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  • Librarians
    OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web site and Open Access Author s concerns and

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=34&Itemid=354 (2016-02-01)
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  • Uses of a Repository
    the institution off in the best light and provides an easy route to the institution s research production Two examples of initiatives to showcase the institution or its departments or individual researchers using the repository are here Preservation A repository provides the means properly to preserve the products of the institution s research programme If preservation is an explicit goal of the institution then specific procedures need to be developed to ensure that there is a long term view of repository operations including ensuring that there is secure support for the long term from the institution Measures must be taken to ensure a secure back up process see the LOCKSS initiative for example Undoubtedly preservation of research outputs is an aim that resonates with researchers repeated surveys and studies have shown that long term access to the literature and long term care for their own outputs are issues about which researchers are concerned Considerable research and development work is going on in the area of preservation including on information lifecycle work and on preservation metadata Research monitoring and assessment In their repositories institutions have the means to monitor and manage their research programmes If all the research outputs are collected in the repository analyses can be carried out to see the outputs of departments research groups or individuals to monitor trends over time and through citation tracking to understand better the patterns and impact of research going on in the institution Prediction of future activity and directions can also be attempted The repository also provides the locus for producing the data required by the national assessment exercises that take place in some countries See institutional repositories for research management and assessment Monitoring research output by funders Research funders are becoming increasingly interested in monitoring what is produced as a result

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=79%3Aarticles&id=163%3Auses-of-a-repository&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=356 (2016-02-01)
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  • Librarians
    OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web site and Open Access Author s concerns and

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=34&Itemid=356 (2016-02-01)
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  • Business Models, Costs and ROI
    large The physics arXiv is the best known example Institutions may create their own repository or outsource this step to a commercial supplier A similar situation pertains to hosting the repository Institutions usually provide their own server space but a number opt to have their repository hosted by a third party this provides some peace of mind guarantees about back ups and long term security which an institution may feel is worth paying for The benefits of a repository Opens up the outputs of the university to the world Maximises the visibility and impact of these outputs as a result Showcases the university to interested constituencies prospective staff prospective students and other stakeholders Collects and curates digital outputs Manages and measures research and teaching activities Provides a workspace for work in progress and for collaborative or large scale projects Enables and encourages interdisciplinary approaches to research Facilitates the development and sharing of digital teaching materials and aids Supports student endeavours providing access to theses and dissertations and a location for the development of e portfolios Sustainability of the repository A repository is sustainable if it contributes effectively to the university management s agenda in terms of aiding research management maximising citation impact and improving the visibility internationally of the institution Senior management s support is crucial for the financial and political sustainability of a repository as staffing needs are minimised by the adoption of a clear institutional policy The better the policy in the first place designed to fully involve research staff in depositing their own work self archiving the less staff time needs to be allocated to gathering content for the repository on an ongoing basis Repositories in institutions with a formal mandatory policy on depositing research outputs can be run with a minimum of staff time and they collect content very effectively Those with weak or no policies require staff continually to advocate their existence and purpose and they collect only a minor proportion of a university s outputs Repository services Engagement of researchers can further be encouraged by repository services that offer useful tools for their work or the means to help them take an active management role in disseminating their outputs Some universities are developing services using their repository both for internal purposes and for external users Examples of services for use by the university and its researchers include Using the repository as a management tool for the Research Assessment Exercise Measuring the usage and impact of the research output of the university Promoting the university s research activities A marketing tool for the university Generating CVs and personal reference lists Services for external users include Publishing electronic journals As a basis for or linked with the university press to publish research monographs Making doctoral theses available to the world There is further discussion of repository services here Repository software The most commonly used softwares are EPrints developed by the University of Southampton DSpace developed at MIT FEDORA developed by Cornell University and the University of

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=79%3Aarticles&id=166%3Abusiness-models-cost-and-roi&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=357 (2016-02-01)
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  • Librarians
    Topics OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web site and Open Access Author s concerns

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=34&Itemid=357 (2016-02-01)
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  • Repository Services
    authors were they contacted them and used an opt out strategy Authors were told that their articles would be added to the repository unless they chose to opt out CERN harvests material from a range of approximately 90 external resources to further obtain complete coverage of its recent and current academic output thus contending with researchers who deposit elsewhere and not into CERN s own institutional repository Discovery Services Search and browse If users need to find content through a number of options this enables them to find what they want more easily These services can include full text and metadata searching as well as multiple browsing functionality such as by date author community and eventually by subject funding agency or document types Customising the way content can be explored makes it more usable to a wider variety of users Alert services and RSS feeds Searching for new materials requires a lot of time and has to be done regularly Repositories can make things easier for users by enabling them to set up automatic alerts or RSS feeds when new material matching their profile is added to the repository Indexibility Most users do not access the content in the repository through the repository search service but rather via an external search engine such as Google that has crawled the repository Repositories should make their content easy for search engines to index For example John Mark Ockerbloom explains in a recent blog entry d on t hide things behind Flash or Javascript unless you don t want them easily found Make sure your pages have informative titles and the site doesn t require excessive link clicking to get to content The SHERPA project lists a number of things repository managers should avoid so that content can be indexed Metadata export The OAI Protocol for Metadata Harvesting OAI PMH allows repository metadata records to be aggregated through OAI harvesting services Repositories that wish be harvested by these types of services an example of such a service is OAIster at the University of Michigan must ensure they are OAI PMH compliant and must be registered with the harvesting service Cross repository services There are a growing number of cross repository services available that aim to improve the visibility of repository content Many of these are national services such as CASSIR a cross repository service in India or NARCIS which harvests the content of Dutch repositories The Intute Repository Search project in the UK is creating a platform that will pull together UK repository content The project is developing a system that will allow advanced search and innovative access to the information such as personalised alerts or repurposed content streams into other websites Access Services Embargo management Content submitted to a repository may be restricted by laws policies or contractual obligations that require the author to limit public access for a period of time The Immediate Deposit Optional Access ID OA Mandate recommends that the author s final peer reviewed draft of all journal

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=79%3Aarticles&id=167%3Arepository-services&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=358 (2016-02-01)
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  • Librarians
    the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web site and Open Access Author s concerns and Open

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=34&Itemid=358 (2016-02-01)
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  • Paying Open Access Publishing Fees
    2008 to pay for article processing fees in Open Access journals The fund is open to all faculty staff graduate students and postdoctoral researchers at the University of Calgary and will support article processing fees of any amount However before applying for funding through this programme authors must have exhausted all other options for paying Open Access fees such as using a portion of their research grant The fund will pay the Open Access fees of peer reviewed journals that meet the following eligibility criteria a Journals which are fully Open Access That is all of the content of the entire journal is freely available online immediately after peer review and editing upon payment of the article processing fee Examples of publishers with suites of fully Open Access journals that charge article processing fees include BioMed Central BMC Co Action Publishing Hindawi Publishing Corporation PhysMath Central PMC and Public Library of Science PLoS Fully Open Access journals from publishers who have few such journals are also eligible For example Oxford University Press has Nucleic Acids Research DNA Research and Evidence based Complementary and Alternative Medicine b Journals which are not fully Open Access but which allow individual articles to be made freely available online immediately upon payment of the submission fee These are known as hybrid Open Access journals To be eligible for funding in this category the publisher must plan to make in the next subscription year reductions to the institutional subscription prices based on the number of Open Access articles in those journals To date the only publishers that have done this are Oxford University Press which has reduced subscription fees for the hybrid journals in its Oxford Open program and the American Institute of Physics which has done the same for its Author Select program Other publishers

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=265&catid=79&Itemid=326 (2016-02-01)
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