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  • OASIS
    scholarly research much of which is publicly funded Making the research publicly available to everyone free of charge and without most copyright and licensing restrictions will accelerate scientific research efforts and allow authors to reach a larger number of readers The reasons to remove restrictions as far as possible are to share knowledge and accelerate research Knowledge has always been a public good in a theoretical sense Open Access makes it a public good in practice said professor Peter Suber director of the Open Access Project at Harvard University and a senior researcher at SPARC The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition The Open Access recommendations include the development of Open Access policies in institutions of higher education and in funding agencies the open licensing of scholarly works the development of infrastructure such as Open Access repositories and creating standards of professional conduct for Open Access publishing The recommendations also establish a new goal of achieving Open Access as the default method for distributing new peer reviewed research in every field and in every country within ten years time Science and scholarship are activities funded from the public purse because society believes they will lead to a better future in terms of our health environment and culture said Heather Joseph executive director of SPARC Anything that maximises the efficacy and efficiency of research benefits every one of us Open Access is a major tool in that quest These new recommendations will underpin future developments in communicating the results of research over the next decade Today Open Access is increasingly recognized as a right rather than an abstract ideal The case for rapid implementation of Open Access continues to grow Open Access benefits research and researchers increases the return to taxpayers on their investment in research and amplifies the social value

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/ (2016-02-01)
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  • About
    Sign In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community About General Goals and Objectives Who we are Partner Organizations Acknowledgements JavaScript is disabled To display this content you need a JavaScript capable browser Adobe Flash Player not installed or older than 9 0 115 Last Updated on Monday 10 August 2009 21 03 Open Access Scholarly Information

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=184&Itemid=94 (2016-02-01)
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  • Sitemap
    Access journal Publish your book in Open Access Author s Concerns Author s Rights and Author Addenda Publisher Permissions and Embargoes Researchers and Open Access Policies Librarians OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web site and Open Access Author s concerns and Open Access General Open Access information The institutional repository web page Library organizations that support Open Access Publishers The benefits of Open Access publishing Publishing copyright and Open Access Publisher permission services Institutions and copyright Publisher policies on self archiving Open Access Journals Open Access Journals business models Case study Medknow Publications Tools and platforms Converting to Open Access Open Access Monographs Open Acess monographs business issues Case studies Open Access monographs Scholarly societies and Open Access publishing University presses and Open Access publishing Case studies university presses Open Access publishing in the humanities Open Access publishing in the social sciences Funder policies

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_xmap&Itemid=306 (2016-02-01)
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  • Search
    Publishers Administrators Public Students Sign In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community Search Search Keyword Search All words Any words Exact Phrase Ordering Newest First Oldest First Most Popular Alphabetical Section Category Search Only Articles Web Links Contacts Categories Sections News Feeds Search Keyword Total 0 results found Open Access Scholarly Information Sourcebook by Alma Swan

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_search&view=search&Itemid=367 (2016-02-01)
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  • Benefits of Open Access for research dissemination
    this meant that only researchers in institutions that could afford to pay the subscription charges were able to read journal articles Even wealthy universities could only afford a proportion of the world s research literature For institutions in poorer countries this proportion is tiny or even non existent At the beginning of this millennium more than half the research based institutions in the poorest countries had no current journal subscriptions and over 20 had an average of two subscriptions Now in the age of the World Wide Web it is possible for research findings to be disseminated free of charge to anyone who wishes to read them Those with access to the journals in their libraries will access the articles as before though some people say that it is actually quicker and easier to access Open Access copies through a search engine one or two clicks than to access the published article in a journal through their library website which normally takes several steps Those who do not have the journals they want in their library can use Google or other Web search engines to track down the Open Access literature in institutional and subject repositories Repositories can provide usage data to show the number of times articles have been downloaded The levels of this type of usage can be surprising For example in New Zealand the University of Otago s Business School set up an Open Access repository in November 2005 by February 2006 with just 220 articles in it at the time it had received almost 20 000 hits downloads Stanger and McGregor 2006 No doubt many of these are translating into citations over time Developing country repositories also enjoy a high level of usage of repositories which are at last providing to the rest of the world

