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    selfing syndrome Previous Section Next Section Correlated polymorphism in cytotype and sexual system doi 10 1093 aob mcv167 Polyploidy has important effects on plant reproductive systems and previously has been implicated in the evolution of dimorphic reproductive strategies Miller et al pp 307 317 use flow cytometry observations of pollen production and morphological measurements to document the perfect association of tetraploidy with gender dimorphism or diploidy with cosexuality across 36 populations spanning the geographic range Molecular sequence data strongly confirm the monophyly of Lycium californicum and character mapping suggests that tetraploid dimorphic populations have arisen twice independently and in concert Interestingly the distribution of tetraploid dimorphic populations is restricted to populations in Arizona and the Baja California peninsula and may be associated with harsh environmental conditions Previous Section Next Section Density dependent reproduction regulated by kinship and tree size doi 10 1093 aob mcv170 Global pollinator declines and habitat fragmentation highlight the critical need to understand reproduction and gene flow across plant populations Castilla et al pp 319 329 use spatial reproductive and population genetic data to investigate the effects of tree size conspecific density and local kinship on maternal and paternal reproductive success in the understorey tree Miconia affinis in central Panama They found that large trees had lower proportions of viable seeds in their fruits but sired more seeds On average trees in more dense neighbourhoods produced more viable seeds per fruit but in dense neighbourhoods with high local kinship this positive density effect was offset by increased variability in the proportion of viable seeds per fruit Previous Section Next Section Style morph frequencies in tristylous Lythrum doi 10 1093 aob mcv173 A balance between stochastic processes and negative frequency dependent selection largely determines style morph frequencies in heterostylous populations Costa et al pp 331 340 investigate variation in morph frequencies at the southern European range limit of the tristylous wetland species Lythrum salicaria They find populations are predominantly trimorphic but progressively smaller in size and with larger deviations from the predicted 1 1 1 equilibrium towards the drier southern edge of the distribution This supports the hypothesis that deteriorating environmental conditions at range margins influence demographic features of populations and demonstrates the resilience of floral trimorphism in the face of stressful conditions Previous Section Next Section Examining the impact of heterospecific pollen deposition in the field doi 10 1093 aob mcv175 Most work on the impacts of heterospecific pollen deposition on plant fecundity has utilized hand pollination experiments in greenhouse settings and therefore we know little about the reproductive effects in the field Briggs et al pp 341 347 explored how patterns of naturally deposited heterospecific pollen relate to the reproductive output of Delphinium barbeyi Heterospecific pollen deposition is common but at low levels across stigmas there is a negative interaction between the effects of conspecific pollen and heterospecific pollen amount the effect of conspecific pollen on viable seed production becomes weaker with greater heterospecific deposition on stigmas Greenhouse hand pollination studies and field studies should be tightly integrated in future to better understand how heterospecific pollen transfer can be detrimental for plant reproduction Previous Section Leaf mechanical traits in insect herbivory doi 10 1093 aob mcv178 Leaf mechanical traits deter insect herbivores but little is known about the role of particular mechanical traits across feeding guilds Caldwell et al pp 349 361 investigated feeding damage in relation to mechanical traits in mature leaves of shrubs and trees finding that mechanical traits influenced feeding guilds differentially Chewing damage correlated negatively with mechanical traits with the strongest independent contribution by specific work toughness to shear Mining damage did not correlate with mechanical traits and sucker feeding density correlated positively Knowing how mechanical traits influence insect feeding across guilds is important to our wider understanding of plant herbivore interactions The Author 2016 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company All rights reserved For Permissions please email journals permissions oup com Related articles Review Philip J White Selenium accumulation by plants Ann Bot 2016 117 2 217 235 first published online December 29 2015 doi 10 1093 aob mcv180 Abstract Full Text HTML Full Text PDF Free Figures Original Article Elizabeth A Sinclair John Statton Renae Hovey Janet M Anthony Kingsley W Dixon and Gary A Kendrick Reproduction at the extremes pseudovivipary hybridization and genetic mosaicism in Posidonia australis Posidoniaceae Ann Bot 2016 117 2 237 247 first published online November 17 2015 doi 10 1093 aob mcv162 Abstract Full Text HTML Full Text PDF Free Figures Supplementary Data Original Article Froukje M Postma Sverre Lundemo and Jon Ågren Seed dormancy cycling and mortality differ between two locally adapted populations of Arabidopsis thaliana Ann Bot 2016 117 2 249 256 first published online December 3 2015 doi 10 1093 aob mcv171 Abstract Full Text HTML Full Text PDF Free Figures Supplementary Data Original Article Kamesh C Regmi Shangji Zhang and Roberto A Gaxiola Apoplasmic loading in the rice phloem supported by the presence of sucrose synthase and plasma membrane localized proton pyrophosphatase Ann Bot 2016 117 2 257 268 first published online November 26 2015 doi 10 1093 aob mcv174 Abstract Full Text HTML Full Text PDF Free Figures Supplementary Data Original Article Michaela Sonnleitner Karl Hülber Ruth Flatscher Pedro Escobar García Manuela Winkler Jan Suda Peter Schönswetter and Gerald M Schneeweiss Ecological differentiation of diploid and polyploid cytotypes of Senecio carniolicus sensu lato Asteraceae is stronger in areas of sympatry Ann Bot 2016 117 2 269 276 first published online December 11 2015 doi 10 1093 aob mcv176 Abstract Full Text HTML Full Text PDF Free Figures Supplementary Data Original Article Regine Claßen Bockhoff and Charlotte Meyer Space matters meristem expansion triggers corona formation in Passiflora Ann Bot 2016 117 2 277 290 first published online December 11 2015 doi 10 1093 aob mcv177 Abstract Full Text HTML Full Text PDF Free Figures Original Article Sandra V Rojas Nossa José María Sánchez and Luis Navarro Effects of nectar robbing on male and female

