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  • Access to research and the impact on real people
    of articles in medical journals and research his condition Had I not been a student I would not have had access to 90 percent of the articles says Sommer It s ludicrous that someone who is not at a university is at such a disadvantage It s wrong He brought this information to his doctor to discuss and determine the best method of treatment Sommer also contacted leading scientists studying the disease and helped link their labs spawning new research projects Today Sommers works at Duke conducting research on the causes of chordoma and feels empowered to fight the disease The NIH policy allows patients to find vital information online for free to help them understand their condition and advocate for the best healthcare Heather Joseph When Heather Joseph s five year old son was diagnosed with autoimmune insulin dependent Type 1 Diabetes she did what many worried parents should do She got online and looked for every piece of current information she could find on the condition Joseph first signed on at 3 a m after returning from a trip to the hospital with her son I was desperate for information that could reassure me that there was something else I could do besides wake my child up twice a night to check his blood sugar for signs of hypoglycemia she says Joseph discovered a 2008 study of continuous glucose monitors rating parent and patient satisfaction in the prevention of nighttime instances of low blood sugar She found the information in the researcher s final manuscript posted just one month before available solely because of the NIH Public Access Policy Mark Drapkin Access to this information has a day to day practical effect in helping physicians treat patients and save lives Recently Dr Mark S Drapkin of Newton Mass

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=548&Itemid=370 (2016-02-01)
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  • What can students do?
    than 3 000 peer reviewed open access journals currently in publication Find and use the open access journals and archives in your field SHARE YOUR WORK Writing an article for a journal Working on your thesis or dissertation Are you the editor of a student journal Gain more exposure for your work and ideas learn how to make your work open access TAKE ACTION Take action for Open Access on your campus Learn how to write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper organize an event on campus pass a resolution in your student government or ask your student organization to support Open Access SHOW YOUR SUPPORT Tell the world you want Open Access to research Click here for information about buttons stickers adding us on your favorite social networking site and other ways to show your support GET IN THE LOOP Join the SPARC email discussion network to share views with other students and get all the news you need on Open Access from SPARC For more information visit http www arl org sparc Adapted from SPARC 2008 The Right to Research The student guide to opening access to research Retrieved September 25 2009 http www arl

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=609&Itemid=408 (2016-02-01)
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  • Journals, the Cost of Education, and the Value We (Don't) Get for Our Money
    Amherst Bucknell Davidson Middlebury Reed Rhodes Trinity and 73 others is 1 302 498 That means on average a student at one of the Oberlin Group schools will pay 590 per year or 2 360 over the course of a four year college career If you go to a large research institution that number is likely much higher the average journal budget for the 123 research libraries that compose the Association of Research Libraries is 7 379 928 1 with many spending far in excess of 10 000 000 per year While these expenditures are necessary to provide students with information crucial to their education their growth over the past decade as a proportion of library spending and as a component of the overall cost of education has resulted in less rather than greater access This decline in access has occurred because library budgets cannot keep pace with skyrocketing journal prices Though we are paying more than ever we receive access to less and less material As journal prices continue to rise rapidly and library budgets shrink or at best in this weak economy stay the same the inevitable result will be a lack of access for students Given our

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=608&Itemid=409 (2016-02-01)
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  • Students' Declining Access to Research
    academic libraries The University of Washington at Pullman noted this in its recent Libraries Journal Cancellation Project 2009 Once again we have completed the difficult but necessary task of trimming our journal subscriptions in anticipation of a steep increase in costs The task grows more difficult each year since we are now losing access to core periodicals in some disciplines During this time the library materials budget has been flat we have not received increases to cover inflation in books or journals Journal inflation including access to abstracting and indexing services is running between 5 and 10 annually We now have this year s budget figures and again there is no money to keep offering the access we currently have We are going to have to cancel somewhere around 600 000 of journals approximately 15 of our remaining subscriptions This trend shows no sign of abating According to Library Journal prices of subscription based journals increased nine to ten percent in 2008 exacerbated by an extremely weak dollar Given the continuing slide of the dollar increases in 2009 are expected to approach ten percent overall 2009 data already shows that the extremely weak and volatile U S economy will result in cuts to many library budgets As a direct result many journals will be cut because libraries simply can t afford to pay for them As the University of Georgia Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost noted on September 18 2008 in a letter to faculty staff and students Because of the downturn in the state s economy the UGA University Libraries like all campus units are facing a projected 6 budget reduction This reduction in the Libraries budget coupled with the rising cost of scholarly journals likely will result in the Libraries discontinuing some journal subscriptions In

