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    RefWorks Click here to download and save the file RefWorks format Mac Win Zotero Ris format FireFox Plugin Request an additional format be added to this list Help If you are unable to import citations please contact technical support for your product directly links go to external sites EndNote ProCite Reference Manager RefWorks Zotero Bookends Mendeley EndNote Web Papers EasyBib You may also send us feedback Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online Self archiving policy Instructions for authors Low Rate Open Access Fees Open access options for authors visit Oxford Open Visit HighWire Press 3hWaciBYRk30rSOQ7UOpP6viAxsZnEle true Looking for your next opportunity Looking for jobs Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Rights Permissions This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics COPE Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Widget Get a Widget Most Most Read Calcium in Plants Pollen Tube Distribution in the Kiwifruit Actinidia deliciosaA Chev C F Liang Pistil in Relation to its Reproductive Process Homeosis in Araceae Flowers The Case of Philodendron melinonii The Supramolecular Organization of Red Algal Vacuole Membrane Visualized by Freeze fracture Biological nitrogen fixation in non legume plants View all Most Read articles Most Cited An update on receptor like kinase involvement in the maintenance of plant cell wall

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/citmgr?gca=annbot%3B117%2F2%2Fiii (2016-02-18)
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  • Ann Bot -- Electronic Letters Guideline and Licence Terms
    letter All E letters are eligible for publication in the paper version of Annals of Botany and all other Annals of Botany related publications in all cases in any present or future medium If patients could recognise themselves from your description please obtain their written consent to publication before sending your E letter You will be able to download the consent form from the submission page Your E letters must be original and not infringe any third party s intellectual property rights You must declare any competing financial interests You will be able to read our guidance notes on the submission page Once your E letter has been published on the website or in the print version of the journal you will not have the right to have it removed or edited The Editor in Chief and Oxford University Press shall however have the right to remove any E letter at their discretion Licence to Publish Before you submit any E letters you must first read and agree to the following Licence to Publish Please read the licence and click on the button below to confirm your agreement to it and to move to the E letters submission page Oxford University Press is hereby granted a licence to publish my E letter in all languages and media and to grant third party permissions to republish my E letter in whole or parts thereof in any medium without limitation I warrant that my E letter is free of plagiarism and that I have exercised reasonable care to ensure that it is accurate and to the best of my knowledge does not contain anything that is libellous or obscene or infringes on anyone s copyright right of privacy or other rights I warrant that I will declare any competing financial interests that I may have When you submit an E letter you agree to both the Guidelines and the Licence to Publish Press I Agree if you agree to the guidelines and to the terms of this licence Press I Don t Agree if you do not agree to the guidelines and to the terms of this licence Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online Self archiving policy Instructions for authors Low Rate Open Access Fees Open access options for authors visit Oxford Open Visit HighWire Press 3hWaciBYRk30rSOQ7UOpP6viAxsZnEle true Looking for your next opportunity Looking for jobs Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Rights Permissions This journal is a member of

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/letters/submit/annbot;117/2/iii (2016-02-18)
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  • Plant Cuttings
    manage to digest such well defended leaves A good question and one which Manuel Liebeke et al 12 appear to have solved The team discovered that the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus 13 14 whose eminently apt international common name in English is the leaf worm 15 contains metabolites in its gut which counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on its gut enzymes These dialkylfuransulfonate compounds whose proposed name is drilodefensins increase in concentration in response to diets high in polyphenols Full Text of this Article This article has not yet been cited by other articles Previous Next Article Table of Contents This Article Ann Bot 2016 117 2 iii vi doi 10 1093 aob mcv197 Extract Free Full Text HTML Free Full Text PDF Free Classifications Plant Cuttings news in botany Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Alert me if commented Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Responses Submit a response No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google Mendeley Twitter What s this Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/content/117/2/iii.short?cited-by=yes&legid=annbot;117/2/iii (2016-02-18)
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  • Annals of Botany
    Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online Self archiving policy Instructions for authors Low Rate Open Access Fees Open access options for authors visit Oxford Open Visit HighWire Press 3hWaciBYRk30rSOQ7UOpP6viAxsZnEle true Looking for your next opportunity Looking for jobs Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Rights Permissions This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics COPE Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Widget Get a Widget Most Most Read Calcium in Plants Pollen Tube Distribution in the Kiwifruit Actinidia deliciosaA Chev C F Liang Pistil in Relation to its Reproductive Process Homeosis in Araceae Flowers The Case of Philodendron melinonii The Supramolecular Organization of Red Algal Vacuole Membrane Visualized by Freeze fracture Biological nitrogen fixation in non legume plants View all Most Read articles Most Cited An update on receptor like kinase involvement in the maintenance of plant cell wall integrity Arrangement of mixed linkage glucan and glucuronoarabinoxylan in the cell walls of growing maize roots Understanding polysaccharide production and properties using seed coat mutants future perspectives for the exploitation of natural variants Molecular control of seasonal flowering in rice arabidopsis and temperate cereals A footprint of past climate change on the diversity and population structure of Miscanthus sinensis View all Most Cited articles Online ISSN

