 5 month pulses int Imonth Stores number of 1 month pulses int Vtherm Stores number of 5 temperature pulses int Itherm Stores number of 1 temperature pulses int Tvolt Stores value of analog thermistor pin int therm Stores current temperature int Dsecond Stores second value in decimal form int Dminute Stores minute value in decimal form int Dhour Stores hour value in decimal form int DdayOfMonth Stores day value in decimal form int Dmonth Stores month value in decimal form int StartTime Stores the time in seconds that the recorder began int CurTime Used to track the current time boolean TS false Used to play the time stamp only once while recording Convert normal decimal numbers to binary coded decimal byte decToBcd byte val return val 10 16 val 10 Convert binary coded decimal to normal decimal numbers byte bcdToDec byte val return val 16 10 val 16 1 Sets the date and time on the ds1307 2 Starts the clock 3 Sets hour mode to 24 hour clock Assumes you re passing in valid numbers void setDateDs1307 byte second 0 59 byte minute 0 59 byte hour 1 23 byte dayOfWeek 1 7 byte dayOfMonth 1 28 29 30 31 byte month 1 12 byte year 0 99 Wire beginTransmission DS1307 I2C ADDRESS Wire send 0 Wire send decToBcd second 0 to bit 7 starts the clock Wire send decToBcd minute Wire send decToBcd hour If you want 12 hour am pm you need to set Bit 6 also need to change readDateDs1307 Wire send decToBcd dayOfWeek Wire send decToBcd dayOfMonth Wire send decToBcd month Wire send decToBcd year Wire endTransmission Gets the date and time from the ds1307 void getDateDs1307 byte second byte minute byte hour byte dayOfWeek byte dayOfMonth byte month byte year Reset the register pointer Wire beginTransmission DS1307 I2C ADDRESS Wire send 0 Wire endTransmission Wire requestFrom DS1307 I2C ADDRESS 7 A few of these need masks because certain bits are control bits second bcdToDec Wire receive 0x7f minute bcdToDec

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=Frog+Logger+Program&bl=y (2016-04-24)
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  • Open Logger Project : DS1307 RTC Time Set
    2009 03 23 16 UTC by kelly Similar Sidebar Menu Home Search Wiki Wiki Home Last Changes List pages Orphan pages Structures Articles Articles home List articles Forums List forums Directory Browse directory File Galleries List galleries Sidebar Login Login as User Password Remember me Login I forgot my password Standard Secure Support this Site Please help support this site Contribute your time and knowledge to develop new projects and

    Original URL path: http://www.openlogger.org/tikiwiki-2.2/tiki-index.php?page=DS1307+RTC+Time+Set&bl=y (2016-04-24)
    Open archived version from archive