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  • Plant Cuttings
    formidable defence how do earthworms manage to digest such well defended leaves A good question and one which Manuel Liebeke et al 12 appear to have solved The team discovered that the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus 13 14 whose eminently apt international common name in English is the leaf worm 15 contains metabolites in its gut which counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on its gut enzymes These dialkylfuransulfonate compounds whose proposed name is drilodefensins increase in concentration in response to diets high in polyphenols Full Text of this Article Previous Next Article Table of Contents This Article Ann Bot 2016 117 2 iii vi doi 10 1093 aob mcv197 Extract Free Full Text HTML Free Full Text PDF Free Classifications Plant Cuttings news in botany Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Alert me if commented Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Responses Submit a response No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google Mendeley Twitter What s this Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online Self archiving policy Instructions for

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  • Plant Cuttings
    which is doubly important relevant because conditions which lead to drought e g low rainfall high temperatures often lead to drying out of plant material which enhances its flammability At the risk of making a bad and phytotaxonomically incorrect pun is this an example of fighting fire with fir 10 As always with small scale laboratory based studies there is a need to see if this also works in the real world natural situation 11 Testing this would presumably require stands of suitably mixed forest and people to deliberately set them alight I don t know where you d get such individuals from maybe you d need to advertise for participants So can you imagine the advert which may start thus Arsonists wanted Previous experience not essential Plants architects of their own downfall Discuss Any resultant reduction in spread and severity of forest fires is to be welcomed because there is evidence that globally elevated CO 2 levels are encouraging greater vegetation growth that reduces streamflow water from which source may be necessary to extinguish the fires 12 Or imagine the reluctant arsonist s autobiography entitled No burning ambition Image Wikimedia Commons 1 Daniela Shebitz et al http depts washington edu propplnt 2003guidelines group1 Smoke 20Infusion htm 2 David Nelson et al Annual Review of Plant Biology 63 107 130 2012 3 https en wikipedia org wiki Fire ecology 4 https en wikipedia org wiki Wildfire 5 https en wikipedia org wiki 2015 California wildfires 6 https en wikipedia org wiki 2015 Sampson Flat bushfires 7 http elpais com m elpais 2012 08 14 inenglish 1344943477 469339 html 8 https en wikipedia org wiki Cupressus sempervirens 9 Journal of Environmental Management 159 2015 68e77 http dx doi org 10 1016 j jenvman 2015 05 020 10 http www phrases org uk meanings fight fire with fire html 11 http www sciencedaily com releases 2015 09 150922115458 htm utm source feedburner utm me 12 Anna Ukkola et al Nature Climate Change doi 10 1038 NCLIMATE2831 Previous Section Next Section Plants and Pinatubo Prestahnukur Popocatépetl Plants are generally sessile organisms that unlike their puny animal cousins can t get up and run away if the environment is not to their liking Botanicals by and large put up and shut up Accordingly that fundamental fact of their existence has led them to adapt to a remarkable array of abiotic factors e g temperature drought high light levels low light levels excess UV salinity fire heavy metals herbivory etc Yet however long and imaginative that list may be what are the chances that you would have included volcanoes ruptures on the Earth s crust that allow hot lava volcanic ash and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface 1 Pretty low I imagine Yet these are a natural hazard and some plants appear not so surprisingly to have adaptations that have been driven by this most incendiary of geological phenomena At least that is the suggestion from a study of the epidermis of cycads 2 3 by Maria Rosaria et al 4 Using a range of light fluorescence and electron microscope techniques they investigated micromorphological features of the cuticles of 12 of the 14 recognised extant species in the genus Dioon 5 6 which taxa are native to present day Mexico and central America Structural similarities between stomata in modern day Dioon and extinct Dioon like Pseudoctenis ornata from c 115 millions of years ago lead to the notion that volcanism may have led to the development of this particular feature Why Pseudoctenis ornata grew at a time and in a habitat where volcanic events and related phenomena were commonplace and previous work by Ana Archangelska et al 7 has suggested that its cuticular features may indicate adaptations to volcanic stress Developing that idea Rosaria et al 8 propose that the structure of the Dioon stomatal complex could represent a response to the high level of volcanic activity in the genus evolutionary past in the Mesozoic allowing the plant to avoid the occlusion of stomatal pores by volcanic ash and the penetration of toxic gases and to survive those particular environmental conditions An intriguing case of palaeoforensic botany if ever there was but giving insights into some of the environmental conditions plants have had to withstand during their terrestrial tenure Ed for those looking for experimental studies into the effects of modern day volcanism on plant cuticles I ve tracked down a PhD thesis by Bartiromo Antonello from 2011 9 to whet your appetite Image Wikimedia Commons 1 https en wikipedia org wiki Volcano 2 http plantnet rbgsyd nsw gov au PlantNet cycad cycintro html 3 https en wikipedia org wiki Cycad 4 Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 179 236 254 2015 doi 10 1111 boj 12326 5 http www cycad org documents Key to the Species of Dioon pdf 6 https en wikipedia org wiki Dioon 7 Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 89 213 133 1995 doi 10 1016 0034 6667 95 00011 X 8 http www geosociety org science timescale 9 https tel archives ouvertes fr tel 00865651 document Previous Section Curious case of Cape coprobotany Now and please be honest if you saw an article entitled Faecal mimicry by seeds ensures dispersal by dung beetles you d want to read it right Well in case you haven t seen that item I ll do my best to summarise the study for you and place it in a wider context By the way I do hope you re not just about to start in the middle of just finished breakfast lunch dinner supper As fairly stationary organisms plants have a major problem if they are to realise any ambitions to expand their territory occupy new areas and capture more life sustaining resources The best hope seed plants have of seeking out new spaces in which to establish grow and prosper is as a seed 1 a dispersal unit that is potentially highly mobile But that s not a