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/crossref-forward-links/117/2/iii (2016-02-18)
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  • Plant Cuttings
    how do earthworms manage to digest such well defended leaves A good question and one which Manuel Liebeke et al 12 appear to have solved The team discovered that the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus 13 14 whose eminently apt international common name in English is the leaf worm 15 contains metabolites in its gut which counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on its gut enzymes These dialkylfuransulfonate compounds whose proposed name is drilodefensins increase in concentration in response to diets high in polyphenols Full Text of this Article No Related Web Pages Previous Next Article Table of Contents This Article Ann Bot 2016 117 2 iii vi doi 10 1093 aob mcv197 Extract Free Full Text HTML Free Full Text PDF Free Classifications Plant Cuttings news in botany Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Alert me if commented Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Responses Submit a response No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google Mendeley Twitter What s this Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online Self archiving policy

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/content/117/2/iii.short?related-urls=yes&legid=annbot;117/2/iii (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mail a friend
    Your message will read I thought you might be interested in the article I found in the publication Annals of Botany Search this journal Advanced Current Issue February 2016 117 2 Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Annals of Botany Collections AoB article attracts media coverage We are mobile find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company Impact factor 3 654 5 Yr impact factor 4 338 Eigenfactor 0 02603 Rank 10 200 SCImago Score 1 461 Rank 124 1873 Chief Editor Professor J S Pat Heslop Harrison View full editorial board International Review Board For Authors Submitting a manuscript online Self archiving policy Instructions for authors Low Rate Open Access Fees Open access options for authors visit Oxford Open Visit HighWire Press 3hWaciBYRk30rSOQ7UOpP6viAxsZnEle true Looking for your next opportunity Looking for jobs Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Rights Permissions This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics COPE Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Widget Get a Widget Most Most Read Calcium in Plants Pollen Tube Distribution in the Kiwifruit Actinidia deliciosaA Chev C F Liang Pistil in Relation to its Reproductive Process Homeosis in Araceae Flowers The Case of Philodendron melinonii The Supramolecular Organization of Red Algal Vacuole Membrane Visualized by Freeze fracture Biological nitrogen fixation in non legume plants View all Most Read articles Most Cited An update on receptor like kinase involvement in the maintenance of plant cell wall integrity Arrangement of mixed linkage glucan and glucuronoarabinoxylan in the cell walls of growing maize roots Understanding polysaccharide production and properties using seed coat mutants future perspectives for the exploitation of natural variants Molecular control of seasonal flowering in rice arabidopsis and temperate cereals A

