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  • Articles
    50 100 All Article Title 1 Institutional membership 2 Examples of successful library advocacy programmes 3 Supporting existing OA journals 4 Open Access Publishing Fees case studies 5 Paying Open Access Publishing Fees 6 The Institutional Repository Web Pages 7 General Open Access Information on Library Web Site 8 Library organisations that support Open Access activities 9 The Library Web Site and Open Access 10 Library run advocacy programmes on campus 11 Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals 12 Library Support for Open Access Journals 13 Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access 14 Repository Services 15 Business Models Costs and ROI 16 Uses of a Repository 17 Supporting a Repository 18 Establishing a Repository 19 Support and Implementation of Open Access 20 Promoting Open Access Start Prev 1 2 Next End Page 1 of 2 Topics OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=79%3Aarticles&layout=default&Itemid=356 (2016-02-01)
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  • Articles
    50 100 All Article Title 1 Institutional membership 2 Examples of successful library advocacy programmes 3 Supporting existing OA journals 4 Open Access Publishing Fees case studies 5 Paying Open Access Publishing Fees 6 The Institutional Repository Web Pages 7 General Open Access Information on Library Web Site 8 Library organisations that support Open Access activities 9 The Library Web Site and Open Access 10 Library run advocacy programmes on campus 11 Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals 12 Library Support for Open Access Journals 13 Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access 14 Repository Services 15 Business Models Costs and ROI 16 Uses of a Repository 17 Supporting a Repository 18 Establishing a Repository 19 Support and Implementation of Open Access 20 Promoting Open Access Start Prev 1 2 Next End Page 1 of 2 Topics OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=79%3Aarticles&layout=default&Itemid=357 (2016-02-01)
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  • Articles
    100 All Article Title 1 Institutional membership 2 Examples of successful library advocacy programmes 3 Supporting existing OA journals 4 Open Access Publishing Fees case studies 5 Paying Open Access Publishing Fees 6 The Institutional Repository Web Pages 7 General Open Access Information on Library Web Site 8 Library organisations that support Open Access activities 9 The Library Web Site and Open Access 10 Library run advocacy programmes on campus 11 Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals 12 Library Support for Open Access Journals 13 Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access 14 Repository Services 15 Business Models Costs and ROI 16 Uses of a Repository 17 Supporting a Repository 18 Establishing a Repository 19 Support and Implementation of Open Access 20 Promoting Open Access Start Prev 1 2 Next End Page 1 of 2 Topics OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web site

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=79%3Aarticles&layout=default&Itemid=358 (2016-02-01)
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  • Articles
    30 50 100 All Article Title 1 Institutional membership 2 Examples of successful library advocacy programmes 3 Supporting existing OA journals 4 Open Access Publishing Fees case studies 5 Paying Open Access Publishing Fees 6 The Institutional Repository Web Pages 7 General Open Access Information on Library Web Site 8 Library organisations that support Open Access activities 9 The Library Web Site and Open Access 10 Library run advocacy programmes on campus 11 Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals 12 Library Support for Open Access Journals 13 Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access 14 Repository Services 15 Business Models Costs and ROI 16 Uses of a Repository 17 Supporting a Repository 18 Establishing a Repository 19 Support and Implementation of Open Access 20 Promoting Open Access Start Prev 1 2 Next End Page 1 of 2 Topics OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=79%3Aarticles&layout=default&Itemid=403 (2016-02-01)
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  • Articles
    Article Title 1 Institutional membership 2 Examples of successful library advocacy programmes 3 Supporting existing OA journals 4 Open Access Publishing Fees case studies 5 Paying Open Access Publishing Fees 6 The Institutional Repository Web Pages 7 General Open Access Information on Library Web Site 8 Library organisations that support Open Access activities 9 The Library Web Site and Open Access 10 Library run advocacy programmes on campus 11 Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals 12 Library Support for Open Access Journals 13 Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access 14 Repository Services 15 Business Models Costs and ROI 16 Uses of a Repository 17 Supporting a Repository 18 Establishing a Repository 19 Support and Implementation of Open Access 20 Promoting Open Access Start Prev 1 2 Next End Page 1 of 2 Topics OA the mission of the Research Library Support Implementation of OA Open Access Repositories Establishing a Repository Supporting a Repository Uses of a Repository Business Models Costs and ROI Repository Services Open Access Journals Promoting and cataloguing Open Access Journals Supporting existing OA journals Promoting OA Library run advocacy programmes on campus Examples of successful library run advocacy programmes The library web site and Open