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  • Venerable Trees: History, Biology and Conservation in the Bluegrass Tom Kimmerer
    unlikely to ever visit However the book soon Full Text of this Article Previous Next Article Table of Contents This Article Ann Bot 2016 117 2 vi doi 10 1093 aob mcv188 Extract Free Full Text HTML Free Full Text PDF Free Classifications Book Review Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Alert me if commented Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Responses Submit a response No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Barnett J PubMed Articles by Barnett J Agricola Articles by Barnett J Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google Mendeley Twitter What s this Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online Self archiving policy Instructions for authors Low Rate Open Access Fees Open access options for authors visit Oxford Open Visit HighWire Press 3hWaciBYRk30rSOQ7UOpP6viAxsZnEle true Looking for your next opportunity Looking for jobs Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Rights Permissions This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics COPE Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Widget Get a Widget

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  • Venerable Trees: History, Biology and Conservation in the Bluegrass Tom Kimmerer
    Kimmerer says was introduced from Europe and planted so extensively as a fodder crop that biologists do not now know what native grasses were there before settlement The settlers removed many of the trees for timber with the result that relatively few of what might be called ancient or venerable trees remain Fortunately they also left trees to provide shade for their cattle and horses and it is these trees that form the subject of the book Kimmerer argues convincingly that woodland pasture was created not by the activities of settlers or native people clearing land for agriculture or by burning by the native peoples as an aid to hunting but rather by nomadic grazing animals In Kentucky this would have been the numerous bison the settlers found when they arrived in 1779 and in Europe the European bison and aurochs This was aided by the nature of the geology of the region the limestone allowing water to drain away quickly creating droughts in a region of apparently good rainfall This in turn favoured the deep rooted trees found today over more shallow rooted species In addition to the chapters describing individual trees and the nature of woodland pasture the author devotes chapters to methods for the conservation of the habitat which has relevance for woodland pasture in the UK and Europe how to extend the lives of old trees and finally the future of venerable trees and woodland pasture The book is lavishly illustrated with numerous monochrome photographs and 24 beautiful colour plates It takes an interesting and fascinating approach to the topic and I enjoyed reading it very much I would also add that it is very reasonably priced The author says he wrote the book not to recount how much we know about the trees their management and their future but to remind us how little we know I certainly now feel I know a lot more The Author 2016 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company All rights reserved For Permissions please email journals permissions oup com Previous Next Article Table of Contents This Article Ann Bot 2016 117 2 vi doi 10 1093 aob mcv188 Extract Free Full Text HTML Free Full Text PDF Free Classifications Book Review Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Alert me if commented Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Responses Submit a response No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Barnett J PubMed Articles by Barnett J Agricola Articles by Barnett J Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google Mendeley Twitter What s this Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article

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  • Venerable Trees: History, Biology and Conservation in the Bluegrass Tom Kimmerer

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