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/email?gca=annbot%3B117%2F2%2Fiii¤t-view-path=/content/117/2/iii.short (2016-02-18)
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  • Plant Cuttings
    because conditions which lead to drought e g low rainfall high temperatures often lead to drying out of plant material which enhances its flammability At the risk of making a bad and phytotaxonomically incorrect pun is this an example of fighting fire with fir 10 As always with small scale laboratory based studies there is a need to see if this also works in the real world natural situation 11 Testing this would presumably require stands of suitably mixed forest and people to deliberately set them alight I don t know where you d get such individuals from maybe you d need to advertise for participants So can you imagine the advert which may start thus Arsonists wanted Previous experience not essential Plants architects of their own downfall Discuss Any resultant reduction in spread and severity of forest fires is to be welcomed because there is evidence that globally elevated CO 2 levels are encouraging greater vegetation growth that reduces streamflow water from which source may be necessary to extinguish the fires 12 Or imagine the reluctant arsonist s autobiography entitled No burning ambition Image Wikimedia Commons 1 Daniela Shebitz et al http depts washington edu propplnt 2003guidelines group1 Smoke 20Infusion htm 2 David Nelson et al Annual Review of Plant Biology 63 107 130 2012 3 https en wikipedia org wiki Fire ecology 4 https en wikipedia org wiki Wildfire 5 https en wikipedia org wiki 2015 California wildfires 6 https en wikipedia org wiki 2015 Sampson Flat bushfires 7 http elpais com m elpais 2012 08 14 inenglish 1344943477 469339 html 8 https en wikipedia org wiki Cupressus sempervirens 9 Journal of Environmental Management 159 2015 68e77 http dx doi org 10 1016 j jenvman 2015 05 020 10 http www phrases org uk meanings fight fire with fire html 11 http www sciencedaily com releases 2015 09 150922115458 htm utm source feedburner utm me 12 Anna Ukkola et al Nature Climate Change doi 10 1038 NCLIMATE2831 Previous Section Next Section Plants and Pinatubo Prestahnukur Popocatépetl Plants are generally sessile organisms that unlike their puny animal cousins can t get up and run away if the environment is not to their liking Botanicals by and large put up and shut up Accordingly that fundamental fact of their existence has led them to adapt to a remarkable array of abiotic factors e g temperature drought high light levels low light levels excess UV salinity fire heavy metals herbivory etc Yet however long and imaginative that list may be what are the chances that you would have included volcanoes ruptures on the Earth s crust that allow hot lava volcanic ash and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface 1 Pretty low I imagine Yet these are a natural hazard and some plants appear not so surprisingly to have adaptations that have been driven by this most incendiary of geological phenomena At least that is the suggestion from a study of the epidermis of cycads 2 3 by Maria Rosaria et al 4 Using a range of light fluorescence and electron microscope techniques they investigated micromorphological features of the cuticles of 12 of the 14 recognised extant species in the genus Dioon 5 6 which taxa are native to present day Mexico and central America Structural similarities between stomata in modern day Dioon and extinct Dioon like Pseudoctenis ornata from c 115 millions of years ago lead to the notion that volcanism may have led to the development of this particular feature Why Pseudoctenis ornata grew at a time and in a habitat where volcanic events and related phenomena were commonplace and previous work by Ana Archangelska et al 7 has suggested that its cuticular features may indicate adaptations to volcanic stress Developing that idea Rosaria et al 8 propose that the structure of the Dioon stomatal complex could represent a response to the high level of volcanic activity in the genus evolutionary past in the Mesozoic allowing the plant to avoid the occlusion of stomatal pores by volcanic ash and the penetration of toxic gases and to survive those particular environmental conditions An intriguing case of palaeoforensic botany if ever there was but giving insights into some of the environmental conditions plants have had to withstand during their terrestrial tenure Ed for those looking for experimental studies into the effects of modern day volcanism on plant cuticles I ve tracked down a PhD thesis by Bartiromo Antonello from 2011 9 to whet your appetite Image Wikimedia Commons 1 https en wikipedia org wiki Volcano 2 http plantnet rbgsyd nsw gov au PlantNet cycad cycintro html 3 https en wikipedia org wiki Cycad 4 Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 179 236 254 2015 doi 10 1111 boj 12326 5 http www cycad org documents Key to the Species of Dioon pdf 6 https en wikipedia org wiki Dioon 7 Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 89 213 133 1995 doi 10 1016 0034 6667 95 00011 X 8 http www geosociety org science timescale 9 https tel archives ouvertes fr tel 00865651 document Previous Section Curious case of Cape coprobotany Now and please be honest if you saw an article entitled Faecal mimicry by seeds ensures dispersal by dung beetles you d want to read it right Well in case you haven t seen that item I ll do my best to summarise the study for you and place it in a wider context By the way I do hope you re not just about to start in the middle of just finished breakfast lunch dinner supper As fairly stationary organisms plants have a major problem if they are to realise any ambitions to expand their territory occupy new areas and capture more life sustaining resources The best hope seed plants have of seeking out new spaces in which to establish grow and prosper is as a seed 1 a dispersal unit that is potentially highly mobile But that s not a lot of good unless the