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=79%3Aarticles&layout=default&Itemid=257 (2016-02-01)
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  • Funders policy on Open Access
    the funder s position and requirements on the following things What should be self archived Funders usually specify that the completed final version of the manuscript once the peer review process has taken place and the author has made all the corrections and revisions should be deposited in an Open Access repository This ensures that users are able to access the final form of the article though it will not have the layout and mark up provided by the publisher Nonetheless for would be users who do not have access to the article through a journal subscription the author s final version is perfectly adequate Indeed from the perspective of research progress the author s final manuscript is far better than the published paper This is because the publisher generally provides the author with a PDF file of the article and this format is extremely difficult to re use New technologies for mining texts for meaning and facts so called semantic computer technologies work much better on articles in native file formats such as Word Research funders are eager that research findings are used as effectively as possible and so some are now including provision in their Open Access policies to make sure that self archived articles are in a file format that enables re use through these technological means Where authors should self archive their articles Funders may specify a particular repository for the articles as the Wellcome Trust and the NIH do In these cases they specify that authors must deposit their articles in PubMed Central or UK PubMed Central the UK service Some funders have repositories of their own Others in fact most stipulate that authors must self archive their articles into an Open Access repository but do not specify which This allows the author to choose

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=564%3Afunders-policy-on-open-access&catid=78%3Aarticles&Itemid=253 (2016-02-01)
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  • Policies on Open Access from institutions and funders
    the case of national or regional funders awarding reserch grants from the public purse there is an obligation to do what they can to maximise the value that will eventually accrue to the taxpayer from the work In the case of charities supporting research into particular issues they wish to ensure that their funding is used as effectively as possible to resolve those issues It has long been known that only mandatory policies are truly effective in gathering the body of Open Access research that is wanted A mandatory policy not only makes clear to researchers what is required and why but also serves to raise awareness about Open Access and the reasons why it is desirable Compliance rates with mandatory policies are much much higher than policies that simply advise authors about the issues and encourage them to make their work Open Access This is why new Open Access policies are almost all mandatory As a result the proportion of the world s research outputs that is freely available to all is growing The pages on institutional policies and funder policies describe in more detail the sort of requirements that are made of authors and give more detail on different types of policy Interestingly over recent times beginning with Harvard s Faculty of Arts Sciences early in 2008 individual faculties schools and departments in universities have been voting in their own mandatory Open Access policies many unanimously The list of existing Open Access policies can be found here along with policy details in most cases Authors are sometimes surprised at such moves considering that being obliged to make their work Open Access is somehow in contradiction to the cherished principle academic freedom This article by Professor Stuart Shieber of Harvard University discusses the issues See also Institutional policies on

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=563%3Apolicies-on-open-access-from-institutions-and-funders&catid=78%3Aarticles&Itemid=253 (2016-02-01)
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  • Greater Reach for your Research
    any major concerns that researchers may have and distinguishes IRs from other related initiatives in Canada all in a way that is easy to browse and read The brochure developed by the CARL Institutional Repositories Working Group and SPARC is available in both print and electronic formats The brochure can be ordered for a nominal fee through the CARL website or printed directly from the website so that institutions can

    Original URL path: http://www.openoasis.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=169:greater-reach-for-your-research&catid=78:articles&Itemid=361 (2016-02-01)
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