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  • Access to research and the impact on real people
    determine the best method of treatment Sommer also contacted leading scientists studying the disease and helped link their labs spawning new research projects Today Sommers works at Duke conducting research on the causes of chordoma and feels empowered to fight the disease The NIH policy allows patients to find vital information online for free to help them understand their condition and advocate for the best healthcare Heather Joseph When Heather Joseph s five year old son was diagnosed with autoimmune insulin dependent Type 1 Diabetes she did what many worried parents should do She got online and looked for every piece of current information she could find on the condition Joseph first signed on at 3 a m after returning from a trip to the hospital with her son I was desperate for information that could reassure me that there was something else I could do besides wake my child up twice a night to check his blood sugar for signs of hypoglycemia she says Joseph discovered a 2008 study of continuous glucose monitors rating parent and patient satisfaction in the prevention of nighttime instances of low blood sugar She found the information in the researcher s final manuscript posted

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=82%3Aarticles&id=548%3Aaccess-to-research-and-the-impact-on-real-people&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=370 (2016-02-01)
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  • Public
    Publishers Administrators Public Students Sign In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community RSS feed Public Articles Topics Access to research and the impact on real people

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=37&Itemid=370 (2016-02-01)
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  • What can students do?
    Open Access on your campus Learn how to write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper organize an event on campus pass a resolution in your student government or ask your student organization to support Open Access SHOW YOUR SUPPORT Tell the world you want Open Access to research Click here for information about buttons stickers adding us on your favorite social networking site and other ways to

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=83%3Aarticles&id=609%3Awhat-can-students-do&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=408 (2016-02-01)
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  • Students
    Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community RSS feed Students Articles Topics What can students do Education and journal cost Students declining access to research HIgh journal

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=38&Itemid=408 (2016-02-01)
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  • Journals, the Cost of Education, and the Value We (Don't) Get for Our Money
    Davidson Middlebury Reed Rhodes Trinity and 73 others is 1 302 498 That means on average a student at one of the Oberlin Group schools will pay 590 per year or 2 360 over the course of a four year college career If you go to a large research institution that number is likely much higher the average journal budget for the 123 research libraries that compose the Association of Research Libraries is 7 379 928 1 with many spending far in excess of 10 000 000 per year While these expenditures are necessary to provide students with information crucial to their education their growth over the past decade as a proportion of library spending and as a component of the overall cost of education has resulted in less rather than greater access This decline in access has occurred because library budgets cannot keep pace with skyrocketing journal prices Though we are paying more than ever we receive access to less and less material As journal prices continue to rise rapidly and library budgets shrink or at best in this weak economy stay the same the inevitable result will be a lack of access for students Given our right to

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=83%3Aarticles&id=608%3Ajournals-the-cost-of-education-and-the-value-we-dont-get-for-our-money&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=409 (2016-02-01)
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  • Students' Declining Access to Research
    The University of Washington at Pullman noted this in its recent Libraries Journal Cancellation Project 2009 Once again we have completed the difficult but necessary task of trimming our journal subscriptions in anticipation of a steep increase in costs The task grows more difficult each year since we are now losing access to core periodicals in some disciplines During this time the library materials budget has been flat we have not received increases to cover inflation in books or journals Journal inflation including access to abstracting and indexing services is running between 5 and 10 annually We now have this year s budget figures and again there is no money to keep offering the access we currently have We are going to have to cancel somewhere around 600 000 of journals approximately 15 of our remaining subscriptions This trend shows no sign of abating According to Library Journal prices of subscription based journals increased nine to ten percent in 2008 exacerbated by an extremely weak dollar Given the continuing slide of the dollar increases in 2009 are expected to approach ten percent overall 2009 data already shows that the extremely weak and volatile U S economy will result in cuts to many library budgets As a direct result many journals will be cut because libraries simply can t afford to pay for them As the University of Georgia Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost noted on September 18 2008 in a letter to faculty staff and students Because of the downturn in the state s economy the UGA University Libraries like all campus units are facing a projected 6 budget reduction This reduction in the Libraries budget coupled with the rising cost of scholarly journals likely will result in the Libraries discontinuing some journal subscriptions In recent years

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=83%3Aarticles&id=607%3Astudents-declining-access-to-research&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=410 (2016-02-01)
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  • Students
    In Resources Briefing Papers Guides and Overviews Video Presentations The Open Access Map Open Access Tracking Project News from the community RSS feed Students Articles Topics What can students do Education and journal cost Students declining access to research HIgh

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=38&Itemid=410 (2016-02-01)
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  • High journal prices and journal sustainability
    in enzymology 8 844 International journal for numerical methods in engineering 8 073 Journal of geophysical research 7 902 Experimental brain research 7 712 Biopolymers 7 665 Oncogene 7 587 Journal of chemical physics 6 163 Biotechnology bioengineering CAN OPEN ACCESS JOURNALS SURVIVE WITHOUT SUBSCRIPTION INCOME Yes While open access journals don t rely on subscription income they do need revenue to operate The 3 000 peer reviewed journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals http www doaj org thrive on a variety of different revenue models including endowment sponsorship advertising author publication fees donations membership university or department sponsorship and others WHY DO SUBSCRIPTIONS COST SO MUCH The authors of journal articles including researchers like your professors and many graduate students aren t paid by publishers for the articles they write They contribute their papers for free and sometimes pay to advance the state of scholarship in their fields and to make a name for themselves as scholars and scientists What s more these scholars also freely contribute their time to review and often edit other articles before they re published While some journals particularly those published by scholarly societies and other non profit entities charge fair

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?view=article&catid=83%3Aarticles&id=606%3Ahigh-journal-prices-and-journal-sustainability&tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=&option=com_content&Itemid=411 (2016-02-01)
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