archive-org.com » ORG » O » OURPUBLICLANDS.ORG

Total: 424

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Our Public Lands
    Medicine From Our Blog Historic effort to protect greater sage grouse Job Opportunity Wyoming Wildlife Federation Rocky Mountain Regional Center welcomes new staff Take Boulder White Clouds off the waiting list Speak up for South Park one of the region s last great places More Drilling on moose habitat 58 000 public comments March 31 2011 The Bridger Teton National Forest has received 58 000 comments on its proposal to allow drilling in critical moose habitat in Wyoming OurPublicLands members contributed 2 500 comments in opposition to drilling on thousands of acres of critical moose habitat According to the Bridger Teton Forest Supervisor the majority of the comments received expressed concern for natural resources such as water air and wildlife In addition the Wyoming Game and Fish Department WGFD submitted comments stating that the draft environmental impact statement underestimates the negative impacts to wildlife Read the article about WGFD s comments here Read more about Drilling on moose habitat 58 000 public comments Take Action For Cutthroat Trout Hydraulic fracturing is a method used to extract natural gas that involves blasting a solution of water sand and chemicals into underground rock formations at high pressure Since 2005 this practice has been exempted from the Safe Drinking Water Act This exemption increases the risk that improperly managed development could lead to the fouling of underground aquifers many of which supply drinking water and are hydrologically connected with surface water fisheries TAKE ACTION to protect cutthroat trout from hydraulic fracturing chemicals Read more about Take Action For Cutthroat Trout Victory for Bighorn Sheep March 3 2011 Prior to the mid 1800s bighorn sheep were abundant throughout the West with numbers estimated at 1 5 to 2 million Large declines occurred because of overharvest habitat loss competition for forage and disease transmission from

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/node?page=64 (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Montana | Our Public Lands
    grouse listing may go to 2010 June 26 2009 In a lawsuit filed by Western Watersheds Project over the lack of federal protection for sage grouse the Idaho based group and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service agreed to extend the deadline for the federal agency to make a decision on whether greater sage grouse should be listed as endangered until February of 2010 Read the entire story NWF Protests Selected Lease Sales in Montana to protect wildlife On June 1 the National Wildlife Federation officially protested the leasing of four land parcels on BLM property in southwest Montana asserting that the latest science proves that lease stipulations are inadequate to protect sage grouse The leases are being offered across approximately 6 000 acres of prime sage grouse habitat within four miles of important sage grouse breeding leks in the Sweetwater basin near Dillon The area was recently identified by the state as an important core habitat for sage grouse The latest science shows that high density energy development with associated road construction power line installation and disturbance this close to sage grouse leks is likely to cause local extirpation of sage grouse breeding populations The protested parcels received no bids from industry during the June 16 auction whereas many other Montana parcels not under protest were leased for 10 year terms These are key areas for maintaining not only grouse but the entire range of wildlife found in this nearly pristine corner of southwest Montana said Ben Deeble NWF public lands organizer The BLM needs to start adjusting to the new scientific findings research which they themselves helped design and fund Otherwise they are managing for extinction 33 000 Acres Up For Lease in June Oil and Gas Lease Sale On June 16th 2009 the Bureau of Land Management BLM will offer 74 leases for sale covering nearly 33 000 acres in Montana See a map of the lease parcels BACKGROUND Montana covers about 94 million acres About 62 million acres of the underlying oil and gas or fluid mineral estate is controlled by private entities or by the state of Montana The remaining 32 million acres of fluid minerals are owned by the American public and administered by the Bureau of Land Management This includes minerals underlying all federal lands regardless of the agency that manages the surface as well as minerals that were retained in federal ownership when the government transferred ownership of the surface The federal government does not develop oil and gas itself but instead leases development rights to private industry Each BLM state office is required to hold lease sales at least four times per year BLM defers leasing in Montana s Centennial Valley for now Montana s Bureau of Land Management has proposed leasing for energy exploration and development nearly 30 square miles of the best pronghorn and sage grouse habitat in southwest Montana on the edge of the Centennial Valley and Red Rock river The valley is also home to the