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=146&Itemid=253 (2016-02-01)
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  • Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access
    In most academic libraries costly Science Technology and Medicine STM journals are consuming an ever increasing share of library budgets This is having a negative impact on other acquisitions such as research monographs textbooks and journal titles in other fields Meanwhile it has been estimated that the world production of scholarly outputs has doubled since the mid 1980s increasing the pressure on libraries to acquire more In response to the rapidly rising prices of academic journals research libraries have turned to site licensing as a means to increase their buying power and secure greater access to journals for their users These licensing agreements usually negotiated by libraries as a group library consortia have greatly enhanced access to scholarly publications in the last several years and provided some relief from the serials pricing crisis However despite the obvious benefits there is concern that site licensing will further increase the market power of the large academic publishers Licensing takes away some of the flexibility libraries have because the journals are bundled together and purchased as groups in such a way that individual journal subscriptions can no longer be cancelled Over time librarians are losing the ability to shape the content and quality of the journal literature at their institution They face an all or nothing choice of paying whatever publishers want or giving up an indispensable resource for their patrons and the largest publishers retain tremendous market power This system is simply not sustainable Even the most well endowed research library cannot afford to provide access to all of the content requested by its faculty and students The situation is even more critical for smaller college and universities and institutions in the developing world which already have limited budgets In 2003 the Director General of UNESCO Mr Koïchiro Matsuura stated that Most developing countries have so far been unable to take full advantage of the advances offered by new information and communication technologies in terms of access to scientific and technological information and learning opportunities Open Access offers a viable solution to the serials pricing crisis Widespread open access will ensure that libraries can provide access to all journal publications needed by their constituents As well libraries will be able to cancel the financial support they provide to journals through institutional memberships and other methods without the risk of losing access to essential publications Libraries and open access Not surprisingly librarians have been amongst the most vocal advocates for open access Librarians have shown their support for open access by signing on to open access initiatives and petitions They have also been actively involved through their institutions or associations in support of OA in other ways educating faculty and administrators on campus building digital repositories to support self archiving and supporting open access journals SEE ALSO Open Access and the mission of a research library What can librarians do to support and implement Open Access Further information ACRL Journal Economics Scholarly Communication Toolkit http www acrl ala org scholcomm node 9 Houghton

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=254&Itemid=256 (2016-02-01)
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  • Overview of Open Access Publishing
    journal budgets through their journal bundle deals so called Big Deals and with most Big Deals tying libraries into multi year contracts there will be less and less money left for publishers that have small lists or publish only one title and who cannot offer such deals Of course most scholarly society publishers fall into this category Some kind of Open Access model therefore has considerable appeal to journal publishers who fear that the fallout from the global recession will destroy their businesses One worry that arises if the publisher decides to adopt a business model where an APC is charged is whether authors will have access to the funds to pay the charge In some disciplines this is a real concern In the arts and humanities large research grants are much more rare than they are in the natural sciences and where an author is not in possession of a research grant the only other source of funding for APCs is the author s institution Nonetheless Open Access publishing is becoming established in the humanities and the social sciences as suitable business models are worked out As yet only a few institutions have made a commitment to pay APCs but there is considerable interest from both institutions and funders in viewing this issue sympathetically This is discussed in more detail in the sections on funder policies on Open Access publishing and i nstitutions and Open Access publishing Open Access monographs and textbooks Some publishers are experimenting with Open Access for book publishing The most common model is for the online version of the book to be made Open Access while the hard copy bound version is sold through bookstores either online book retailers such as Amazon or in shops on the street Although it might be feared to endanger hard copy sales this process appears often to have the opposite effect boosting sales of the hard copy volume The availability of the free online version provides potential readers with an insight into what the book contains in a manner analogous to Amazon s Search inside this book service Most people who see that the book is of interest will then order a printed copy Not many people find printing out a whole book on their computer s printer a satisfactory alternative to having the hard copy Open Access monograph publishing is a natural development for university press publishers whose mission should be aligned with that of the university itself in seeking to maximise the dissemination of research Some extensive explorations of new publishing models are being undertaken by university presses The benefits of Open Access to publishers Open Access benefits publishers in the same ways as it benefits authors and institutions It brings increased readership and with that increased citations It means that Google and Google Scholar index a journal s articles providing a worldwide academic and wider public audience It means that the maximum visibility and impact are achieved for a journal s contents And it means that

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=358&Itemid=263 (2016-02-01)
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  • Institutional Advantages from Open Access
    In total Southampton offers over 50000 articles to the world through these repositories Southampton University ranks in the top group of research intensive universities in the UK and comes in at position 17 in the Times Higher Education Supplement s QS Top Universities ranking for 2008 Southampton also came in equal 99th place in the world in 2008 according to this ranking which has a multifactorial basis academic peer review employer review student faculty ratio international staff international students There are other university rankings though with other bases The G Factor world ranking lists universities according to the links to their websites from the websites of other universities a form of peer ranking of a university s online presence In this ranking the top of the list is dominated by the big US universities that would be expected to top such a ranking MIT Harvard Berkeley Stanford and so on Cambridge and Oxford universities coloured pink in the chart below and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich make an appearance too but the only other European university in the top 25 places is Southampton see chart below The reason for Southampton s outstanding performance is its very strong online presence due to its huge repository content Tens of thousands of links from other universities point to articles in the repository giving Southampton s research an extremely high international profile Other universities can raise their global impact in the same way by establishing repositories full of current research outputs Usage The repository at the School of Electronics Computer Science at the University of Southampton was one of the earliest examples of the implementation of Open Access in an institutional setting It was also the earliest example of a mandatory policy one that required researchers in the School to deposit

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=142&Itemid=264 (2016-02-01)
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