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/content/117/2/iii.full?cited-by=yes&legid=annbot;117/2/iii (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Plant Cuttings
    doubly important relevant because conditions which lead to drought e g low rainfall high temperatures often lead to drying out of plant material which enhances its flammability At the risk of making a bad and phytotaxonomically incorrect pun is this an example of fighting fire with fir 10 As always with small scale laboratory based studies there is a need to see if this also works in the real world natural situation 11 Testing this would presumably require stands of suitably mixed forest and people to deliberately set them alight I don t know where you d get such individuals from maybe you d need to advertise for participants So can you imagine the advert which may start thus Arsonists wanted Previous experience not essential Plants architects of their own downfall Discuss Any resultant reduction in spread and severity of forest fires is to be welcomed because there is evidence that globally elevated CO 2 levels are encouraging greater vegetation growth that reduces streamflow water from which source may be necessary to extinguish the fires 12 Or imagine the reluctant arsonist s autobiography entitled No burning ambition Image Wikimedia Commons 1 Daniela Shebitz et al http depts washington edu propplnt 2003guidelines group1 Smoke 20Infusion htm 2 David Nelson et al Annual Review of Plant Biology 63 107 130 2012 3 https en wikipedia org wiki Fire ecology 4 https en wikipedia org wiki Wildfire 5 https en wikipedia org wiki 2015 California wildfires 6 https en wikipedia org wiki 2015 Sampson Flat bushfires 7 http elpais com m elpais 2012 08 14 inenglish 1344943477 469339 html 8 https en wikipedia org wiki Cupressus sempervirens 9 Journal of Environmental Management 159 2015 68e77 http dx doi org 10 1016 j jenvman 2015 05 020 10 http www phrases org uk meanings fight fire with fire html 11 http www sciencedaily com releases 2015 09 150922115458 htm utm source feedburner utm me 12 Anna Ukkola et al Nature Climate Change doi 10 1038 NCLIMATE2831 Previous Section Next Section Plants and Pinatubo Prestahnukur Popocatépetl Plants are generally sessile organisms that unlike their puny animal cousins can t get up and run away if the environment is not to their liking Botanicals by and large put up and shut up Accordingly that fundamental fact of their existence has led them to adapt to a remarkable array of abiotic factors e g temperature drought high light levels low light levels excess UV salinity fire heavy metals herbivory etc Yet however long and imaginative that list may be what are the chances that you would have included volcanoes ruptures on the Earth s crust that allow hot lava volcanic ash and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface 1 Pretty low I imagine Yet these are a natural hazard and some plants appear not so surprisingly to have adaptations that have been driven by this most incendiary of geological phenomena At least that is the suggestion from a study of the epidermis of cycads 2 3 by Maria Rosaria et al 4 Using a range of light fluorescence and electron microscope techniques they investigated micromorphological features of the cuticles of 12 of the 14 recognised extant species in the genus Dioon 5 6 which taxa are native to present day Mexico and central America Structural similarities between stomata in modern day Dioon and extinct Dioon like Pseudoctenis ornata from c 115 millions of years ago lead to the notion that volcanism may have led to the development of this particular feature Why Pseudoctenis ornata grew at a time and in a habitat where volcanic events and related phenomena were commonplace and previous work by Ana Archangelska et al 7 has suggested that its cuticular features may indicate adaptations to volcanic stress Developing that idea Rosaria et al 8 propose that the structure of the Dioon stomatal complex could represent a response to the high level of volcanic activity in the genus evolutionary past in the Mesozoic allowing the plant to avoid the occlusion of stomatal pores by volcanic ash and the penetration of toxic gases and to survive those particular environmental conditions An intriguing case of palaeoforensic botany if ever there was but giving insights into some of the environmental conditions plants have had to withstand during their terrestrial tenure Ed for those looking for experimental studies into the effects of modern day volcanism on plant cuticles I ve tracked down a PhD thesis by Bartiromo Antonello from 2011 9 to whet your appetite Image Wikimedia Commons 1 https en wikipedia org wiki Volcano 2 http plantnet rbgsyd nsw gov au PlantNet cycad cycintro html 3 https en wikipedia org wiki Cycad 4 Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 179 236 254 2015 doi 10 1111 boj 12326 5 http www cycad org documents Key to the Species of Dioon pdf 6 https en wikipedia org wiki Dioon 7 Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 89 213 133 1995 doi 10 1016 0034 6667 95 00011 X 8 http www geosociety org science timescale 9 https tel archives ouvertes fr tel 00865651 document Previous Section Curious case of Cape coprobotany Now and please be honest if you saw an article entitled Faecal mimicry by seeds ensures dispersal by dung beetles you d want to read it right Well in case you haven t seen that item I ll do my best to summarise the study for you and place it in a wider context By the way I do hope you re not just about to start in the middle of just finished breakfast lunch dinner supper As fairly stationary organisms plants have a major problem if they are to realise any ambitions to expand their territory occupy new areas and capture more life sustaining resources The best hope seed plants have of seeking out new spaces in which to establish grow and prosper is as a seed 1 a dispersal unit that is potentially highly mobile But that s not a lot of

    Original URL path: https://aob.oxfordjournals.org/content/117/2/iii.full?related-urls=yes&legid=annbot;117/2/iii (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



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