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  • Funder policies on Open Access Publishing
    individual authors whose work it supports by grants The Wellcome Trust is also unusual in that it will pay publishers to deposit articles covered by Wellcome s Open Access policy into PubMed Central on the author s behalf Other funders pay money relating to APCs directly to the author while still others prmit the author discretionary use of existing grant funds for this purpose And some funders do none of these preferring to focus on the self archiving route to open Access and avoiding involvement with formal publishing processes altogether Gratis or libre Open Access Mostly funders are not yet specific about the type of Open Access that the publisher must guarantee but some have paid more attention to this issue The Wellcome Trust has been the most thorough and specific on this point Its policy insists on publishers permitting a more liberal or libre Open Access to articles rather than simple free online access gratis OA Libre OA means that at least some permission barriers are removed as well as the price barrier that is removed by gratis OA In the best cases all permisison barriers are removed so that articles can be unrestrictedly re used as well as freely accessed This is important because new technologies data mining and text mining tools are critical for research progress in the future These tools can extract facts and data from article texts and graphics and put them together with data from other texts and graphics to make new knowledge The conditions of use of gratis OA do not necessarily enable the use of these tools libre OA conditions do and they also permit other types of re use of the work amongst them the freeing up of copying restrictions so that teachers can make full use of copies in their

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=80%3Aarticles&id=559%3Afunder-policies-on-open-access-publishing&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=389 (2016-02-01)
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  • Institutional Advantages from Open Access
    has been peer reviewed and is ready for publication in a journal In total Southampton offers over 50000 articles to the world through these repositories Southampton University ranks in the top group of research intensive universities in the UK and comes in at position 17 in the Times Higher Education Supplement s QS Top Universities ranking for 2008 Southampton also came in equal 99th place in the world in 2008 according to this ranking which has a multifactorial basis academic peer review employer review student faculty ratio international staff international students There are other university rankings though with other bases The G Factor world ranking lists universities according to the links to their websites from the websites of other universities a form of peer ranking of a university s online presence In this ranking the top of the list is dominated by the big US universities that would be expected to top such a ranking MIT Harvard Berkeley Stanford and so on Cambridge and Oxford universities coloured pink in the chart below and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich make an appearance too but the only other European university in the top 25 places is Southampton see chart below The reason for Southampton s outstanding performance is its very strong online presence due to its huge repository content Tens of thousands of links from other universities point to articles in the repository giving Southampton s research an extremely high international profile Other universities can raise their global impact in the same way by establishing repositories full of current research outputs Usage The repository at the School of Electronics Computer Science at the University of Southampton was one of the earliest examples of the implementation of Open Access in an institutional setting It was also the earliest example of

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=81%3Aarticles&id=142%3Ainstitutionaladvantages&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=337 (2016-02-01)
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  • Institutional Managers & Policy Makers
    Sign In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community RSS feed Institutional Managers Policy Makers Articles Topics Institutional Advantages for Open Access Open Access Repositories Business Aspects of Institutional Repositories Institutional Repositories for Research Management and Assessment Institutional Policies Developing an Institutional Open Access Policy The Optimal Open Access Policy for Institutions Researchers and Open Access Policies

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=36&Itemid=337 (2016-02-01)
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  • Researchers
    Students Sign In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community RSS feed Researchers Articles Topics Institutional Advantages for Open Access Open Access Repositories Business Aspects of Institutional Repositories Institutional Repositories for Research Management and Assessment Institutional Policies Developing an Institutional Open Access Policy The Optimal Open Access Policy for Institutions Researchers and Open Access Policies Open Access