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=607&Itemid=410 (2016-02-01)
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  • High journal prices and journal sustainability
    Methods in enzymology 8 844 International journal for numerical methods in engineering 8 073 Journal of geophysical research 7 902 Experimental brain research 7 712 Biopolymers 7 665 Oncogene 7 587 Journal of chemical physics 6 163 Biotechnology bioengineering CAN OPEN ACCESS JOURNALS SURVIVE WITHOUT SUBSCRIPTION INCOME Yes While open access journals don t rely on subscription income they do need revenue to operate The 3 000 peer reviewed journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals http www doaj org thrive on a variety of different revenue models including endowment sponsorship advertising author publication fees donations membership university or department sponsorship and others WHY DO SUBSCRIPTIONS COST SO MUCH The authors of journal articles including researchers like your professors and many graduate students aren t paid by publishers for the articles they write They contribute their papers for free and sometimes pay to advance the state of scholarship in their fields and to make a name for themselves as scholars and scientists What s more these scholars also freely contribute their time to review and often edit other articles before they re published While some journals particularly those published by scholarly societies and other non profit entities charge

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=606&Itemid=411 (2016-02-01)
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  • Benefits of Open Access for research dissemination
    have been sold on subscription to libraries In the age of print on paper this was the only model available that enabled publishers to disseminate journals and recoup the cost Unfortunately this meant that only researchers in institutions that could afford to pay the subscription charges were able to read journal articles Even wealthy universities could only afford a proportion of the world s research literature For institutions in poorer countries this proportion is tiny or even non existent At the beginning of this millennium more than half the research based institutions in the poorest countries had no current journal subscriptions and over 20 had an average of two subscriptions Now in the age of the World Wide Web it is possible for research findings to be disseminated free of charge to anyone who wishes to read them Those with access to the journals in their libraries will access the articles as before though some people say that it is actually quicker and easier to access Open Access copies through a search engine one or two clicks than to access the published article in a journal through their library website which normally takes several steps Those who do not have the journals they want in their library can use Google or other Web search engines to track down the Open Access literature in institutional and subject repositories Repositories can provide usage data to show the number of times articles have been downloaded The levels of this type of usage can be surprising For example in New Zealand the University of Otago s Business School set up an Open Access repository in November 2005 by February 2006 with just 220 articles in it at the time it had received almost 20 000 hits downloads Stanger and McGregor 2006 No doubt many

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=78%3Aarticles&id=146%3Abenefitsofoa&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=253 (2016-02-01)
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  • Researchers
    from the community RSS feed Articles Topics Open Access what is it and why should we have it Benefits of Open Access for research dissemination Citation impact Managing your research profile Research metrics Researchers in Developing Countries Ways to provide Open Access to your work Open Access Repositories Self Archiving FAQs Open Access Journals Setting up an Open Access journal Publish your book in Open Access Author s Concerns Author

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=33&Itemid=253 (2016-02-01)
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  • Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access
    the pressure on libraries to acquire more In response to the rapidly rising prices of academic journals research libraries have turned to site licensing as a means to increase their buying power and secure greater access to journals for their users These licensing agreements usually negotiated by libraries as a group library consortia have greatly enhanced access to scholarly publications in the last several years and provided some relief from the serials pricing crisis However despite the obvious benefits there is concern that site licensing will further increase the market power of the large academic publishers Licensing takes away some of the flexibility libraries have because the journals are bundled together and purchased as groups in such a way that individual journal subscriptions can no longer be cancelled Over time librarians are losing the ability to shape the content and quality of the journal literature at their institution They face an all or nothing choice of paying whatever publishers want or giving up an indispensable resource for their patrons and the largest publishers retain tremendous market power This system is simply not sustainable Even the most well endowed research library cannot afford to provide access to all of the content requested by its faculty and students The situation is even more critical for smaller college and universities and institutions in the developing world which already have limited budgets In 2003 the Director General of UNESCO Mr Koïchiro Matsuura stated that Most developing countries have so far been unable to take full advantage of the advances offered by new information and communication technologies in terms of access to scientific and technological information and learning opportunities Open Access offers a viable solution to the serials pricing crisis Widespread open access will ensure that libraries can provide access to all journal publications needed

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=79%3Aarticles&id=254%3Awhy-librarians-should-be-concered-with-open-access&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=256 (2016-02-01)
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