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/about/montana (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Wyoming | Our Public Lands
    10 09 2012 Salazar approves massive Wyoming wind farm project 10 02 2012 Roadless Rule Upheld 04 25 2012 Grizzly Counts Under Review 04 18 2012 Wyoming s AML revenue stream slowing to a trickle Most AML dollars went to non mine related facilities more From Our Blog Historic effort to protect greater sage grouse Job Opportunity Wyoming Wildlife Federation Rocky Mountain Regional Center welcomes new staff Take Boulder White Clouds off the waiting list Speak up for South Park one of the region s last great places More Wyoming NWF and WWF hold Wyoming meetings on status of pronghorn mule deer herds The National Wildlife Federation and the Wyoming Wildlife Federation hosted public meetings in Wyoming to discuss the alarming decline of pronghorn and mule deer along the Colorado Wyoming Border The meetings took place Sept 13 15 in Laramie Saratoga and Rock Springs WY Click here to read about the meetings in the Rawlins Times Click here to read the full Colorado Wyoming Border Report Report Deer pronghorn numbers decline in Colorado Wyoming as demands on public lands rise A new report by the National Wildlife Federation details the trend of declining populations of mule deer and pronghorns in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming Veteran wildlife biologists John Ellenberger and Gene Byrne say data from the past 30 years show that growing demands on the landscape including more people and energy development are corresponding with animal numbers and slower rebounds from such cyclical pressures as drought and disease They urge more coordination of public land management and planning for increased energy development Click here to read full story Little Mountain Lease Sales The Greater Little Mountain Area located south of Rock Springs contains crucial habitat ranges for elk mule deer antelope and important riparian and watershed areas for

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/about/wyoming (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Colorado | Our Public Lands
    press release Legislation is being drafted first to combine the Wildlife Commission and the Parks Board into one body effective July 1 2011 During this year a transition planning team will work to define and prioritize the many complicated issues Additional legislation will be needed in 2012 to address numerous issues CWF believes it is essential that the transition planning be transparent and stakeholders have a meaningful role in this process See the statement below that CWF released on March 10 immediately before the joint meeting of the Wildlife Commission and the Parks Board CWF s Board Chair also made public comment CWF will update our website again when the legislation is introduced and as new developments occur New Oil and Gas Regulations for Colorado On Wednesday April 22nd Governor Ritter signed into law new rules for oil and gas development The new regulations will update 30 year old public health water and wildlife protections for oil and gas drilling History In 2007 the Colorado State Legislature passed a key bill requiring the Colorado Oil Gas Conservation Commission COGCC to write new rules with the Colorado Dept of Public Health and the Division of Wildlife to better protect wildlife and the general public during oil and gas operations After an 18 month rulemaking marathon Colorado adopted the most comprehensive state oil and gas drilling regulations in the nation on December 11th 2008 The 177 pages of rules aimed at better managing oil and gas development protecting wildlife and reducing impacts on people living near drilling operations were passed unanimously by the state s Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Among the protections the regulations impose are A 300 foot no drill buffer around streams used for drinking water supplies Controls on odors and dust on operations within a quarter mile of

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/about/colorado (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New Mexico | Our Public Lands
    Resource Management Plan for Otero Mesa BLM put together its plan in response to requests for oil and gas leases on Otero Mesa after Harvey E Yates Co struck natural gas there in 1997 In its decision the appeals court said that the BLM failed to consider an alternative that would have put the area off limits to drilling and did not adequately consider potential impacts of drilling on the area s diverse plant and animal life and on a large underground water source Since the plan was released in 2005 it has been met with staunch opposition from Governor Bill Richardson other state agencies and environmental groups who finally sued BLM over the plan The court ruled that the BLM must complete a more detailed environmental review including considering totally closing Otero Mesa to development showing more evidence for conclusions about impacts on the area s aquifer and appropriately weighing oil and gas development against other possible uses including conservation Read more about Otero Mesa Rio Grande Gorge Eyed for Protection New Mexico Senator Jeff Bingaman recently announced legislation to protect the cultural ecological recreational and scenic resources of public lands around the Rio Grande Gorge in Taos and Rio Arriba counties The El Rio Grande del Norte National Conservation Area Establishment Act which is co sponsored by Senator Tom Udall would protect approximately 235 980 acres of public land managed by the Bureau of Land Management The majority of this land 214 560 acres would classify the Rio Grande Gorge as a National Conservation Area Another 13 420 acres in Cerro de Yuta on the east side and 8 000 acres in Rio San Antonio in the west would be managed as wilderness Altogether the bill would protect key elk wintering grounds and migratory corridors along the plateau between Ute Mountain and San Antonio Mountain as well as protect habitat for other game species and birds of prey This bill will first go to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee My view Sportsmen must unite in support of public lands wildlife By Jacob Tolk LETTER TO EDITOR September 29 2007 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican The U S Senate is getting an earful from oil industry lobbyists who are out to get rich on New Mexico s public lands at our expense They re fixing to turn our Western public lands into an oil and gas pincushion The more Senators Jeff Bingaman and Pete Domenici hear from these slick hired guns the more likely it is that we will have to settle for watered down energy legislation that doesn t consider how New Mexicans want to use our land Like a lot of hunters and fishermen in New Mexico I m having a hard time seeing how our fish and game habitat can remain intact with all of the oil and gas drilling planned for our state in the years ahead The numbers are scary About 126 000 new wells are planned on public land