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=33&Itemid=333 (2016-02-01)
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  • Business Aspects of Institutional Repositories
    more effective institutional marketing better management of intellectual assets easier assessment of research outputs the facilitation of collaborative and interdisciplinary research and the facilitation of workflow for researchers and teachers The benefits of a repository Opens up the outputs of the university to the world Maximises the visibility and impact of these outputs as a result Showcases the university to interested constituencies prospective staff prospective students and other stakeholders Collects and curates digital outputs Manages and measures research and teaching activities Provides a workspace for work in progress and for collaborative or large scale projects Enables and encourages interdisciplinary approaches to research Facilitates the development and sharing of digital teaching materials and aids Supports student endeavours providing access to theses and dissertations and a location for the development of e portfolios Sustainability of the repository A repository is sustainable if it contributes effectively to the university management s agenda in terms of aiding research management maximising citation impact and improving the visibility internationally of the institution Senior management s support is crucial for the financial and political sustainability of a repository as staffing needs are minimised by the adoption of a clear institutional policy The better the policy in the first place designed to fully involve research staff in depositing their own work a process known as self archiving the less staff time needs to be allocated to gathering content for the repository on an ongoing basis Repositories in institutions with a formal mandatory policy on depositing research outputs can be run with a minimum of staff time and they collect content very effectively Those with weak or no policies require staff continually to advocate their existence and purpose and they collect only a minor proportion of a university s outputs Repository services Engagement of researchers can further be encouraged by repository services that offer useful tools for their work or the means to help them take an active management role in disseminating their outputs Some universities are developing services using their repository both for internal purposes and for external users Examples of services for use by the university and its researchers include Using the repository as a management tool for the Research Assessment Exercise Measuring the usage and impact of the research output of the university Promoting the university s research activities A marketing tool for the university Generating CVs and personal reference lists Services for external users include Publishing electronic journals As a basis for or linked with the university press to publish research monographs Making doctoral theses available to the world Repository software The most commonly used softwares are EPrints developed by the University of Southampton DSpace developed at MIT FEDORA developed by Cornell University and the University of Virginia What does a repository cost There are examples of repositories that have cost huge sums but the average cost to establish a university repository in Europe is around 10000 euros 13000 USD Ongoing recurrent costs can also vary quite widely Set up costs The main types of

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=81%3Aarticles&id=164%3Abusiness-aspects-of-institutional-repositories&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=334 (2016-02-01)
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  • Institutional Managers & Policy Makers
    Public Students Sign In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community RSS feed Institutional Managers Policy Makers Articles Topics Institutional Advantages for Open Access Open Access Repositories Business Aspects of Institutional Repositories Institutional Repositories for Research Management and Assessment Institutional Policies Developing an Institutional Open Access Policy The Optimal Open Access Policy for Institutions Researchers and Open

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=36&Itemid=334 (2016-02-01)
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  • Institutional Repositories for Research Management and Assessment
    be metrics based and the use of institutional repositories to collect together the assessable amterial is very likely Some universities have used the 2008 UK national Research Assessment Exercise to prepare for this putting into place procedures for gathering the research output of the institution into the repository in a way that suits the requirements of the Assessment Exercise and smooths the workflow within the institution An account of how this process was tackled at the University of Southampton is here Research metrics As national research assessment exercises take root the prime examples currently are in the UK and Australia there is an increasing focus on the development of metrics that can measure aspects of research activity The only metric that has been in widespread use hitherto is the Journal Impact Factor JIF developed by the Institute for Scientific Information ISI now part of the Thomson Reuters group The metric was originally developed as a measure of the impact of individual journals and was intended as a tool for publishers It is calculated annually for all the journals covered by Thomson s Web of Science WoS database around 10 000 titles The JIF prevailed over two decades because no other provider had the breadth and depth of content to create alternative meaningful metrics for measuring anything else from the research literature This is now changing with other publishers developing rival databases The most important development though is that of the growing Open Access literature An Open Access global literature will provide bibliometricians around the world with the raw material to develop many new metrics for measuring and assessing research Citation analysis is just one way to analyse the research literature Some other candidate metrics are Citations CiteRank likeGoogle Co citations Downloads Citation download correlations Hub authority indicators Chrono indicators latency longevity Endogamy exogamy patterns Book citation indices Links in andout Commentaries h index and its variants Total co authors Articles published Years of publication Semiometrics latent semantic indexing text patterns etc Citation analysis Grants Number of research students Prizes medals list courtesy of Stevan Harnad For an overview of the current situation with respect to developing research metrics click here For an overview of how research performance may be measured using an Open Access literature click here Citation analysis for books and monographs Institutional Open Access policies are designed to collect mainly journal articles the literature which academic authors write with no expectation of direct financial reward As clear from the list above citation analysis is just one tool for assessing research effort in a university but it is extremely useful It is particularly appropriate for science and technology research where researchers publish many papers and cite the work of others heavily but less so for social science and especially the humanities where journal articles are not the predominant form of output In these disciplines monographs tend to be more important and citing behaviour is concomitantly very different A repository in a typical university will therefore contain large numbers of

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=81%3Aarticles&id=165%3Ainstitutional-repositories-for-research-management-and-assessment&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=335 (2016-02-01)
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  • Institutional Managers & Policy Makers
    Administrators Public Students Sign In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community RSS feed Institutional Managers Policy Makers Articles Topics Institutional Advantages for Open Access Open Access Repositories Business Aspects of Institutional Repositories Institutional Repositories for Research Management and Assessment Institutional Policies Developing an Institutional Open Access Policy The Optimal Open Access Policy for Institutions Researchers and

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=36&Itemid=335 (2016-02-01)
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