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/about/new-mexico (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Arizona Sonora Campaign | Our Public Lands
    lands issues with a monthly email Sign Up PO Box 51510 Mesa AZ 85208 Phone 480 644 0077 Fax 480 644 0078 awf azwildlife org www azwildlife org Sign Up to Receive Updates from Arizona Wildlife Federation and Our Public Lands Arizona News 07 12 2010 Arizona forest schedules meetings on proposed wilderness areas 07 07 2010 Arizona wildfire fully contained more From Our Blog Historic effort to protect greater sage grouse Job Opportunity Wyoming Wildlife Federation Rocky Mountain Regional Center welcomes new staff Take Boulder White Clouds off the waiting list Speak up for South Park one of the region s last great places More Arizona Sonora Campaign Arizona s Pristine Sonoran Desert is home to many wildlife including the Desert Bighorn Sheep desert tortoise and golden eagles As growth continues to push our urban boundaries further and further out Maricopa County is experiencing its last frontier Arizonans are coming together to enact a plan that protects Western Maricopa County for generations to come ensuring that wildlife recreation and development can coexist The Sonoran Desert Heritage campaign is a diverse partnership working to permanently protect Arizona s unique Sonoran Desert which provides abundant natural cultural receration and economic benefits

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/about/arizona (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Oil and Gas Development on Public Lands | Our Public Lands
    04 12 2016 Chadwick It s Time for Everyone to Pay for Wildlife Management 03 20 2016 NWF s O Mara lauds Wyoming Wildlife Federation defense of public lands 03 17 2016 BLM cancels disputed oil gas lease in Montana s Badger Two Medicine From Our Blog Historic effort to protect greater sage grouse Job Opportunity Wyoming Wildlife Federation Rocky Mountain Regional Center welcomes new staff Take Boulder White Clouds off the waiting list Speak up for South Park one of the region s last great places More Oil and Gas Development on Public Lands How is Oil and Gas Developed on Public Lands Land Use Plan Every 10 15 years federal land management agencies including the Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service must produce land and resource management plans These plans guide future land management and among other things identify areas suitable for oil and gas development Because it is impossible to predict future development scenarios accurately these plans generally are speculative and do not include site specific analysis of impacts Many plans remain outdated There are numerous steps to this process and several at which the public can provide input Find out more about the land use planning process here Lease Nomination Private companies nominate specific parcels of land for oil and gas development The responsible federal agency reviews the nomination and if it determines the land is suitable for development the agency may hold a competitive lease sale for the nominated lands No public participation or comment period for lease nominations exist If serious objections arise to the leasing of public lands the public s only recourse is to protest the lease sale to the federal agency Even during an ongoing lease protest however the agency can continue with the lease sale Leasing The federal land

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/developmentoverview (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Oil Shale Development | Our Public Lands
    shale oil development does not currently take place anywhere on the globe Recent record high gasoline prices have led the federal government to reevaluate oil shale as a potential source of domestic liquid fuel Before commercial scale oil shale development can be responsibly executed detailed research and development based on the best available science is necessary In December 2006 the BLM issued five 160 acre research and development leases for oil shale that will allow companies to test experimental methods to turn shale into oil However while the future of oil shale is still uncertain the BLM remains ready to develop a commercial oil shale leasing program by 2009 2010 With the rush to extract this resource companies may not be able to adequately develop their technology before BLM begins leasing Methods of Development Oil shale can be converted into oil using two similar methods The more traditional method involves mining the oil shale rock and then transporting it offsite where it is crushed and heated to temperatures topping 1000 F The resulting oil is then separated from the waste material and removed for processing Another conversion method called in situ involves heating the oil shale rock while it is still underground After heating the rock to extreme temperatures the oil and gas are extracted from the ground through conventional well technology Several methods of in situ production have been tried and abandoned Over the last 20 years Shell Oil Company has conducted small scale field tests on private land at its Mahogany Research Project in the Piceance Basin using a new process that slowly cooks the shale underground for a period of 2 3 years using electrical resistance heaters This method requires up to 25 heating holes per acre in order to heat the shale to 650 to 750 F and it also requires installation of production wells drilled between the heating wells to pump produced oil and gas to the surface Shell is also testing a freeze wall around the heating zone to prevent groundwater from mixing with produced hydrocarbons and residual pollutants which will be created by circulating refrigerant through yet more wells around the project s periphery Impacts The Green River Basin is not just home to large scale oil shale deposits but also supports some of the most valuable wildlife habitat in the U S The area supports an abundance of mule deer elk mountain lion black bear bald eagles and other outstanding wildlife species It also offers unparalleled outdoor recreation opportunities including hunting fishing and hiking Commercial scale oil shale production will require massive infrastructure including roads pipelines compressors tanks and drill rigs As stated above the in situ process requires up to 25 heating holes per acre plus additional holes for wells This level of development will likely spread over thousands of acres decreasing and dividing this superb wildlife habitat Shell s experimental in situ oil shale facility Piceance Basin Colorado U S Geological Survey The lands that hold the oil shale deposits

    Original URL path: http://www.ourpubliclands.org/oilshalebackground (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive



  •